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Who can I talk to about getting help for post-traumatic stress disorder?

There are many resources available to help veterans with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

Talking to your family doctor, a therapist, or with someone at your local VA medical center are good options to start. The VA provides nearly 200 specialized PTSD treatment programs. Close friends and family members, fellow veterans, and religious clergy may be able to help. Ask at your local Vet’s Center about support groups in your area.

However, if you are experiencing dangerous symptoms, such as a desire to hurt yourself or others, call 911 or the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-TALK (8255) right away.

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Important: This content reflects information from various individuals and organizations and may offer alternative or opposing points of view. It should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. As always, you should consult with your healthcare provider about your specific health needs.