Ginger

Ginger

Ginger
Ginger supplements are most commonly used to relieve nausea, motion sickness and vomiting. Ginger can be used orally, topically and intramuscularly for a variety of other conditions. Learn more about ginger from our experts.

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    A , Naturopathic Medicine, answered
    A randomized clinical trial has confirmed what many people suspect -- that ginger can decrease nausea caused by chemotherapy. The effect goes beyond that provided by standard anti-vomiting drugs.

    Patients taking ginger before chemotherapy found a 45% reduction in nausea and discomfort. This study shows the benefit and safety of using ginger with chemotherapy and anti-nausea medications.

    According to the study's author, Dr. Julie L. Ryan of the University of Rochester, the best results corresponded to a quarter to a half teaspoon of ground ginger. She added that either the ginger that comes in spice bottles or the ginger capsules sold in health food stores would probably work.

    They then rated the severity of their nausea four times a day. Those taking the ginger had a reduction of about 45 percent in severity compared with a previous round of chemotherapy in which they did not take the ginger. Those on the placebo had almost no change.
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    A , Naturopathic Medicine, answered
    A randomized clinical trial has confirmed what many people suspect -- that ginger can decrease nausea caused by chemotherapy. The mechanism underlying ginger's purported antiemetic activity is unknown, but there is speculation of a direct effect on the gastrointestinal tract, and one involving the central nervous system cannot be ruled out either since several of ginger's components antagonize serotonin type 3 receptors. In vitro studies (cell studies) suggest that ginger may produce its anti-inflammatory effect by inhibiting arachidonic acid metabolism in both the cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase pathways.
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    A , General Practice, answered
    What medications can interact with ginger?
    When used in cooking, ginger doesn't tend to interact with medications; but in supplement form, it's more potent. In this video, integrative medicine specialist Tieraona Low Dog, MD, explains which medications may be impacted by ginger supplements.
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    A , Alternative & Complementary Medicine, answered
    What are the benefits of ginger?
    Ginger is ideal for treating stress in that it helps reduce cortisol levels, helps to calm the central nervous system, and aids in digestion. Watch acupuncturist and herbalist Mary Sabo explain these benefits, and how to make a soothing ginger tea.
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    A , Gastroenterology, answered
    How does ginger work as a stomach remedy?
    Ginger has been used for centuries as a stomach remedy for nausea, bloating, and overall stomach upset. In this video, gastroenterologist Roshini Raj, MD, explains some of the healthy benefits of ginger, and how you can work it into your diet. 
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    A answered
    Ginger is an ancient perennial plant. The thickened underground stem (rhizome) of the ginger plant, commonly called ginger root, has been used extensively for both culinary and medicinal purposes. Currently, ginger is grown in Africa, India, China and Jamaica for commercial trade.

    Preparations of dried ginger rhizome can be used to:
    • treat impaired digestion and gastric indigestion (dyspepsia)
    • prevent motion sickness
    The dried rhizome of ginger is available in a variety of product types. The recommended daily dose of ginger is the equivalent of two to four grams of the dried rhizome. No time limitation for using ginger supplements has been specified; thus, ginger may be used as needed.
     
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    A , Healthcare, answered
    Ginger (zingiber officinale) has been used throughout history as a pain reliever for arthritis and other related ailments. According to a study published in the journal Arthritis and Rheumatism, extracts of this root spice has proved to be as effective as conventional painkillers in a clinical trial. Researchers tested the supplement on 250 people with osteoarthritis. Over a six week period, some were given a 255 milligram dose of the dietary supplement twice a day. The rest were given a placebo. Two-thirds of those given the ginger pills reported relief from pain.
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    A , Gastroenterology, answered
    We have good clinical evidence suggesting that ginger is effective in motion sickness and pregnancy induced nausea, and some studies suggest it useful in post operative nausea.

    So how do I use ginger in my practice and my life? My own pantry features candied ginger -- a sugar cube-sized lump quells any transient nausea. I advise patients with nausea to try fresh ginger tea, and for those patients needing portability, ginger snaps (the nasty dry ones in the paper bag packaging) and the candied ginger work great. However, don’t be fooled; most ginger ale has little or no ginger.

    Caution: some authors suggest that dried ginger is not safe in pregnancy and may increase bleeding tendencies, so take caution with use around surgery or with anticoagulant therapy.
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    A , Geriatric Medicine, answered
    Ginger has been shown to soothe the digestive lining and balance gastric juices. Make ginger tea by slicing fresh ginger root into two-inch long slices and boiling in one cup of water for five minutes. Strain out the ginger and sip the tea slowly.
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    Some research suggests that ginger, a relative of turmeric, can help control blood sugar. It's known for its anti-inflammatory properties -- a powerful benefit, since inflammation increases the risk of coronary heart disease, the leading cause of death among people with diabetes.