Metabolism and Weight Loss

Metabolism and Weight Loss

Metabolism and Weight Loss
One of the key elements in weight management is to understand your metabolism. Metabolism is the body's way of getting the energy it needs from food. Things like starvation dieting and sitting for extended amounts of time drastically slow down your metabolism, while exercise, clean eating and a good night's sleep are considered metabolism boosters. Finding out your unique metabolic type is also a great place to start burning fat and controlling your weight.

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    A , Endocrinology Diabetes & Metabolism, answered
    Patients' claims that they must have a metabolic imbalance because they continue to gain weight despite eating very little is often met with skepticism if not out-right ridicule. I have found that such claims are not exaggerated, as most obese patients who have difficulty losing weight do have reduced metabolism (reduced number of calories burned per day) and usually have leptin resistance or low tissue thyroid levels (not detected by standard blood tests) that make it very difficult to lose weight.

    This phenomenon has been documented in the medical literature as well but has largely been ignored by most physicians. One example is a study by Dr. Rudolph L. Leibel published in the journal Metabolism entitled Diminished Energy Requirements in Reduced-Obese Patients which compared the basal metabolic rate in individuals who had lost significant weight to those of the same weight who had not lost significant weight in the past. The authors found that those who had dieted and lost weight in the past had, on average, a 25% lower metabolism than the control patients who had not lost significant weight.
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    A , Endocrinology Diabetes & Metabolism, answered
    Did you know that your metabolism changes as you age?  This process begins for most of us around age 30. Your metabolism actually ages faster than the number of candles on your birthday cake—slowing down by 5 percent each decade. By age 45, you’re burning about 200 fewer calories per day than you did when you were 25. This translates into a weight gain of up to 12 pounds per year.  In addition, the complex process of metabolism affects every function of your body, including energy level and cognitive functioning. As we age and our hormonal levels fluctuate, muscle loss further lowers your body’s metabolism, replacing your lean muscle tissue with fat, which generally settles in around your midsection, hips, and thighs.

    You can reignite a stalled metabolism. Accomplish this by eating more protein, vegetables, and fruits. This ensures that your body stays full, fueled, and has the essential amino acids necessary for cell and tissue regeneration and repair. Build muscle through strength training exercises and make sure to get a full night’s rest. Studies have demonstrated that getting enough sleep is essential to optimal body function, including maintaining a healthy weight.  Follow this advice, and you’ll be on your way to burning fat, losing weight, maintaining brain function, feeling energetic, and keeping your immune system strong.
                
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    A , Naturopathic Medicine, answered

    One of the most important things you can do to ensure that your body burns a significant number of calories as heat is to spread your calories throughout the day. Skipping meals lowers your resting metabolism and makes it more likely that your body will store the extra calories eaten later as fat. A low-glycemic impact, high-protein breakfast is the most important food of the day. When you skip breakfast, you are telling your body that you are starving today and your metabolic rate will likely be lower for the rest of the day. When you start the day with a hearty breakfast, you are telling your body that there is plenty of food, so it tends to expend more of the calories you eat that day as heat. It is also important to follow breakfast with healthy snacks, lunches, and a relatively light evening meal.

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    Many dieters work against themselves by starving their way into what's called starvation metabolism. This is when your poorly nourished body, sensing starvation, begins burning calories at a slower rate to survive longer. Once you're in starvation mode, you might eat very little -- but still find that you're packing on the pounds.
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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered
    Keep your metabolism motor running all night long with a Spicy Red Icey. Combine a spicy red wine, like a Rioja or Malbec, with ice chips and a bit of mint. The wine not only helps you relax, but also has the added benefit of boosting metabolism for up to 95 minutes after you enjoy it. And while wine snobs may not approve, adding ice chips to your red wine forces your body to burn calories, as it has to use its own energy to warm the liquid to body temperature. The mint will add an interesting kick, and its scent has been shown to stave off those late-night hunger cravings.

    This content originally appeared on doctoroz.com
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    A low impact or sedentary job will most likely cause your metabolism to slow down. This happens because your body does not need to burn as many calories in order to maintain function. A sedentary job is one of the many reasons people gain weight each year. In order to combat this, make sure that you exercise more and watch what you eat!
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    A , Fitness, answered

    The simple answer to this is that over a period of years the yo-yo effect of going on and off of diets is a slow stripping of lean body mass. Also, if these diets border on starvation levels your body simply reduces your burn rate to compensate for such huge reductions in calorie intake. Your lean mass or muscle has a metabolic need of roughly 25-50 calories per pound per day. If you, over time reduce your lean body mass and burn rate through starvation type diet principals you simply set yourself up for higher and higher percentages of overall body fat even at lower and lower levels of body weight and very real reductions in caloric need. This effectively reduces your total metabolic rate significantly over time.

    We all have to learn to reduce calories systematically while maintaining a smart fitness program that helps us retain muscle while we lose body fat. This is how we maintain our metabolic rate while reducing body fat and overall body weight.

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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered
    Dr. Oz - Powell Break Diet

    If you're gaining weight, you may wonder if your metabolism has slowed. In this video, fitness expert Chris Powell tells Dr. Oz what's really causing your expanding waistline.


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    A , Fitness, answered

    Metabolism simply put is the sum total of all chemical processes that occur in your body on a daily basis. Every one of these processes require energy to one degree or another and when you add all those energy demands up that is your daily caloric need or your metabolic rate.

    When we exercise we increase our metabolic rate by increasing our demand. Think of metabolism as a checking account; when you eat you put money into the account but as the day goes on the account just keeps leaking money based on every little thing you do and when you do big things like exercise the money comes out way faster. If you have more money going out then coming in you lose weight. If you have more money coming in then going out you gain weight.

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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered
    One theory about metabolism says that cold temperature stimulates appetite (ever notice you eat more during the winter and you're not hungry after exercising, when your body's warm?) Conversely, people with low body temperature have lower metabolism and will be prone to gaining weight.