Healthy Hair and Scalp

Healthy Hair and Scalp

Healthy Hair and Scalp
Want some expert tips on how to maintain your healthy head of hair? First, you can start with good nutrition. By eating two to three servings of protein a day you can maintain a normal hair growth cycle. Wear wide-brimmed hats when you’re outside to protect your scalp from sunburn and sun damage. Other ways to maintain and care for your hair include proper styling tools and hair care products that won’t damage and over-dry your hair. Read on for more hair secrets and advice from our team of experts.

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    Dry hair is usually not a serious problem. With some hair care changes, you can still have healthy-looking hair. However, the condition can be caused by serious health problems, such as anorexia nervosa, Menkes kinky hair syndrome (a disease caused by copper deficiency in the body), and hypothyroidism. A physician can determine if your hair dryness is related to a more serious medical problem.

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    Other illnesses can cause or worsen dry hair. For example, if you suffer from a vitamin deficiency which leads to scurvy, or a protein deficiency which leads to kwashiorkor disease, your hair will become noticeably drier. Thyroid problems, anorexia nervosa, and copper deficiency (known as Menkes kinky hair syndrome) can cause changes in the condition of your hair. If you notice these changes, you should consult a physician.
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    Dry hair occurs when your hair does not have enough sebum to keep it glossy. Sebum is the oil produced in the glands of the body, including on the scalp. Without enough sebum, the layers of each hair strand are more vulnerable to damage from the environment. Hair may become dry due to excessive washing and drying, or may be a sign of something more serious, like malnutrition or thyroid problems.
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    Hair oils are produced primarily by the sebaceous glands associated with the hair follicles and are protective to the hair shafts. The amount of hair oil can vary widely from one individual to the next. When one's hair tends to be overly oily, there a couple of things that one can do to address the issue. First, try washing your hair more frequently than you are currently accustomed to doing so; washing one's hair on a daily basis is not necessarily too often. Second, if cleansing your hair on a more frequent basis does not help, try a quality shampoo that is made expressly for oily hair. If neither of these methods produces acceptable results, consultation with a qualified medical professional may bear some consideration.

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    The causes of dry hair are numerous. The most common causes are over washing, over blow drying, and use of harsh products on the hair. An improper diet and dry air can also lead to dry hair. Even medical conditions, such as Menkes kinky hair syndrome, hypothyroidism, scurvy, and anorexia nervosa, can cause the hair to be too dry.

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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered
    To diagnose dry hair, your dermatologist may start by taking your medical history, including asking questions about your diet, hair grooming habits, and other symptoms you might be experiencing in addition to dry hair. Your doctor may also do a physical exam, noting your overall health, as well as how brittle and dry your hair feels and appears. Your dermatologist may also exam of some of your hair under a microscope and/or order blood tests to diagnose dry hair and to rule out other health problems.
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    Woman Sitting Outdoors
    If you just got a bad hair cut, hair seems like it does not grow at all. On the other hand, hair that you shave every day seems to grow at great speed.

    Ignoring these perceptual differences, human hair grows at a fairly consistent rate of about half a millimeter per day, or about half an inch each month (more specifically, the study says hair grows at 0.44 mm per day). Depending on your age, hair may grow faster or slower. Genetics and your hormonal state (for example, pregnancy seems to have an affect on hair) also affect growth. Still, half a millimeter per day is a good average.

    This means the maximum rate of annual hair growth is about 6 inches. If you have short hair and are thinking how nice it would be to have hair down to your waist, then you are going to have to wait about four-years.
    Woman Sitting Outdoors
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    A , Internal Medicine, answered
    Some people have difficulty growing their hair beyond a certain length because they have a short active phase of growth. On the other hand, people with very long hair have a long active phase of growth. The hair on the arms, legs, eyelashes, and eyebrows have a very short active growth phase of about 30-45 days, explaining why they are so much shorter than scalp hair. Transplanted hair doesn't know it's in a new location and so eyelash transplants from the scalp need to be trimmed every few weeks to avoid looking like a tarantula.

    By the way, while men tend to prefer women with long hair (ever see a painting of Eve with a buzz cut?), women, especially as they age, seem to prefer wearing shorter hair. After all, long hair on a mature, sophisticated woman can seem about as appropriate as shoveling soup with your fingers. More importantly, our hair tells us a ton about our overall health status, as the growth or loss of hair can signal other malfunctions going on inside of our bodies.
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    Hair is a non-living body structure composed primarily of a protein called keratin that is produced by organs within the skin called hair follicles. The human body has roughly 5,000,000 hair follicles, about 100,000 of which are within the skin of the scalp. This number remains relatively constant from birth through adulthood, although with typical pattern baldness they may stop producing long visible hairs.
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    A , Internal Medicine, answered
    Children's hair doesn't get greasy like adults' hair does, because their sebaceous glands do not produce significant amounts of oil until puberty. So you only need to wash it every few days. We recommend a gentle, tear-free shampoo. If your child has long hair, conditioner or spray-on detangler can help you avoid knots. Use a soft brush for fine hair. African American babies definitely don't need a hair wash more than once a week, since their skin and scalp are quite dry, and washing it can make it even drier.