Pelvic Inflammatory Disease (PID)

Pelvic Inflammatory Disease (PID)

Pelvic inflammatory disease, also known as PID, affects around 1 million women in the United States every year. Your female reproductive organs become infected when bacteria from your vagina, often from a sexually transmitted disease, spreads to your upper genital tract. If left untreated, PID can lead to ectopic pregnancies or infertility. Symptoms may include painful periods or urination, a dull pain in your lower abdomen, yellow or green odorous vaginal discharges, fever, chills, or vomiting. PID can be treated with antibiotics. However, when an abscess occurs, treatment may require surgery to prevent widespread infection.

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    Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) starts when bacteria enter the female reproductive organs, usually as a result of a sexually transmitted disease. Sometimes, bacteria that are normally found in the vagina overgrow and spread to the fallopian tubes or uterus. When bacteria enter these areas, they cause infection that may spread to the ovaries, or it may produce abscesses or pus-filled pockets in the fallopian tubes. Sometimes the infection may not cause any noticeable symptoms, but other times it may lead to vaginal discharge, abnormal menstrual bleeding, and abdominal or pelvic pain. As the infection progresses, it may cause severe pain, fever, and vomiting. Eventually, the infection may spread to surrounding internal structures like the lining of the abdominal cavity and organs. Other times, the infection can produce scar tissue that leads to infertility.

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    After you've been treated for pelvic inflammatory disease (PID), there are certain follow-up steps you should take. Make sure you avoid sexual contact until you've completed your treatment. Also, it's important to tell any sex partners you've had within the last 60 days that you're being treated, so they can also get treatment. Remember that you can be re-infected with bacteria that lead to PID even after treatment, so practice safe sex by using condoms and get tested regularly for sexually transmitted diseases.

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    IIf it's caught and treated early, pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) generally doesn't cause any complications. However, if left untreated, it may cause serious complications. The infection may cause scarring in the fallopian tubes, which can lead to infertility. In fact, a 100,000 women who get PID will become infertile each year. Scar tissue may also increase the chances of ectopic pregnancy, which is a serious condition in which the fertilized egg can't travel into the uterus and becomes stuck in the fallopian tubes. In some cases, PID may lead to chronic pelvic pain that can last for years. To prevent these potential complications, talk to your doctor right away if you notice any symptoms that may be caused by PID.
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    A OBGYN (Obstetrics & Gynecology), answered on behalf of
    Yes, Pelvic Inflammatory Disease (PID) is a serious medical condition.  If left untreated, PID can cause scar tissue inside the uterus and in the pelvis.  Tubal pregnancies and infertility can occur.  If the infection is left untreated, PID can require hospitalization and even surgery in severe cases.  It is important to seek medical care as soon as you suspect PID.  Finish the complete course of antibiotics prescribed.  A follow-up examination is important to assure resolution.  
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    Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) doesn't affect men because it's an infection of the fallopian tubes and uterus. It develops when bacteria move from the vagina up into the upper reproductive organs. Many times, these bacteria are sexually transmitted, and STDs like gonorrhea and chlamydia may lead to PID. Obviously, it's possible for men to have those STDs, and they can spread the responsible bacteria to a woman. However, it's not possible for those STDs to develop into PID in men like they can in women.

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    Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) is usually first treated with antibiotics to destroy the bacteria that are causing the infection. These antibiotics are often taken by mouth or injected into a muscle. In severe cases, PID may require hospitalization, where antibiotics may be given intravenously. In rare cases, surgery may be needed to drain abscesses in the fallopian tubes. Any sexual partners should be tested and treated with antibiotics at the same time to prevent re-infection, and people with PID should avoid having sex until they've completed treatment and the infection is gone.

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    It's a common misconception that the use of an intrauterine device (IUD) increases the risk of developing pelvic inflammatory disease (PID). The risk of developing PID is minimally increased during the first 20 days after insertion of the device, but after that time, the risk returns to baseline. This risk can be reduced by testing women for sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) before IUD insertion and treating appropriately. IUDs are an extremely safe and effective means of preventing pregnancy, with less than 1% unintended pregnancies per year.
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    If you have symptoms that you think may be caused by pelvic inflammatory disease, you should talk to your doctor. Symptoms may not be noticeable, but some of the first symptoms of PID may include pelvic pain, vaginal discharge, and abnormal menstrual bleeding. As the infection gets worse, you may have severe abdominal pain, fever, and vomiting. If you notice these or any other unusual symptoms, it's a good idea to talk to your doctor right away.

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    A OBGYN (Obstetrics & Gynecology), answered on behalf of
    Often pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) is painful.  Patients will complain of pain with intercourse.  A sharp stabbing pain in the lower abdomen can be a sign of PID.  Fever and chills and sometimes vaginal discharge can happen. 
    Seek medical care immediately because PID can cause chronic medical conditions, such as infertility.  The most common infections that cause PID, gonorrhea and chlamydia, can also be transmitted sexually to your partner, so treatment is essential.
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    Pelvic inflammatory disease (PID) may affect your sex life for several reasons. Sometimes PID may cause sex to become painful. Because PID is often caused by a sexually transmitted disease, it's important to avoid sex until you've completed treatment for the infection. Treatment involves seeing a doctor and finishing any and all medications that are prescribed to you. Any sex partners who've had sexual contact with an infected person should also avoid sexual contact and should be treated for pelvic inflammatory disease so partners avoid re-infecting one another.