Grief & Emotional Health

Grief & Emotional Health

Grief & Emotional Health
Everyone feels loss at times, but when we lose a loved one, the feeling is deeper -- grief, a normal emotion. When feeling grief, it's best for your emotional health for you to stay in touch with family members who can provide support; make an effort to keep a regular schedule and eat a healthy diet, get regular exercise. Focus on taking care of yourself -- and if you're having trouble getting past your grief, see a therapist. With some gentle guidance, you can get on with your life -- and still enjoy your wonderful memories.

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    A answered
    If you are having difficulty coping with someone's death, it may help to spend time with people who knew the person who died. Other people who knew the person who died will be grieving too, and can relate to how you are feeling. They can also talk with you about the person who died and share memories with you -- which can be a powerful tool for processing the death.  
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    A , Psychiatry, answered
    What are some warning signs that I should seek help for my grief?
    Some warning signs that someone should seek help for grief include persistent sadness, sleeplessness and depression that won't pass. In this video, psychiatrist G. Richard Smith, MD, explains the symptoms of grief to watch for, and how to get help. 
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    The death of a relative or other loved one, the death of a pet, the break up with a partner, all of these are extremely emotional events that cause a great deal of trauma to all human beings, well or unwell. For those with serious mental illness (SMI) these events may be even more traumatic.

    Do not exclude your ill relative from funerals or other expressions of grief, thinking to save them. At these times it is more important than ever to be inclusive. Assign another family member or friend to accompany your ill relative if there is a special gathering or other event.
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    A , Psychology, answered
    Kids (and adults) often regress emotionally and behaviorally when under stress. This type of behavior is not uncommon, but often when parents are in the middle of their own grief, they miss their child's behaviors as a symptom of grief as to why their child is misbehaving and punish them, sometimes further squashing their child's processing of grief.
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    A , Adolescent Medicine, answered

    Talk with a child in language he or she can understand. Complex medical terms are less effective than simple language describing the illness or circumstances surrounding the death. Use language that reflects what the child can see, hear, touch, and feel.

    Try to confirm that the child understands what you have said. Let the child explain back to you how he or she comprehends what has happened. Then help clarify any areas of confusion or misunderstanding that still exist.

    Allow time for a child to express his or her feelings and other grief reactions. Many grief reactions are typically associated with a serious illness or death in the family. These reactions can and should be shared among family members. Very young children may not have words for their grief. As a result, they may express their grief through drawings, behavior, or other means.

    Encourage children to ask questions and be prepared to give honest, simple answers. Listen carefully to a child’s questions and try to understand what is being asked, as well as what is not being asked.

    As an adult, be a good observer. Look and see how each child is behaving. Don’t rush in with explanations. Usually, it’s more helpful to ask exploring questions than to give quick answers.

    Help the child commemorate the life of the person that has died. Sharing memories will help to facilitate healthy grieving. Creative writing, telling stories, planting the loved one’s favorite flowers, and other activities provide healthy outlets for grief and can be ways to maintain happy memories.

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    A , Internal Medicine, answered

    Docs are taught that the normal time period for mourning the loss of a loved one is six months to a year after the death. So it may be natural to experience depressive symptoms during that time. But I want to make it clear that you should never feel pressure to shake the pain after a certain time period. Illusions are also a part of normal grief. An illusion is a misperception of actual external stimuli. Delusions or hallucinations are never normal. The key is getting to the point where you can decide whether the discomfort is enough to carry on with other aspects of your life. That takes many people one to six months, but it takes others longer. Don't hesitate to seek help.

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    A , Health Education, answered

    Suffering sucks. Yet, it is so much a part of our lives that Buddha claimed its inevitability as the first of his Four Noble Truths. There is no denying it: life is painful. Then again, more than anything else, how we deal with life's pain defines who we are.

    According to William Somerset Maugham, "It is not true that suffering ennobles the character; happiness does that sometimes, but suffering, for the most part, makes men petty and vindictive." While we do not choose to undergo misfortune, we do decide how to react to those events. Suffering does not necessitate degeneration. Negative experiences can also trigger something positive within us. Crisis offers opportunity for change, and pain can be the catalyst for transformation, our greatest tool in the work of ego transcendence.

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    A Social Work, answered on behalf of
    It can, but only if you can learn and grow from it. Once you have the learning it is yours and you leave the situation where you feel suffering that much stronger and wiser. I don't recommend seeking suffering to learn and grow into a better person, but if you should happen to feel suffering you might want to start with awareness and move into acceptance and action and leave the suffering behind. And who says you are not a better person already? It's up to you to own your own identity, which comes from the inside and not out there in someone elses opinions.
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    A Social Work, answered on behalf of

    In my opinion the answer would be no. The following is a quote by GURUDJIEFF

    "Nothing can be attained without suffering but at the sametime one must begin by sacrificing suffering."

    We all encounter life experiences like death of a loved one, loss of a relationship, loss of a job, financial loss, loss of a physical ability, or a myriad of stressful circumstances sometimes leading to appropriate but unwanted feelings. Feelings of grief, loss of control, worry, and physical pain are some examples. Suffering is usually associated with the persistence of these feelings over time.Typically, there will always be feelings associated with our experiences as we live our lives. From my experience the "antidote" to suffering is gratitude. Look for the blessing in the situation or what is occuring now in your life. Sometimes the only blessing we can identify is gratitude for your  last breath, so start there. There is research showing that people who keep a gratitude journal daily report an increased sense of happiness and well being in their lives, so you may want to start one. Suffering can also be a teacher so be open to learn from it. If you are having trouble moving past your suffering there are support groups available in many communities where people with similar experiences can talk and share their feelings with people that care and are able to understand your pain. If suffering begins to intefere with your daily functioning you may want to consult a professional for an evaluation in order to move through the pain as quickly as possible. A good place to start is your medical doctor. If you want the convenience of a consultation with a medical or mental health professional you can from the privacy of your home or office contact MDLiveCare for a tele-therapy consultation. Suffering is often a state of feeling "stuck", so taking some action is a key first step to letting go of your suffering.

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    A , Health Education, answered

    One of the most common ways we (yes, I do mean I, but I have a sneaking suspicion you do it too) deal with any sort of is comfort is addiction. It can be as subtle as the cell phone, or as insidious as Internet porn, but everybody has something. By evading legitimate suffering, we fail to address our core issues and miss a crucial opportunity for self-revelation. In addition, what we turn to as a means of protecting ourselves ends up hurting us even more. By using an addiction to dull or avoid sensation, we may temporarily escape something painful. However, in the process, we lose our ability to respond to an experience, because we will never really know what it feels like.