Glucosamine

Glucosamine

Glucosamine
Glucosamine is a natural amino sugar that is built into cartilage and other tissues. Glucosamine keeps cartilage healthy and may help repair cartilage damage. As a supplement glucosamine is used in the treatment for arthritis and overall joint support. Oral supplements come as glucosamine sulfate, glucosamine hydrochloride and N-acetyl glucosamine. Topical, rectal and injectable are other forms of glucosamine. As with any herbal supplements please consult your health provider for treatment, correct dosage, benefits and risk factors.

Recently Answered

  • 1 Answer
    A
    A , Pharmacy, answered
    Although many people take glucosamine and chondroitin for osteoarthritis, it's not yet clear whether the combo actually reduces pain and slows joint damage. Taking glucosamine with blood thinners is considered unsafe, since the combination can put you at risk for bleeding and bruising. Glucosamine may worsen asthma, and if you have diabetes, it's important to monitor glucose levels carefully while taking this supplement. There have also been concerns that glucosamine may raise blood pressure and cholesterol levels, but human studies haven't confirmed them.
  • 1 Answer
    A
    A , Pharmacy, answered

    As a nutritional supplement, glucosamine is not regulated by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, an organization with rigorous testing and manufacturing standards. Therefore, all of the potential side effects of this supplement may not be known. Based on the limited research available, it appears that glucosamine is generally tolerated with minimal side effects for periods of up to three years. Possible mild side effects include: mild gastrointestinal symptoms, such as heartburn, nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, constipation, abdominal pain and gas. Drowsiness, insomnia and headaches likewise are associated with the use of glucosamine. Glucosamine may also increase bleeding risk and blood sugar levels, particularly in people who have risk factors for these conditions (such as bleeding disorders, use of medications that prevent blood clots and diabetes). Other possible side effects include: skin and nail changes (such as sun sensitivity, nail toughening and skin reactions); temporary elevations in blood pressure or heart rate; and heart palpitations. Animal studies suggest that glucosamine use may increase the risk of developing cataracts. Finally, there have been isolated cases of kidney and liver damage after taking glucosamine.

  • 1 Answer
    A
    A , Pharmacy, answered
    There seems to be little evidence that glucosamine causes tingling in the hands and feet. In a large multicenter trial of the supplement, which has been studied for its possible benefits for people with osteoarthritis, patients reported mostly mild side effects such as upset stomach. Other side effects might include heartburn, nausea, indigestion, gas and bloating.
  • 1 Answer
    A
    A , Pharmacy, answered

    There is no need to avoid certain foods, beverages, or activities while taking glucosamine.

    If you are allergic to shellfish or iodine, you should not take glucosamine supplements that come from natural sources. Instead you should look for products containing glucosamine that are manufactured in a laboratory.
    Due to a lack of data on the potentially harmful effects of glucosamine on certain populations, you should not attempt to get pregnant or breastfeed while taking glucosamine.

    Surgical or dental procedures should be avoided while on glucosamine because of the increased risk of bleeding associated with this supplement. If necessary, glucosamine can be discontinued for two weeks prior to the scheduled procedure.

    If possible, you should not take herbs, supplements, or other medications that may interact with glucosamine. These include medicines that may increase the side effects of glucosamine or other drugs (such as medications to control diabetes, prevent blood clots, or remove excess fluid from the body) and that may become less effective when used with glucosamine (such as medications to treat pain or fight cancer). Chitosan, a supplement used for weight loss, may decrease the body's absorption of glucosamine and should likewise be avoided.

    If you are unable to stop taking certain medications, you may need to discuss alternative treatment options or more frequent monitoring with your healthcare provider. For example, if you take medicines to control diabetes you may need to test your blood sugars more frequently. Similarly, if you take drugs such as warfarin to prevent blood clots, your doctor should follow you closely for side effects.

