Healthy Skin

Healthy Skin

Healthy Skin
Staying out of the sun and away from tanning beds is the easiest way to get great-looking skin. The suns UVB and UVA rays cause skin damage, which is prematurely aging, and skin cancer. Every day you should wear a broad-spectrum sunscreen, which blocks UVB and UVA rays, with an SPF of 15 or higher. Reapply at least every two hours while outdoors. For a dewy glow, use skin-care products with 10 ingredients or less to reduce irritation, use moisturizer and feed your skin from within. Dark chocolate and antioxidant-rich foods such as cantaloupe, citrus fruits, blueberries and leafy greens improve the skin’s appearance.

Recently Answered

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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered

    While all humans have the same number of melanocytes (which produce melanin and determine skin color), those melanocytes produce different amounts of melanin. People who moved to northern climates needed more UV-B rays to make vitamin D so they produce less melanin. And over time that has gotten ingrained into the genome so northerners typically have less dark skin.

    Within 1,000 years of a population's migration from one climate to another, descendants have the correct color skin to protect and maximize nutrients.

    If you chart the evolution of skin color of populations living in one area for 500 years, the curve perfectly correlates UV radiation with skin color. The only exception are the Inuit, who have dark skin and hair even though they inhabit northern climates; that's because they eat lots of fatty fish, which provide vitamin D, so they don't need it from the sun. Our ancestors began migrating from northern Africa 250,000 years ago, so there has been lots of time for our skin types to adapt to our climate.

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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered

    Melanin is a pigment that cells in your skin create. It helps protect your deeper skin layers from the sun's ultraviolet rays. Your body produces melanin after sun exposure to protect itself.

    Use a sunscreen and wear protective clothing to safeguard your skin from the sun's harmful rays.

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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered

    Skin is a remarkable organ. It excretes chemicals to ward off bacteria and other elements that could harm the body. Skin also helps to keep the body's internal temperature consistent by adjusting to the outside temperature. In addition, skin is able to regenerate and repair itself over time, constantly protecting us from environmental damage.

     

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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered

    Skin is the largest organ of the body, covering up to 20 square feet. With the many layers included, the skin can represent up to 15% of our total body weight.

     

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    A , Plastic Surgery, answered
    I don't know this for a fact, but I suspect that celebrities either undergo laser or chemical peels, or use a drug called Benaquin cream. This is a drug that kills the pigment producing cells and is intended as a last ditch effort to even out the splotchiness that occurs in that terribly disfiguring disease called vitiligo.
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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered

    Having more melanin in your skin means that you have a little more protection from the sun, and you may be less prone to premature signs of aging. This does not mean, however, that you should avoid using sunscreen. Regardless of skin tone, dermatologists recommend applying sunscreen before going outside.

     

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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered

    Melanin, the pigment in our skin, can act as a natural sunscreen. People have different skin colors based on where their ancestors originated. Those from warmer, sunnier climates close to the equator have darker skin, because they needed a large amount of melanin to protect them from their sunny environment. Moving away from the equator to shadier, less sunny climates, people in those regions didn't have the same need for large amounts of melanin so they ended up with lighter-colored skin.

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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered

    The epidermis, or the outermost layer of skin, is constantly changing. Skin cells from the lower layers make their way to the surface and eventually fall off; a process known as natural exfoliation or desquamation. These cells are held together by protein rivets called desmosomes, and at the appropriate time, enzymes in the skin dissolve the desmosomes to allow the cells to separate and shed one-by-one. When skin is too dry, the enzymes that degrade desmosomes cannot function properly, which leads to clumps of cells that shed together, instead of single cells that shed invisibly. These clumps can be seen as flakes or scales.

     

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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered

    The color of your skin comes from the pigment melanin, which is produced by the melanocyte cells within our skin. The darker your skin, the more melanin you have.

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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered

    Apply a small amount of the questionable product to your wrist. If your skin reacts badly, you'll know the product is to blame. If it doesn't, that helps rule out an allergic reaction to your makeup, but you still might be allergic to something else.