Nursing

Nursing

Nursing

Nursing is a healthcare profession that involves years of training and continued specialized education to care for patients in a variety of settings. Nurses are often the first healthcare professional that patients meet. They are a technical expert, an educator, a counselor and a resource for the family, using all senses to better care for a patient.

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    A , Nursing, answered
    Let’s think about the word trust.  Patients place their trust in us each time they are admitted to our care.  They expect, and they deserve, the best outcome possible.  Yet, healthcare is a risky business.  Life is a journey, and with well-placed trust, the journey can meet and exceed your expectations.  As nurses and patients, trust matters! Why trust?  Why does it matter?  It matters to each and every one of us as professionals because Americans have been asked to rate the honesty and ethics of various professions annually since 1990, and periodically since 1976 through the Gallup Poll.   Nurses have topped the list each year since they were first included in 1999, with the exception of 2001 when firefighters were included in response to their work during and after the 9/11 attacks. Since 2005, at least 80% of Americans have said nurses have high ethics and honesty.  Nurses advocate for patients and their families, they respond to concerns, they refer appropriately, and they are active listeners.  If you were asked to identify the 3 most significant factors in creating trust, what might your list look like?  My own choices would include:  1) honesty and openness – a willingness to tell the truth about a clinical situation, about a patient encounter, and knowing that the truth is honored within my organization; 2) ensuring transparency – creating a platform in which transparency is valued ; and 3) acknowledging the situation and using it as a learning opportunity. Hospitals are a center of trust, and nursing is at its core!
     
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    A Nursing, answered on behalf of

    How can Nurses make a difference in the health of their patients? Nurses can make a huge difference in the health of their patients by many methods. Nurses can teach their patients education regarding the disease process that make be affecting the patient at that time. Nurses give patients resources to improve their lives and disease outcomes. Nurses pass medications and teach procedures to patients to help them achieve compliance with their health related needs. Nurses can improve a patient’s health by teaching them emotional coping skills to handle stressful situations. The opportunities are endless for the role that a nurse may play in a patient's health.

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    A Critical Care Nursing, answered on behalf of
    The nursing profession consists of registered professional nurses who practice in a variety of settings. To become a nurse one must attend a program of study most often at the Associate Degree level of the Baccalaureate Degree level. Upon completion they must pass a state licensing exam in order to practice. Nurses may practice in a wide variety of settings such as Med-Surg, Critical Care, or Maternal-Child. Nursing is a predominantly female profession but efforts are being made to recruit more male nurses, along with nurses from underrepresented populations.
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    A , Nursing, answered
    Nurses are 'the most trusted healthcare professionals.' They are with patients throughout the continuum of life. Nurses are teacher, advocates, caregivers, critical thinkers, and innovators. They do so much more than care for individuals...their presence 24/7 has transformed lives. Nursing is an honorable profession, and nurses are the heart and soul of the healthcare system. 
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    A , Nursing, answered
    What traits of nurses are helpful when it comes to getting healthy?
    When it comes to getting and staying healthy, nurses know the recipe -- from healthy eating, to getting quality sleep, to exercise tips. In this video, clinical nurse specialist Alice Benjamin, RN, shares some nursing secrets for optimal health.
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    A , Geriatric Medicine, answered

    Take a nurse with you when you go to visit a care facility to find out if:

    • Is there a multidisciplinary approach to care, that is, is there a team approach?
    • Is care individualized for each patient?
    • What kind of quality assurance program do they have in place?
    • How is their data handled?
    • Are medical records computerized?
    • Is there full documentation of what is taking place?
    • What are the checks and balances in place to assure that everything is being done above board?
    • What emergency procedures are in place?
    • What hospital will a resident be taken to if care is needed?
    • How is a resident's own physician brought into the care team?
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    A answered
    Rehabilitation nurses are always available in inpatient rehabilitation settings but often work in outpatient settings as well. Rehabilitation nurses perform all of the usual nursing functions but also focus on helping patients with bowel and bladder function, sexuality issues, and providing education and support for the family. Rehabilitation nurses can also help people regain the ability to move, speak, and swallow by reinforcing what the therapy team is working on.
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    A Nursing, answered on behalf of
    Known occurrences after a cardiac catheterization are bleeding from the site; formation of a hematoma; pain to site, pain in abdomen, cramps and tingling to affected extremity (right femoral site or left femoral/groin site) loss of pulse in foot. Dizziness, headaches, palpitations, and chest pain are all valid concerns.
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    A Nursing, answered on behalf of

    The term triage actually means "to sort." The triage nurse will get a short history from you about your symptoms, when the symptoms started, your drug allergies and current medications. The triage nurse will also get a set of vital signs which will include a temperature, blood pressure, heart rate, respiratory rate, and oxygen saturation.

    The triage nurse, based on your complaint and what your vital signs are, will determine where the most appropriate place in the emergency room is. Many emergency rooms have a "fast track" where patients may be sent if they have illnesses that can be assessed and treated quickly. Otherwise, if the patient will possibly need a work-up with labs, x-rays, IV fluids, etc., the patient will be triaged into a room in the emergency department where higher acuity, or more complex, complaints are sent.

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    What does an emergency room (ER) nurse do?
    Registered nurses in emergency departments are trained on multiple different areas and are experienced nurses. In this video, Lynn Tadlock, RN, of Los Robles Hospital & Medical Center, explains the training and certifications that are required.
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