Advertisement

How can prescription mood-altering drugs affect my health?

Prescription mood-altering drugs, such as anti-anxiety agents, antidepressants, and sedatives, have long been marketed to women. Benzodiazepines are one category of prescribed mood altering drugs, commonly referred to as tranquilizers. Doctors have prescribed them widely, especially to women, since the 1960s for short-term relief of anxiety and sleeping problems, as well as to ease withdrawal from other drugs. Common tranquilizers are Valium (diazepam), Ativan (lorazepam), Serax (oxazepam), Xanax (alprazolam), and Klonopin (clonazepam). Even short-term use of tranquilizers can harm memory and reasoning, balance and coordination. And there are more serious effects from longer-term use of tranquilizers, including feeling dull, suicidal, and anxious. like alcohol, tranquilizers can be especially dangerous for women who are pregnant or elderly.

Our Bodies, Ourselves: A New Edition for a New Era

More About this Book

Our Bodies, Ourselves: A New Edition for a New Era

America's best-selling book on all aspects of women's health With more than four million copies sold, "Our Bodies, Ourselves" is "the" classic resource that women of all ages can turn to for...

Continue Learning about Mood Stablizing Agents

Does carbamazepine have any side effects?
Donna Hill Howes, RNDonna Hill Howes, RN
Side effects may include dizziness, drowsiness, depressed mood, anxiety, weakness, headaches, lazy e...
More Answers
What should I know before taking carbamazepine?
Donna Hill Howes, RNDonna Hill Howes, RN
Your doctor will need to do blood work, liver tests, and a urine analysis before starting treatment....
More Answers
Eat Cereal for Breakfast, Be Happy All Day
Eat Cereal for Breakfast, Be Happy All Day
Avoid These Bad Fats for a Better Mood
Avoid These Bad Fats for a Better Mood

Important: This content reflects information from various individuals and organizations and may offer alternative or opposing points of view. It should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. As always, you should consult with your healthcare provider about your specific health needs.