Garlic

Garlic

Garlic
Garlic is used as an herbal treatment for conditions of the heart, such as high blood pressure, high cholesterol and hardening of the arteries. As with any herbal remedies, the effectiveness of this treatment is not widely documented, so best to consult with your doctor on using garlic supplements to treat blood pressure, cholesterol or any other conditions. Learn more about garlic from our experts.

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    Garlic may improve resistance to infections. Garlic appears to be effective against many kinds of microbes that cause infections. Allicin, one of the main biologically active compounds of garlic, is an antibiotic. At least against one bacterial species, allicin is more potent than penicillin.

    In the test tube, extracts of allicin can disable infection-causing amoebas by inhibiting key processes that many microbes need to cause infections.

    Test-tube studies show garlic extracts to be protective of tissue against certain viruses. One study found that the garlic compounds ajoene and allicin were the most effective ingredients of garlic extracts against herpes simplex, common cold and a number of other viruses.

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    A , Fitness, answered
    Garlic extract and its constituent parts (allicin, s-allyl cysteine) have been used for applications ranging from cholesterol management to inhibiting lethal methicillin resistant staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) staph infections.

    Strangely, test subjects and I have had the best fat-loss results with extracts designed to deliver relatively high doses of allicin. Allicin, if delivered in a stable form, appears to have the ability to inhibit fat regain.
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    Garlic may be useful in treating fungus infections. In several studies, even in small quantities, the garlic compounds ajoene, diallyl trisulfide -- a garlic extract containing allicin -- and a number of other sulfuric garlic compounds inhibited fungi by interfering with fungus metabolism.

    With a cream containing 0.4% ajoene from garlic, one study was able to cure 100% of patients with athlete's foot over the course of two weeks.

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    Because garlic can reduce your blood's clotting ability, other prescription, over-the-counter, and herbal drugs that accomplish the same goal may amplify this effect, resulting in increased danger when bleeding. These include antiplatelets (clopidogrel and ticlopidine), anticoagulants (heparin and warfarin), aspirin, ibuprofen, naproxen, danshen, devil's claw, eleuthero, ginger (in large amounts), ginkgo, horse chestnut, panax ginseng, papain, red clover, and saw palmetto. Drugs to treat HIV/AIDS may not work as effectively if taken with garlic. Also avoid taking garlic while you are on these other medications: Isoniazid, Saquinavir, birth control pills, cyclosporine, and any drugs processed through the liver.

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    Although garlic does seem to have some cholesterol-lowering effect, research is inadequate to explain exactly how it accomplishes this goal. Garlic does not reduce cholesterol to as high a degree as a combined treatment of a low-fat diet and statins, cholesterol-lowering prescription drugs. This more conventional therapy is two to 10 times more effective than garlic. Garlic may present an attractive alternative or supplement to conventional treatment because of its low incidence of side effects.

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    Do not take garlic if you know you are allergic to garlic or other members of the lily family, such as onion. Doctors do not recommend this supplement for pregnant or breastfeeding women. Consult with your doctor if you are breastfeeding, pregnant, or may become pregnant while on this supplement. Do not take garlic if you have hemophilia or for two weeks before surgery, due to an increased danger from bleeding. Avoid garlic if you have a stomach ulcer or receive HIV/AIDS treatment.

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    Garlic is considered safe, and in normal food amounts is considered healthy for pregnant or nursing women. However, it does have blood thinning effects in large doses, which mean it should be discontinued a week before surgery. This can be an issue if you are anticipating a C-section. Also, if you have gestational diabetes, note that garlic may affect blood sugar; you should let your doctor know you are taking garlic supplements, especially if you are prescribed medication like insulin to treat the diabetes. 
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    Garlic microbes

    Garlic has long been touted for its health benefits, including its ability to kill intestinal parasites. In this video, Dr. Oz guest Dr. Linda Lee reveals whether or not garlic supplements really do the trick.


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    A , Healthcare, answered

    Garlic, affectionately known as the “stinking rose,” has been called the most promising anti-cancer agent we have to date.  The same elements that give garlic its powerful scent also give it the disease-preventing power.


    Garlic appears to have antimicrobial and immunostimulating properties and may give some relief of symptoms of colds or upper respiratory problems.  This occurs as garlic stimulates the mucus-producing vagus nerve reflexes. 

    You can find garlic in a variety of forms, including fresh, powder, and pills, however, raw garlic may be the most potent.

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    Garlic comes in the form of a bulb segmented into cloves, which is suitable for cooking or raw consumption, or several processed forms, including capsules, concentrates, extracts, liquids, powders, and tablets. Follow all instructions and warnings on the package of your garlic. Doctors recommend splitting up your daily dose over three to four times a day. You may take garlic without regard to food or water. Do not take garlic with any medications that may interact with it, especially blood thinners and HIV/AIDS drugs.