Obsessive Compulsive Disorder

Obsessive Compulsive Disorder

Frequent obsessive thoughtsand constantly trying to tame those thoughts with actions (like hand washing)those are the symptoms of obsessive-compulsive disorder. If you have this internal battle, you know it can take over your life. With counseling and medications, you can quiet the turmoil inside.

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    What are the most common obsessions with OCD?
    Unwanted obsessions are at the root of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). In this WisePatient video, psychiatrist Wayne Goodman, MD, of The Mount Sinai Medical Center, describes the most common hallmarks of OCD, including worries about germs.
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    Discovery Health CME: How Can You Prevent OCD?
    Watch as Dr. Lorrin Koran of Stanford University answers questions about obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) -- including whether it can be prevented -- in this video from Discovery Health.


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    How is OCD severity rated?

    Obsessive compulsive disorder is rated on a scale of 0 to 40 using an assessment test called a Y-BOCS. Find out more about this test in this video with Wayne Goodman, MD, chairman of the Department of Psychiatry at the Mount Sinai School of Medicine.


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    How is OCD diagnosed?

    Unlike many conditions, obsessive compulsive disorder cannot be diagnosed with a blood test or scan. Wayne Goodman, MD, chairman of the Department of Psychiatry at the Mount Sinai School of Medicine, explains how trained specialist diagnose OCD.


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    Are OCD and Tourette’s syndrome linked?
    Obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and Tourette's syndrome are unique conditions. But, as psychatrist Wayne Goodman, MD, of The Mount Sinai Medical Center, explains in this WisePatient video, there's a link between the two.
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    Can stress make OCD worse?

    Stress and obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) often go hand in hand. In this WisePatient video, psychatrist Wayne Goodman, MD, of the Mount Sinai Medical Center, explains how stress may exacerbate OCD symptoms.

     

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    Is there a link between OCD and depression?
    Depression is a common complication of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD). In this WisePatient video, psychiatrist Wayne Goodman, MD, of The Mount Sinai Medical Center, reveals that a depression diagnosis may precede one for OCD.
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    A , Epidemiology, answered

    Picking scabs is a sign of dermatillomania, which means obsessive picking at the skin. Sometimes, picking at scabs is simply a habit that you can stop doing. If you find yourself feeling anxious when you try to control your picking, seek an evaluation by a mental health professional. Cognitive behavioral therapy is the standard treatment. In a large city, you may also be able to find group therapy as well.

    People with OCD often have dermatillomania (around 23 percent according to the OCD Center of Los Angeles) so it is natural to wonder if someone with dermatillomania also has obsessive-compulsive disorder. The answer lies in whether they have classic OCD symptoms; such as getting worrisome thoughts in their mind that they cannot stop thinking about or compulsively performing actions such as checking a locked door.

    It is quite possible to pick scabs but not have OCD. If you cannot stop picking on your own, or find that you develop a new habit to replace the picking, schedule an appointment with a mental health professional as they can help you understand your symptoms and provide you with effective treatment.

     

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    A , Psychiatry, answered
    What are the symptoms of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD)?
    Symptoms of obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) include intrusive thoughts that are irrational or worrisome, paired with ritualistic behaviors or compulsions that alleviate anxiety. Watch psychiatrist Sue Varma, MD, explain the main symptoms of OCD.
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    A , Psychiatry, answered
    The core of all perfectionism is the intention to do something well. If you can keep your eye on your intention and desired outcome, adjusting your strategy when needed, you're fine. Being neat, organized, and detail-oriented is fine, just not in ways so time-consuming that you lose sight of priorities and can't do other valued things.

    Perfectionists strive to have high personal standards. That's great. Keep doing that, but pay attention to preoccupations and to assigning mistakes too much importance. Perfectionism becomes a problem when driven by fear or rigid rules. When you ruminate about mistakes, when you can't tolerate making a mistake, when your strategy is to make no mistakes, that's when perfectionism starts veering off in the wrong direction.