Healthy Nose

Healthy Nose

Healthy Nose
Most nose problems happen in cold weather when the air you breathe is dry indoor air. Symptoms can be a nosebleed, dry nasal passages and sinuses, coughing and nasal congestion. Many treatments, including the use of chicken soup as a congestion cure, have developed over centuries. An additional treatment option is the use of nasal sprays to keep your nasal passages open. If you're bothered by a constantly congested nose, you may want to see an otolaryngologist.

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    The nasal septum is the small part of your face that separates your nose into left and right nostrils. The part you see in the front of your nose is cartilage covered by skin. In the back of your nose, your nasal septum is made up of four different bones.

    In most people, the nasal septum is not a straight vertical piece of cartilage but leans slightly to the right or the left. When this shift is more pronounced, it is called a "deviated septum," a condition that can cause a slightly crooked appearance to the nose and cause problems including difficulty breathing, snoring, frequent nosebleeds, a blocked nostril, and/or a lack of normal drainage from the sinuses, which can make you more prone to getting sinus infections.

    A deviated septum can be corrected with surgery, but most doctors prefer to wait until adulthood to do this operation, since the nasal septum continues to grow throughout most of the teen years.
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    A , Internal Medicine, answered
    The inside surfaces of the nose are covered with blood-filled mucous membranes that warm and humidify the air as it passes by on its way to the lungs. When cold air hits them, they tend to secrete water and mucus. The colder and drier the air, the more water and mucus need to be produced and the more the nose runs. Taking a warm shower or bath can help a runny nose because air you're taking in is already moist and warm, so the membranes can relax and stop secreting water and mucus.
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    The nose (along with the mouth) is the entrance point to your lungs and the first step in the breathing process. Sinuses are cavities located in your head that drain into the nasal cavity. As the air enters your nose, into the nasal pathway, your inhaled air passes by four sets of sinuses that are located in your head. Each of these sinuses have very little interaction with your airflow but they do drain into the nasal pathway. As the air enters your nose it passes by your cheek sinuses (the maxillary sinuses) located below your eyes, it passes around your ethmoid sinuses (located between your eyes right below the bridge of your nose), it passes under your frontal sinuses (located in your forehead above your eyes) and then in front of your sphenoid sinuses (located in the back of your nose directly above your throat).
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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered

    The nose is the body's first line of defense against airborne invaders, so it should come as no surprise that there are colonies of germs living inside the nasal cavity. For the most part, bacteria and debris don't get very far into the body because there is a very efficient protective mechanism inside the nose. Tiny hairs called cilia move ever so slightly to snare and trap what they can in mucous-coated hairs, keeping anything from reaching the breathing passages and gaining access to the bloodstream.

     


     

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    A , Geriatric Medicine, answered
    Sneezing is a localized reaction of the sinuses to irritants. You may be more sensitive to these irritants. I would suggest you conduct an allergy panel to determine if you have specific sensitivities to various environmental triggers. I also suggest you review your surroundings. Do you have pets and are they allowed in the bedroom? Pets should not be allowed in the bedroom, and your bedroom needs to always be clean and aerated. Try these:

    1. For thirty minutes before going to bed, open all windows and doors to the bedroom, and aerate the room.
    2. You may also want to switch to a hypoallergenic detergent to wash your bedding and clothes.
    3. Avoid dairy products, wheat, overly stimulating foods, fried foods, simple carbohydrates, and sugars.
    4. Drink beet top tea as source of water.
    5. Drink ginger tea.

    For general allergies, acupuncture and Chinese herbal remedies are very effective. I recommend you consult with a licensed practitioner.
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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered
    You have small hairs called cilia that continually milk secretions up your nose towards the sinuses. The temperature in the nose is usually around 80 F (put down the thermometer; trust us on this one). But it can drop during cold weather, thus paralyzing these hairs. When the cilia cannot beat fast enough, the secretions drain down with gravity and your nose "runs" faster than Forrest Gump on a country dirt road.
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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered
    Healthy Hygiene for Nose and Sinus
    Picking your nose and plucking hairs out of it can put you at risk for serious infection. Watch the video to learn more.


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    A , Pharmacy, answered
    Nasal washes and sinus irrigations use salt water to physically clean out your nasal cavity. The procedure involves leaning your head to the side and pouring a salt water solution into one nostril, letting it flow out the other. This process helps to dislodge and flush out mucus and other congesting materials in the sinuses, clearing congestion caused by colds, allergies or other causes.

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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered
    Nose-Picking
    When you pick your nose you traumatize the opening of the airway that allows bacteria and viruses to enter.



     
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    Nasal irrigation is a technique some people use to help with chronic sinus or allergy problems. Essentially, it is a process using a saltwater solution to flush out the nostrils (or nasal cavities). There are several products used to do this, the most basic including bulb syringe, squeeze bottle or neti pot. The fluid flows into one nasal cavity through to the other nostril. The idea behind nasal irrigation is to help thin out any mucous and debris in the nose and help the nasal cilia (tiny hair-like structures in the nose that defend against infectious materials) to work better. Overall, nasal irrigation has been shown to be an effective way to relieve sinus symptoms. It may be used instead of, or in addition to, other treatments such as antibiotics or nasal steroids.