Personality

Personality

When we have a sense of self that allows us to interact appropriate with the world and other people we have a functional personality. Some forms of mental illness can skew the thought process so it interferes with how we deal with others. People with personality disorders may abuse drugs, may have lots of ups and downs in relationships, may have trouble making friends, may be isolated. There are many different kinds of disorders, but its important to know that it is possible to overcome them.

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    A , Alternative & Complementary Medicine, answered
    It is natural for the ego to seek pleasure, thinking that once itis found, happiness is the result. Pleasure is not an antidote forpain, however. If you are suffering, no amount of pleasurableexperience from the outside will relieve your anguish. Thisdisproves the ego's assumptions, but still there is no need torenounce pleasure. Instead we have to acknowledge that happinesscomes from another source. What is that source? It is theunchanging essence that lies within.

    As the ancient sages declared, we all know what it's like to wakeup from a dream. Spirit is known just as easily. After youexperience a moment of waking up to it, the dream of pleasurebecomes unreal. This waking up needs to occur over and over. Youneed to notice those instances of alert, joyful, alive, free,unbounded being. They come and go, but not like the things thatchange all around us. Essence comes and goes like the sun, whichonce free of clouds, can be seen to shine constantly.
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     According to the Merrium Webster Dictionary awarenesss is synonomous with self awareness and self awareness is defined as an awareness of one's own personality or individuality. Awareness is the act of being present. Self is the "I" experienced by each individual; who we preceive ourself to be. Awareness is the act of being present with yourself. It is the act of knowing how you are feeling in the present moment, paying attention  to what you body is telling you, not what your mind is thinking of telling you.

    Rogers, a famous psychologist, came up with the theory that a person's self-concept determines his behavior and his relation to the world, and that true theraputic improvements occur only when the individual changes his own self-concept. In every moment of everyday we have a choice, to either accept the moment or resist it, to either embrace the moment or push it away.How do we then know when to make a choice if we are never aware of the moment we have a chance to make a choice? Many of us are on auto pilot, we don't even realize how unaware we are of our reactions to the world, events, situations and circumstances.We just react and then deal with the consequences, rarely realizing if we had just reacted differently, if we had just taken a moment to be aware, we could of realized we had a choice to make and the outcome could of been different.

    This is the first step to awareness, to understand when there is a moment to be aware. We can't make changes if we don't know exactly what it is we want to change. We can't set goals if we are not aware of the goals we want to achieve. We have to take time and be present and be aware and to listen to what our bodies are saying to us. Rabbi Noah Weinberg said "It all begings with a decision, a commitment. Try saying aloud, Life is an opportunity. I want to use my mind, and be constantly moving toward my goal." This is awareness the ability to preceive who it is you are and who it is you want to be, to set goals, to be commited and go for it!

     "Every human has 4 endowments: self-awareness, consciousness, independent will, and creative imagination. These give us the ultimate human freedom... the power to chose, to respond, to change!" - Steven R. Covey

     

     

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    A , Integrative Medicine, answered
    Positive psychology is the science of the positive aspects of human life such as happiness, well-being, and flourishing. It is the scientific study of optimal functioning that aims to discover and promote the factors that allow individuals and communities to thrive.
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    A , Psychology, answered

    This is a favorite topic in women’s magazines. There’s no magic way of making time other than carving it out and sticking to your guns. I don’t care if you sit in the middle of your living room floor naked staring at your chipped nails. Most people who have trouble being alone are so anxious when there aren’t people around or when they’re not busy, that they freak (and turn to food). That’s because when you’re alone, you start to experience your true feelings: confusion, anger, loneliness, depression, anxiety. These emotions have value. You may not know what to do when you’re alone other than think about what you should do. Spend enough time by yourself and something will surface. Cross my heart.

     

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    A , Alternative & Complementary Medicine, answered
    Identifying with a false image of who you are causes a great deal of suffering in other ways. Life never stops demanding more and more. The demands on our time, patience, ability, and emotions can become so overwhelming that admitting your inadequacy seems like the honest thing to do. Yet in a person's false self-image is buried the ugly history of everything that has gone wrong. "I won't," "I can't," and "I give up" all flow from Sanskrit's fourth klesha -- identifying with an imaginary self.
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    A , Psychology, answered
    Canadian researchers Gordon L. Flett and Paul L. Hewitt wrote the book on perfectionism, so to speak. (Their textbook on the topic is called Perfectionism: Theory, Research, and Treatment.) They consider “normal” perfectionism as having a goal of flawlessness: “Normal perfectionism is defined as striving for reasonable and realistic standards that leads to a sense of self-satisfaction and enhanced self-esteem.”
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    A , Alternative & Complementary Medicine, answered
    There are only three kinds of people in your life: Those who leave you alone, those who help you and those who hurt you.

