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How are gestational trophoblastic tumors staged?

Staging of gestational trophoblastic tumors is the process of classifying the tumors based on their extent of spread. One system classifies the tumors from stage I to IV depending on the extent of spread: stage I is limited to the uterus, whereas the other stages are characterized by spread outside the uterus.

Another system classifies GTTs as high-risk or low-risk, based on the extent of spread plus several other factors that are important for prognosis, such as age or number of chemotherapy drugs tried unsuccessfully. Low-risk tumors have a better prognosis than high-risk. Yet another system combines the two, adding an A or B for low-risk and high-risk, respectively, to the four-stages system. For example, a stage IIIB tumor has spread to the lungs and is considered high-risk.

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