Longevity

Longevity

Longevity
If you think the Fountain of Youth can be found inside a jar, you may want to think again. Longevity wellness isn't about appearing younger; it's about protecting your health. Consider increasing your life expectancy from the inside out with things like adding more nuts to your diet, getting better quality sleep and nurturing your healthy relationships. Everything you do can be a step towards a longer life – just make sure they're the right ones.

Recently Answered

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    Blue zones are places on Earth where, on average, people live longer and healthier lives.
    The four places around the world that are considered to be blue zones are Sardinia, Italy; Okinawa, Japan; Loma Linda, Calif; and Nicoya Peninsula, Costa Rica.
    People living in each of these places have a greater chance of reach the age of 90 than any other places on Earth. These places also have higher percentages of people who have reached age 100 than other places.

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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered
    Mediterranean populations are 22% less likely to develop breast cancer, 20% less prone to heart disease and at least 60% less likely to develop Alzheimer’s disease than Americans.
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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered
    S039 004 JapaneseDiets
    Japanese people have been shown to live four to six years longer than Americans. In this video, Dr. Oz welcomes Chef Roy Yamaguchi as they discuss the Japanese diet.


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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered
    Ever hear your grandmother say her arthritic knee told her when it was going to rain? Well, it turns out that research backs her up. It’s estimated that some 60% of people are weather-sensitive. For instance, a recent study showed that that a rise in temperature means an increase in tension headaches and migraines. Even more alarming, the number of heart attacks jumps in winter by as much as 50%. In fact, the weather actually can expose our wellness weaknesses.
    This content originally appeared on doctoroz.com
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    A , Fitness, answered
    In the case of longevity and social connectedness, it's not unlikely that individuals who have a rich social life and who are also healthier, more active, and longer-lived than their less sociable peers may have more social contacts because they're healthier, not necessarily the other way around. People who are healthy and fit may be more likely to interact with others. On the other hand, the observation that those with poor social connectedness tend to be less active and have a higher risk of heart disease, cancer, and other diseases may reflect the fact that when we don't feel well, we're less likely or able to get out and socialize.

    Which, of course, begs the important question - If we feel bad because we're sedentary and out of shape, then take up an active life and begin to feel better and have more energy, will we be more likely to get out of the house and engage in life and enjoy the many benefits? We think so.

    Whether or not you become more active, anything you can do to increase your connections with others is going to benefit your health and sense of well-being. And taking up and sticking with an active life will help. Moreover, there is growing evidence that social connections themselves act directly to improve our health, that there is a direct, biologically plausible cause-and-effect relation.
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    A , Geriatric Medicine, answered
    When it comes to longevity, environment is half of the equation. From the verdant valleys of Ecuador and the rugged mountains of Armenia to the pristine foothills of the Himalayas, centenarians live in environments that exhibit the same characteristics: clean air, good water, low stress, close communities and unspoiled nature.

    Take a tip from these centenarians and drink only filtered water. Connect with your community in a positive way. Find every way you can to bring nature into your life, from planting more trees in your area to keeping a few houseplants. Avoid the environmental factors that are damaging to our wellbeing and planet. Learn what to look out for; a few things to avoid include pesticides used on vegetables, hormones injected into meat, and dioxins from bleached paper products.
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    Some of the environmental factors that influence aging are:

    • Sun exposure: if excessive, it reduces elasticity and increases the risk
      for skin cancer.

    • Sedentary lifestyle: it leads to muscle weakness and decreased exercise
      capacity.

    • Overeating: it contributes to acid reflux disease, constipation,
      atherosclerosis, diabetes, and hypertension.

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    A , Geriatric Medicine, answered
    The magazine The Week published a feature about the world's oldest siblings and their secret to life.

    Helen is 108 years old. Eats unhealthy foods. Drinks. And smokes. Helen is a certified psychologist, a fashion expert, a former TV presenter, and a professor emeritus at New York University.

    Helen and her brothers Irving, 104, and Peter, 100, attract a lot of attention. Lee, their sister, died in 2005 at the age of 102. Together they have provided blood samples and submitted to hours of interviews with age researchers. Ironically the conclusions are inconclusive.

    One researcher noted that "the usual recommendations for a healthy life -- not smoking, not drinking, plenty of exercise, a well-balanced diet, keeping your weight down -- they apply to us average people, but not to them. Centenarians are in a class of their own."

    His centenarian subjects have been overweight; long-time smokers; exercised only moderately or not at all (researchers were quick to note that a healthy lifestyle is still important to we other mere mortals).

    You see, in order to reach the age of 100 you need a special genetic makeup.
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    A number of factors can affect a person's life span. Those include a person's genetic makeup, birth weight, lifestyle, nutrition, vaccinations, antibiotics, early childhood care, diet, income and other factors.

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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered

    A Randy Newman song says short people don't have a "reason to live," but it turns out they may outlive their taller peers. According to a recent study published by the National Academy of Sciences, people who are below 5 feet 2 inches have a greater chance of living to age 100. Researchers speculate that the gene involved with assisting in the body's recovery from oxidative stress (the cell damage that comes from the radiation we're exposed to every day, the environment, activity, and the foods we eat) is somehow related to the gene that determines height. Their guess is that people who are taller do not respond as well to oxidative stress.

    Regardless of your height, if you are concerned about longevity, new research points to interesting ways to lengthen your life.

    Prevent cardiovascular disease, which is the country's leading cause of death and disability, through exercise and resistance training.

    Reduce your calorie intake, which new research suggests can slow metabolism and cell death, helping you live longer. The studies have looked at reductions of about 25%, but if that's not realistic (or healthy) for you, shoot for 10%.

    Eat a colorful diet, which will be rich in antioxidant-packed fruits and vegetables.

    Get 30 minutes of exercise at least 3 times per week (the more, the better).

    Log 7 hours (or more) of sleep nightly to repair your cells and generate the growth hormone necessary to increase bone density and lower body fat (which has been linked to many diseases).
    This content originally appeared on doctoroz.com