    People who leave you alone are dealing with your suffering as a nuisance or an inconvenience -- they prefer to keep their distance in order to feel better about themselves. People who help you have the strength and awareness to do more with your suffering than you are able to do by yourself. Those who hurt you want the situation to stay the same because they do not have your well-being at heart. Honestly count how many people in each category you have in your life. This isn't the same as counting friends and loving family members. Assess others solely as they relate to your difficulties.

    Having made a realistic count, take the following attitude:
    • I will no longer bring my problems to anyone who wants to leave me alone. It's not good for them or for me. They don't want to help, so I will not ask them to help me.
    • I will share my problems with those who want to help me. I will not reject genuine offers of assistance out of pride, insecurity or doubt. I will ask these people to join me in my healing and make them a bigger part of my life. 
    • I will put a distance between myself and those who want to hurt me. I do not have to confront them, guilt-trip them, or make them the cause of my self-pity. But I cannot afford to absorb their toxic effect on me, and if that means keeping my distance, I will.
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    A , Gastroenterology, answered

    Merriam-Webster Online defines it as “the quality or state of being aware; especially of something within oneself.” Each of the knocked out athletes  seemingly belies this definition. Out cold, they are hardly aware. The comatose patient also poses issues regarding a person’s state of self-awareness. For that matter, so, too, does losing yourself in a jazz riff or heavy metal haze. In some cases, Webster’s definition may not always fit the facts. 

    What constitutes consciousness has been for centuries a matter of theological speculation, scientific inquiry, quack theorizing, and philosophical debate. 

    Descartes located consciousness in thinking: “I think, therefore I am." Carl Sagan once quipped that we are “star stuff contemplating the stars." Timothy Leary expanded consciousness far beyond thought. John Lennon imagined an idealized world. Some people associate consciousness simply with being awake.

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    A , Psychology, answered

    To end your nice girl manifesto towards your friends:

    • Extend yourself toward people you like and care about.
    • Expect friends to be emotionally healthy, self-aware, and working on resolving their issues.
    • Require that friends be good listeners, go out of their way for you, provide validation, understanding, sound advice, and solicited (and if you are harming yourself, unsolicited) feedback.
    • Seek out people who can put aside their needs and desires and who have your interest at heart.
    • Encourage friends to share their honest feelings with you in a tactful, appropriate way, even if their words hurt.
    • Anticipate that communicating authentically with friends does not come automatically but takes time, commitment, trust, guts, and energy.
    • Surround yourself with people who can take feedback so that you don’t have to sit on your hurt and stuff your feelings with food.
    • Have enough friends that all your eggs aren’t in one basket and have different kinds of associations for varying needs and activities (going out, heart-to-heart talks, etc.).
    • Allow that friends aren’t perfect and neither are you.
    • Expect that friends will share equally the work of forging a spectacular relationship.
    • Know that you will make and lose friends throughout life and believe that you will always have good friends as long as you want and seek them out.
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    A , Alternative & Complementary Medicine, answered
    Control is forcing events and people into your way of doing things. Control is the great mask of insecurity. People who use this behavior are deathly afraid of letting others be who they are, so the controller is constantly making demands that keep others off balance. The underlying idea is "If they keep paying attention to me, they won't run away." When you find yourself making excuses for yourself and blaming others, or when you feel inside that no one is showing you enough gratitude or appreciation, the fault is not with them -- you are exhibiting a need to control. The external signs of this behavior come from those you are trying to control: They are tense and resistant; they complain of not being listened to; they call you a perfectionist or a demanding boss.

    Control begins to end when you admit that your way isn't automatically the right way. You can tune in to your need for control by catching yourself complaining, blaming, or insisting that no one is right but you, and coming up with one excuse after another to prove that you are without blame yourself. Once you stop controlling them, the people around you begin to breathe easy. They relax and laugh. They feel free to be who they are without looking to you for approval.
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