Garlic

Garlic

Garlic
Garlic is used as an herbal treatment for conditions of the heart, such as high blood pressure, high cholesterol and hardening of the arteries. As with any herbal remedies, the effectiveness of this treatment is not widely documented, so best to consult with your doctor on using garlic supplements to treat blood pressure, cholesterol or any other conditions. Learn more about garlic from our experts.

Recently Answered

  • 2 Answers
    A
    A answered

    Garlic may improve resistance to infections. Garlic appears to be effective against many kinds of microbes that cause infections. Allicin, one of the main biologically active compounds of garlic, is an antibiotic. At least against one bacterial species, allicin is more potent than penicillin.

    In the test tube, extracts of allicin can disable infection-causing amoebas by inhibiting key processes that many microbes need to cause infections.

    Test-tube studies show garlic extracts to be protective of tissue against certain viruses. One study found that the garlic compounds ajoene and allicin were the most effective ingredients of garlic extracts against herpes simplex, common cold and a number of other viruses.

    See All 2 Answers
  • 1 Answer
    A
    A , Fitness, answered
    Garlic extract and its constituent parts (allicin, s-allyl cysteine) have been used for applications ranging from cholesterol management to inhibiting lethal methicillin resistant staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) staph infections.

    Strangely, test subjects and I have had the best fat-loss results with extracts designed to deliver relatively high doses of allicin. Allicin, if delivered in a stable form, appears to have the ability to inhibit fat regain.
  • 1 Answer
    A
    A answered

    Garlic may be useful in treating fungus infections. In several studies, even in small quantities, the garlic compounds ajoene, diallyl trisulfide -- a garlic extract containing allicin -- and a number of other sulfuric garlic compounds inhibited fungi by interfering with fungus metabolism.

    With a cream containing 0.4% ajoene from garlic, one study was able to cure 100% of patients with athlete's foot over the course of two weeks.

  • 1 Answer
    A
    A , Pharmacy, answered
    Although garlic does seem to have some cholesterol-lowering effect, research is inadequate to explain exactly how it accomplishes this goal. Garlic does not reduce cholesterol to as high a degree as a combined treatment of a low-fat diet and statins, cholesterol-lowering prescription drugs. This more conventional therapy is two to 10 times more effective than garlic. Garlic may present an attractive alternative or supplement to conventional treatment because of its low incidence of side effects.

  • 1 Answer
    A

    Multiple studies in humans have reported small reductions in total blood cholesterol and low-density lipoproteins ("bad cholesterol") over short periods of time (4 to 12 weeks). Effects on high-density lipoproteins ("good cholesterol") are unclear. This remains an area of controversy.

    You should read product labels, and discuss all therapies with a qualified healthcare provider. Natural Standard information does not constitute medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment.



    For more information visit https://naturalmedicines.therapeuticresearch.com/
  • 1 Answer
    A

    People with a known allergy to garlic, any of its ingredients, or to other members of the Liliaceae (lily) family, including hyacinth, tulip, onion, leek, and chives, should avoid garlic. Allergic reactions have been reported with garlic taken by mouth, inhaled, or applied to the skin. Some of these reactions are severe including throat swelling and difficulty breathing (anaphylaxis). It has been suggested that some cases of asthma from inhaling garlic may be due to mites on the garlic. Fresh garlic applied to the skin may be more likely to cause rashes than garlic extract.

    You should read product labels, and discuss all therapies with a qualified healthcare provider. Natural Standard information does not constitute medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment.



    For more information visit https://naturalmedicines.therapeuticresearch.com/
  • 1 Answer
    A
    A , Pharmacy, answered
    Do not take garlic if you know you are allergic to garlic or other members of the lily family, such as onion. Doctors do not recommend this supplement for pregnant or breastfeeding women. Consult with your doctor if you are breastfeeding, pregnant, or may become pregnant while on this supplement. Do not take garlic if you have hemophilia or for two weeks before surgery, due to an increased danger from bleeding. Avoid garlic if you have a stomach ulcer or receive HIV/AIDS treatment.

  • 1 Answer
    A

    Garlic is likely safe during pregnancy in amounts usually eaten in food, based on historical use. However, garlic supplements or large amounts of garlic should be avoided during pregnancy due to a possible increased risk of bleeding. In addition, early animal studies suggest that garlic may cause contraction of the uterus. Many tinctures contain high levels of alcohol, and should be avoided during pregnancy.

    Garlic is likely safe during breastfeeding in amounts usually eaten in food, based on historical use. However, some mothers who take garlic supplements report increased nursing time, milk odor, and reduced feeding by the infant. The safety of garlic supplements during breastfeeding is not known.

    You should read product labels, and discuss all therapies with a qualified healthcare provider. Natural Standard information does not constitute medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment.

  • 1 Answer
    A
    A , Pharmacy, answered
    Because garlic can reduce your blood's clotting ability, other prescription, over-the-counter, and herbal drugs that accomplish the same goal may amplify this effect, resulting in increased danger when bleeding. These include antiplatelets (clopidogrel and ticlopidine), anticoagulants (heparin and warfarin), aspirin, ibuprofen, naproxen, danshen, devil's claw, eleuthero, ginger (in large amounts), ginkgo, horse chestnut, panax ginseng, papain, red clover, and saw palmetto. Drugs to treat HIV/AIDS may not work as effectively if taken with garlic. Also avoid taking garlic while you are on these other medications: Isoniazid, Saquinavir, birth control pills, cyclosporine, and any drugs processed through the liver.

  • 1 Answer
    A
    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered
    Garlic microbes

    Garlic has long been touted for its health benefits, including its ability to kill intestinal parasites. In this video, Dr. Oz guest Dr. Linda Lee reveals whether or not garlic supplements really do the trick.