Advertisement

How long should I keep my medical records?

Washington state Attorney General Rob McKenna, in his Ask the AG column, recommends keeping medical bills for at least one year in case there’s a reimbursement dispute. Some experts suggest keeping other records for five years after the end of treatment. Be sure to shred — not just toss — anything with your personal information, such as your health insurance ID number, to help prevent medical identity theft by trash-picking crooks.

But keep your medical history and information on your prescriptions and on your health insurer’s policies on reimbursement, benefits and other questions.

Continue Learning about Managing Your Medical Records

Getting Your Medical Record Is a Cinch
Getting Your Medical Record Is a Cinch
Change happens all the time -- in the medical profession and in your own life. Perhaps a great job opportunity requires a cross-country move. Or maybe...
Read More
Smart Ways to Use Your Medical Records
Smart Ways to Use Your Medical Records
The same law that protects the privacy of your medical records, known as HIPAA, also gives you access to your medical records. That means you can requ...
Read More
Top 7 Common Privacy Myths About Your Health Information
Top 7 Common Privacy Myths About Your Health Information
You’ve probably heard of HIPAA, the law that protects your medical privacy. In short, HIPAA limits how healthcare providers, insurers and employers ca...
Read More
What is an anecdotal report?
An anecdotal report is an incomplete description of the medical and treatment history of one or more...
More Answers

Important: This content reflects information from various individuals and organizations and may offer alternative or opposing points of view. It should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. As always, you should consult with your healthcare provider about your specific health needs.