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Why is MRSA an antibiotic resistant infection?

Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is resistant to methicillin (a broad-spectrum antibiotic), because it has a functioning gene (the mecA gene). This gene codes for substances that protect the bacteria from the effects of the antibiotic. In addition, studies have shown that often, MRSA are also resistant to a number of other commonly used antibiotics. This is what makes MRSA infections so difficult to treat. Antibiotic susceptibility of MRSA can be and should be determined in the laboratory as soon as the bacteria are identified as a S. aureus.  Dr. G.

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Important: This content reflects information from various individuals and organizations and may offer alternative or opposing points of view. It should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. As always, you should consult with your healthcare provider about your specific health needs.