Pelvic Inflammatory Disease (PID)

Pelvic Inflammatory Disease (PID)

Pelvic inflammatory disease, also known as PID, affects around 1 million women in the United States every year. Your female reproductive organs become infected when bacteria from your vagina, often from a sexually transmitted disease, spreads to your upper genital tract. If left untreated, PID can lead to ectopic pregnancies or infertility. Symptoms may include painful periods or urination, a dull pain in your lower abdomen, yellow or green odorous vaginal discharges, fever, chills, or vomiting. PID can be treated with antibiotics. However, when an abscess occurs, treatment may require surgery to prevent widespread infection.

Recently Answered

  • 1 Answer
    A

    Having pelvic inflammatory disease once doesn't protect you from getting infected again. In fact, you're more likely to develop PID if you've already had it before. Even if you've been treated for the infection, you may become re-infected, especially if your sex partner does not receive treatment at the same time. To reduce your risk of getting PID again, avoid having sex until you and your partner have completed treatment, and practice safe sex by using a condom and limiting your number of sex partners.

  • 1 Answer
    A

    If pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) is treated early, a cure may be possible. In most cases, a dose of antibiotics for chlamydia or gonorrhea is used to treat the infection. However, if the partner of the infected person doesn't get treated, they can re-infect that person. Also, if pelvic inflammatory disease isn't diagnosed or treated till the infection has spread, treatment can't reverse the damage already done. Complications of untreated PID may include scarring of the fallopian tubes, which can lead to infertility. Because of this, it's important to get tested regularly for STDS that may lead to PID, and see a doctor right away if you notice any unusual symptoms.

  • 1 Answer
    A

    If your partner has pelvic inflammatory disease (PID), it's important to support them and take care of your own health, too. Once your partner finds out they have PID, it's important for them to start treatment right away. You should also be tested and treated if necessary. You and your partner should avoid having sex until treatment is complete and the infection is gone. If your partner has had PID for a long time without knowing it and then is diagnosed, it's important to be emotionally supportive. PID may lead to infertility, so talk with your partner about their feelings.

  • 1 Answer
    A

    If you have symptoms that you think may be caused by pelvic inflammatory disease, you should talk to your doctor. Symptoms may not be noticeable, but some of the first symptoms of PID may include pelvic pain, vaginal discharge, and abnormal menstrual bleeding. As the infection gets worse, you may have severe abdominal pain, fever, and vomiting. If you notice these or any other unusual symptoms, it's a good idea to talk to your doctor right away.

  • 1 Answer
    A

    Pelvic inflammatory disease itself is not necessarily contagious, but many of the bacteria that cause it are contagious. PID develops when bacteria move from the vagina into the upper reproductive organs. These bacteria may be spread through sexual contact - PID is commonly caused by the bacteria responsible for gonorrhea and chlamydia. In some cases, though, the infection may be caused by bacteria that are normally found in the vagina. These bacteria aren't contagious. In general, reduce your risk of getting an STD that can lead to PID by using a condom and limiting your number of sex partners.

  • 4 Answers
    A
    Symptoms of pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) can vary. PID may have severe or mild symptoms, and sometimes there are no symptoms. Common symptoms are lower abdominal or pelvic pain, fever, vaginal discharge and pain or bleeding with intercourse.  
    See All 4 Answers
  • 1 Answer
    A

    Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) may affect your sex life for several reasons. Sometimes PID may cause sex to become painful. Because PID is often caused by a sexually transmitted disease, it's important to avoid sex until you've completed treatment for the infection. Treatment involves seeing a doctor and finishing any and all medications that are prescribed to you. Any sex partners who've had sexual contact with an infected person should also avoid sexual contact and should be treated for pelvic inflammatory disease so partners avoid re-infecting one another.

  • 2 Answers
    A

    Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) can be painful in some cases. Some of the first symptoms of PID may include pain in the lower abdomen or pain during menstruation or intercourse. As the infection progresses, the pelvic or abdominal pain may become more severe. However, in many cases PID doesn't cause any noticeable symptoms.

    See All 2 Answers
  • 1 Answer
    A
    It's estimated that almost a million women in the United States develop pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) each year. Of those, it's thought that about ten percent will become infertile each year as a result of PID. In fact, PID is the leading preventable cause of infertility in American women. Because of this, it's important to see your doctor right away if you notice any symptoms.
  • 1 Answer
    A

    Although testing for pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) is usually done only if a woman has noticeable symptoms, it's a good idea to be tested for sexually transmitted diseases on a regular basis. STDs such as chlamydia and gonorrhea are common causes of PID, so if you're at risk, you should be tested regularly. People at high risk may include sexually active women under the age of 25, and women who have unprotected sex with multiple partners. If STDs are caught early, the chance that they will develop into PID is decreased. Talk to your doctor about getting tested.