Peppermint

Peppermint

Peppermint
Peppermint is an herbal medicine that is used to relieve symptoms of digestive conditions. Peppermint oil can calm flatulence, indigestion and colic, in addition to treating common cold symptoms, headaches and joint pains. Peppermint is available as oil, in capsules and liquid form. As with any herbal supplements please consult your health provider for treatment, correct dosage, benefits and risk factors

Recently Answered

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    A answered
    Peppermint oil can indeed cause an allergic reaction in those sensitive to it, whether used internally or externally. In rare cases it can even cause anaphylactic shock when taken internally, causing difficulty swallowing and breathing, tongue and lip swelling, and ulcers or blisters in the mouth. Anyone showing symptoms of anaphylaxis after consuming peppermint should seek medical help immediately. Peppermint oil has also caused dermatitits when used topically, leaving a rash or hives. 
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    A , Integrative Medicine, answered
    Peppermint oil is most revered for its ability to calm upset bellies and support digestion in herbal circles. There have been several clinical trials that have shown its efficacy in treating symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome.  In fact, a 2005 literature review of 16 different trials concluded that peppermint oil “may be the drug of first choice in IBS patients with non-serious constipation or diarrhea to alleviate general symptoms and to improve quality of life.”

    Other studies have pointed to peppermint oils ability to calm spasms and assist with functional digestive issues. One trial also demonstrated its efficacy in relieving nausea in those receiving chemotherapy. Another trial showed peppermint could help with neuropathic pain from shingles. A few studies also supported the use of peppermint as an antiviral agent against herpes.

    Peppermint has also been studied for enhancing cognition, antimicrobial support, headache relief, and dental health. A few rodent studies also demonstrated radiation protection and support for allergies.

    Although peppermint oil is generally considered safe, some people may have side effects such as skin irritation. It is important to let your physician know when taking any supplement or herbal products.
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    A , Naturopathic Medicine, answered

    Peppermint oil placed in special capsules that are coated (enteric-coated) to prevent their breakdown in the stomach has been shown to be quite helpful in improving gastrointestinal function in individuals with irritable bowel syndrome (IBS). This is a common functional disorder of the large intestine characterized by some combination of the following: (1) abdominal pain; (2) altered bowel function, constipation, or diarrhea; (3) hypersecretion of colonic mucus; (4) dyspeptic symptoms (flatulence, nausea, anorexia); and (5) varying degrees of anxiety or depression.

    In several double-blind studies, enteric-coated peppermint oil (ECPO) has been shown to be effective in relieving all symptoms of IBS in approximately 70 to 85 percent of cases within a two to four weeks. In addition, ECPO has benefits in treating non-ulcer dyspepsia (NUD), and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), and in eradicating H. pylori.

    Several clinical studies of patients with IBS used a combination of peppermint oil and caraway oil. The results of these trials indicate that this combination produces better results than peppermint oil alone for symptoms of IBS. Recent studies also indicate the combination of peppermint and caraway oil is more helpful in improving non-ulcer dyspepsia (NUD). In one double-blind study, 120 patients with NUD were given either the peppermint and caraway seed oil (ECPO) or cisapride (Propulsid) for four weeks. Symptoms of NUD, including pain, were reduced equally in both groups. Positive results were also found in H. pylori-positive individuals.

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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered
    Indigestion is one of the most common causes of bloating. Peppermint improves the flow of bile to digest fats better. Lemon adds flavor so you won’t have to use sweeteners that can also cause bloating.

    Lemon Peppermint Ice Cubes

    2 1/2 cups lemon juice
    15 peppermint leaves

    Freeze peppermint leaves in lemon juice in an ice cube tray. Add 3 cubes to every glass of water at least 3 times a day, or with meals.
    This content originally appeared on doctoroz.com
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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered
    Peppermint oil has anti-inflammatory properties and soothes the nerves. Rub into the temples and forehead when a headache starts and rub; repeat every 15-30 minutes for added relief. Available for $7 at health food stores.
    This content originally appeared on doctoroz.com
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    A answered
    The US FDA does not regulate herbal medications and there is often limited information about how they work and how they interact which prescription medications. With that said, there is some research that suggests that peppermint may interfere with the body's enzyme system that metabolizes many medications.  Many cholesterol medications, such as Zocor, are affected by this enzyme system. As a result, Zocor levels may increase in the body, causing unwanted side effects or even overdoses when Zocor is taken with peppermint.  You should not start any new herbal supplement or over-the-counter preparation without talking to your physician first.
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    A , Neurology, answered
    Topical peppermint oil for headaches can be used by women who are nursing -- but not while you are actually breastfeeding your baby. Peppermint oil should never be used near the faces of babies or children, because it can cause potentially dangerous spasms of the breathing system.
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    A , Neurology, answered
    Peppermint oil is derived from the plant Mentha piperita, with the main active components being menthol and menthon. Peppermint reduces gastric distress and acts as a topical analgesic. A solution of 10 g peppermint oil in alcohol may be applied lightly to the forehead and temples during a headache attack, and repeated after 15 and 30 minutes. In one study, migraine improved by at least half in 58 percent of people treating their migraine with topical peppermint oil compared with only 17 percent using an inactive placebo. Migraine pain was completely eliminated for 38 percent treating with topical peppermint oil compared with only 12 percent using the placebo. Although not specifically tested for other headaches, topical peppermint oil may also be worth trying during a migraine attack. It should never be applied to or near the faces of infants or small children, as this may result in serious and potentially life-threatening spasm of respiratory structures and respiratory distress.