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How do medications treat benign multiple sclerosis?

For the most part, the medications used to treat benign multiple sclerosis (MS) are the same as those used for any other type of MS. Some of these medications reduce inflammation while others target specific symptoms. Unfortunately, some of these medications may not be necessary to treat benign MS but there's no way of knowing whether you have a more serious type of MS until you've gone well over a decade without developing a severe physical disability. Here is a list of common medications used to treat multiple sclerosis:

  • Copaxone (Glatiramer) when injected daily may block attacks against myelin.
  • Corticosteroids, such as prednisone, work to reduce swelling that occurs during attack periods, or relapses.
  • Interferons work to slow MS symptoms that can get worse with time.
  • Tysabri aims to stop bad immune cells from reaching your brain or spinal cord. It puts you at risk for serious a brain infection though, so it is generally only used when no other treatments are effective.

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Important: This content reflects information from various individuals and organizations and may offer alternative or opposing points of view. It should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. As always, you should consult with your healthcare provider about your specific health needs.