Advertisement

How common is acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS)?

The  Centers for Disease Control and Prevention  (CDC) estimates that 1.19 million people have been diagnosed with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) in the United States. Additionally, more than 1.2 million people are living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. However, approximately 12% are not aware they are infected. HIV affects about 0.4% of the U.S. population.
The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reports that 658,507 people in the United States have died from acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) between the start of the epidemic in 1981 and 2012 (the most recent year for which death data are available).In 2011, an estimated 1.2 million people were living with AIDS in this country.

According to the World Health Organization (WHO), as of December 2013, 35 million people were estimated to be living with HIV/AIDS worldwide. Of these, 31.8 million were adults, 16 million were women and 3.2 million were children.

During 2013, AIDS caused the deaths of an estimated 1.5 million people worldwide.

Continue Learning about HIV and AIDS

My Story: Maria and HIV
My Story: Maria and HIV
Maria is determined to break through the stigma around HIV. From survivor to advocate and thriver, watch her story here.
Read More
How many people with AIDS die each year?
Univ. of Nev. School of Medicine, Family MedicineUniv. of Nev. School of Medicine, Family Medicine
More than 16,000 people with AIDS die each year. The number of people with HIV who get AIDS has dec...
More Answers
How can I start PrEP?
Univ. of Nev. School of Medicine, Family MedicineUniv. of Nev. School of Medicine, Family Medicine
If you think you may be at increased risk for HIV, ask your health care provider about PrEP (pre-exp...
More Answers
Why Have HIV Transmission Rates Stayed the Same for Decades?
Why Have HIV Transmission Rates Stayed the Same for Decades?

Important: This content reflects information from various individuals and organizations and may offer alternative or opposing points of view. It should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. As always, you should consult with your healthcare provider about your specific health needs.