  • 1 Answer
    A
    A , Pharmacy, answered

    Chronic venous insufficiency is a condition in which the veins do not effectively return blood from the legs to the heart. Symptoms mostly occur in the legs and can include swelling, pain, color changes, and skin ulcers, among others. In one small clinical trial, 30 days of treatment with glucosamine improved swelling and other measures of this disease in 70 to 90 percent of the people studied. How this happens is not known. Further research is needed before recommending glucosamine to all people with chronic venous insufficiency.

  • 2 Answers
    A
    A , Pharmacy, answered
    There are several kinds of glucosamine supplements: glucosamine hydrochloride, glucosamine sulfate and N-acetyl-glucosamine.

    One study that found some pain-relief benefit for a glucosamine/chondroitin combination used glucosamine hydrochloride. However, other studies have found that glucosamine sulfate may be more effective for treating osteoarthritis than glucosamine hydrochloride.

    You should talk to your doctor about whether a certain type of glucosamine supplement would work best for your condition.
    See All 2 Answers
  • 1 Answer
    A
    A , Pharmacy, answered
    If you take glucosamine for osteoarthritis, the typical dose is 500 milligrams (mg) three times a day, or 1.5 grams (1,500 mg) once a day. To reduce the chance of having gastrointestinal symptoms, take glucosamine with food.
  • 1 Answer
    A
    A , Pharmacy, answered

    Glucosamine is a nutritional supplement so its manufacturing process, safety, and potency are not regulated by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. The purity of this drug is therefore not guaranteed. In fact, there have been reports in which nutritional substances such as glucosamine were made with toxic metals or other substances. In addition, a supplement may have more or less of the active ingredient than what is indicated on the label. It is therefore important to speak with your pharmacist or healthcare provider about safe, reliable sources of glucosamine. You can also look for supplements that follow the rules of Good Manufacturing Practices.

    As with any drug, there is a risk of allergic reactions ranging from hives to life-threatening throat swelling when you take glucosamine. Because some forms of glucosamine come from shellfish, people with shellfish or iodine allergies should not take glucosamine unless it is man-made in a laboratory (and therefore does not contain shellfish).

    Certain conditions may be exacerbated by glucosamine. People with asthma, diabetes, bleeding conditions, high blood pressure, and possibly high cholesterol should use glucosamine with caution. In addition, glucosamine can interact with prescription or over-the-counter drugs, resulting in a greater risk of medication side effects. You should therefore speak with your healthcare provider about the potential risks of combining glucosamine with your regular medications.

    While glucosamine is generally well-tolerated, side effects can occur. These include mild gastrointestinal symptoms; drowsiness; insomnia; headache; skin and nail changes; temporary elevations in heart rate or blood pressure; heart palpitations; an increased risk of cataracts; and possibly liver and kidney damage.

  • 4 Answers
    A
    A , Internal Medicine, answered

    Glucosamine is an amino-sugar that your body naturally makes. It acts as a building block for making and repairing cartilage and helping it hold water. Retaining water is important for keeping your joints nicely lubricated and allowing you to move as smoothly as Gene Kelly. If the cartilage in your joints is rough and ragged from osteoarthritis, taking glucosamine may help rebuild it and reduce pain and stiffness. Randomized studies are not definitive, but many swear it helps their bodies repair and maintain cartilage.

    See All 4 Answers
  • 2 Answers
    A
    A Nutrition & Dietetics, answered on behalf of
    The body naturally manufactures glucosamine and chondroitin, both of which promote joint health and support healthy joint movement. Glucosamine is thought to promote the formation and repair of cartilage while it is believed that chondroitin helps prevent the breakdown of cartilage. Glucosamine supplements are derived from shellfish shells; chondroitin supplements are generally made from cow cartilage. Because binge eaters have an added risk of joint damage from carrying excess weight, glucosamine chondroitin can be taken to restore joint health and to prevent further damage.

    Take as recommended on package with food/meal. Different brands and types vary in dosage and number of capsules or pills.
    See All 2 Answers