Impact Of Losing Weight

Impact Of Losing Weight

Impact Of Losing Weight
Losing weight can be one of the best things you can do for your physical and emotional health. It can slash your risk of illness, help prevent a cancer diagnosis and improve your self-esteem. But not all weight loss is created equal. Losing weight too quickly and you risk malnutrition, dehydration and even hair loss. It's recommended that for effective weight loss, stick to dropping two pounds a week and always keep in mind – it's a marathon, not a sprint.

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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered
    How might losing weight affect my emotions?

    Without food as a crutch, some people who lose a lot of weight become more emotional. In this video, comedian and Dr. Oz Show guest Lisa Lampanelli discusses the emotional effects of shedding over 80 pounds.

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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered
    It shouldn't come as much of a surprise that avoiders typically have feelings of inadequacy and are hypersensitive to being negatively evaluated. Identifying with four or more of the following statements means you have strong avoidance tendencies.
    1. I avoid work activities that involve close interpersonal contact—not because of my sporadic deodorant use, but because I fear criticism or rejection.
    2. Unless I know I'm going to be liked, I'm hesitant to get involved in relationships.
    3. When I'm in social situations, I feel more inept than an umpire with a detached retina.
    4. My shirt's not coming off unless the lights are going off.
    5. All of my social situations feel like high school; I'm preoccupied with being criticized or rejected.
    6. I don't engage in risky activities because my biggest fear is the risk of embarrassment.
    7. In new interpersonal situations, I feel the same way I feel at the beach—shy, inhibited, and would do anything to be somewhere else.
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    A , Psychology, answered
    The following are suggestions of what to do if you are in a relationship and want to lose weight:
    • Communicate honestly. Tell your partner what you are trying to do, but don't expect an immediate buy-in. Just because you are calling steamed veggies your dinner, he or she may not feel the same -- don't push your agenda.
    • Continue eating together. If you are eating little pre-packaged meals and your partner is not, that doesn't mean you can't eat together. Create something like a salad that you can eat together, and then you eat yours and your partner eats what they want.
    • Try to be active together. If you are taking a walk on a weekend, ask him or her to come along, but don't guilt your partner into being active. (Additionally, vigorous sex is actually a good source of aerobic exercise -- so consider suggesting that.)
    • Don't do a cupboard purge without asking. Your better half is going to be mad as hell if he or she comes home from work and finds that the goodies are missing. This goes back to communication; this is your decision to lose weight, ideally you are on the same page -- but give your partner time to adjust.
    Change is always good, but never easy -- don't let your partner's fear of change (or love of carbs) keep you from becoming a better and healthier you. Try to keep it collaborative; don't get preachy. By taking care of you, you are, in theory, taking care of the relationship. And if it does end after the pounds are shed -- it probably wasn't working in the first place.
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    A , Psychology, answered
    When one person in a relationship makes the decision to lose weight, what can happen? Well, obviously this can be a good thing; ix -- healthier meals, healthier food in the house, more activity. If this is done together, everyone is a winner. But as with most health behavior changes, no one wants to be told what to do. Smokers don't like being told to quit; drinkers don't like being told to stop; and people who like their burgers and fries resent being told otherwise.

    At the end of the day, weight loss by one member of a relationship is not going to destroy a strong relationship. If the relationship is good, it will not only withstand such a transition, but both partners can benefit. If the relationship was already fractured, any transition will put the relationship at risk.
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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered
    Effects of Weight Loss on Sex Drive
    Weight loss, especially losing belly fat, allows your hormones to work the way they are supposed to and reignites your sex life.

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    A answered
    Being overweight, and particularly, being obese, is bad for your health, even if you're only slightly overweight. It is a major risk factor for heart disease and stroke and is linked to a higher incidence of diabetes, which you are twice as likely to develop than a person of normal weight. In addition, it is associated with several types of cancers, gout, gallbladder disease and other diseases.
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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered
    TN - How can losing 10 percent of my body weight transform my health?

    Losing 10 percent of your body weight can have dramatic health benefits. Watch as Dr. Oz explains the top five benefits of losing 10 percent of your weight.

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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered
    1 101 03 how body repais after weightloss
    Damage to your knees can be healed by weight loss - this is one way the body repairs itself.

    Watch the video to learn more from Dr. Oz about the way your body repairs itself after weight loss.


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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered

    Even if you only reduce the dosage you currently need for high blood pressure or diabetes, you’ll still save money on your prescriptions. A recent study estimated that cutting just 100 calories a day could prevent or eliminate 71.2 million cases of obesity and save $58 billion annually in the United States.

     

     


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    A answered

    Losing weight may not seem like an easy task. But research shows that you don't have to lose much to gain several cardiovascular health benefits. If you are overweight, losing only a few pounds can help reduce your risk of heart and blood vessel disease and complications of cardiovascular disease, such as heart attack and stroke. Maintaining a healthy weight may even ward off dangerous arrhythmias.