Physical Therapy

Physical Therapy

Physical Therapy
Physical therapy is treatment to relieve pain from injury, improve musculoskeletal movement and improve overall fitness. Exercise, stretches, electrical stimulation and massage are some of the therapies used to treat the condition. Learn more from our experts about physical therapy.

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    A , Physical Medicine & Rehabilitation, answered
    Physical Therapy can focus on improving bone strength through proper prescription of exercise base therapy to properly gauge the intensity and load on a patient with weaker bones, such as osteoporosis, fractures, atrophic diseases. This could be through aquatic therapy, anti-gravity support systems, and other modified weight-bearing exercises. It is important to have an experienced Physical Therapist to know how to properly dose the intensity/duration of exercises to stimulate proper bone growth/density without over or under doing it.
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    A Plastic Surgery, answered on behalf of
    With hydrotherapy, the patient's burn part is immersed in a tub of running warm water that washes away dead tissue and helps in softening the wound. Physical therapy helps achieve better range of motion in your joints when done in the tub.
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    Hydrotherapy works by stimulating your body’s own healing force. For instance, cold compresses reduce swelling by constricting blood vessels, helping to control minor internal bleeding. Conversely, warm, moist compresses on the painful limb dilate blood vessels, which in turn lower blood pressure and increase the flow of blood, oxygen and nutrients, and speed the elimination of toxins.

    Hydrotherapy works well for almost all types of pain. No matter what type of pain you experience, when the pain first starts to flare, it’s important to treat it immediately with compresses of either ice or heat on the painful site -- whichever brings you the most relief. For instance, ice can reduce the pain of an injury, such as a sprain or strain, if used at least ten minutes each waking hour for the first seventy-eight hours after injury. Moist heat may give relief to chronic pain. You may use a moist heating pad, a warm, damp towel, or a hydrocollator pack. You can also stand or sit on a stool in the shower and let warm water hit the painful area on your body.

    You may want to alternate the ice compresses with the moist heat for optimal benefit. You may use the moist heat for a few minutes just before and after stretching or resistance or aerobic exercise to make it less painful and more effective.
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    Hydrotherapy can help relax tense muscles and ease pain associated with fibromyalgia. The term hydrotherapy is used to describe several different treatments and self-help strategies that involve water. Hydrotherapy treatment can be as simple as applying hot or cold wet towels to a painful area. Motion-based spas therapy and water yoga and other exercises performed in a swimming pool are also forms of hydrotherapy.
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    A , Midwifery Nursing, answered

    The use of hydrotherapy has been used for years to help moms cope with the pain of labor and to promote relaxation. The women in our practice love our tubs with the jets, the soothing warm water and the quiet peaceful environment provided in our tub rooms.

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    A , Dermatology, answered
    The use of hydrotherapy goes back to ancient Greece when all forms of water--from ice to steam--were used to promote healing and well-being. Today’s spas use hydrotherapy as a method of stimulating the client’s own healing force. For instance, cold compresses are placed on the skin to reduce inflammation by constricting blood vessels, helping to control minor internal bleeding. Conversely, warm, moist compresses are placed on the skin to dilate blood vessels, which in turn lowers blood pressure and increases the flow of blood, oxygen and nutrients, and speeds the elimination of toxins.

    Many spa patrons find long-lasting relief with balneotherapy, or the use of hot baths or Jacuzzis to alleviate tension and stress. This centuries-old therapy helps to increase muscle relaxation, boost blood supply to the site, and relieve muscle rigidity and spasms. Epsom salts or bicarbonate of soda can also be added to therapeutic warm baths to assist in detoxification.
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    A , Midwifery Nursing, answered

    During pregnancy the body releases a hormone called relaxin which allows the ligaments to be more flexible and sometimes can lead to more joint and ligament discomfort. As the uterus grows in size and moms weight increases she is also more prone to swelling after a long day on her feet. Hydrotherapy is a great way for women to use water by soaking in a tub or shower to help promote good circulation, decrease the weight and help reduce the swelling and help the muscles to relax. Hydrotherapy is a great way to deal with Braxton-hicks or false labor contractions as well as early labor at home. Most birthing centers and some hospitals like mine have tubs available for labor. Using water therapy can also help women deal with labor contractions and help to make for an easier birth.

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    Hydrotherapy can help people with fibromyalgia feel less pain, build strength, and gain greater range of motion. Hydrotherapy refers to treatments that involve water in some way. It might be as simple as applying hot or cold damp towels to painful body parts. Or it may involve therapeutic exercise performed in a swimming pool, such as water yoga. Simply taking a warm, relaxing bath can be a form of hydrotherapy. Other names for hydrotherapy include water therapy, pool therapy, and aqua therapy.
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    Is Physical Therapy More Important for Certain Patients?
    Physical therapy is more important for patients who are older and less active, says Julia Saddington, PA from John Randolph Medical Center. Learn more in this video.
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    A , Neurology, answered
    By relaxing the tense muscles that commonly accompany tension and migraine headaches, certain types of physical therapy may provide relief. Your physical therapist may teach you daily neck and shoulder exercises you can do on your own or use devices and techniques aimed at relaxing muscles. These might include the following:
    • ultrasound, which uses a device that emits sound waves that penetrate the skin and warm muscle tissue
    • electrical nerve stimulation, which employs a battery-powered device to send electrical signals to underlying nerves
    • traction, which involves using a special device to stretch a tight muscle, usually in the neck
    • myofascial release, which involves performing a series of massage-like techniques to stretch tight muscles