Garlic

Garlic

Garlic
Garlic is used as an herbal treatment for conditions of the heart, such as high blood pressure, high cholesterol and hardening of the arteries. As with any herbal remedies, the effectiveness of this treatment is not widely documented, so best to consult with your doctor on using garlic supplements to treat blood pressure, cholesterol or any other conditions. Learn more about garlic from our experts.

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    The following cautions should be considered before using garlic: Situations in which use of garlic is not advised:
    • Do not use garlic if you have inflammation of the stomach (gastroenteritis).
    • Do not take large amounts of garlic during pregnancy; in large amounts, garlic may stimulate uterine contractions and secretions (Farnsworth et al 1975).
    • Do not use garlic while nursing.

    Side effects: At the recommended doses, there are no known adverse effects of garlic use. Rarely, and only after frequent contact with the plant, an inflammatory condition of the skin (eczema) or other allergic reactions may develop.

    Drug interactions: There are no known interactions of garlic with any drugs.

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    Garlic may be useful in treating fungus infections. In several studies, even in small quantities, the garlic compounds ajoene, diallyl trisulfide -- a garlic extract containing allicin -- and a number of other sulfuric garlic compounds inhibited fungi by interfering with fungus metabolism.

    With a cream containing 0.4% ajoene from garlic, one study was able to cure 100% of patients with athlete's foot over the course of two weeks.

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    Numerous studies have shown that garlic has a beneficial influence on cholesterol.

    In a 12-week, randomized, controlled trial in men with moderately high cholesterol levels, 900 milligrams of garlic per day reduced total cholesterol levels by 12%, significantly improved their ratio of high-density cholesterol (HDL, the good cholesterol) to total cholesterol levels, and reduced blood pressure.

    A double-blind, cross-over study found significant decreases in cholesterol levels and blood pressure in men with moderately elevated cholesterol levels who were taking 7.2 grams of aged garlic extract per day over six months.

    In a large-scale, randomized, controlled trial in patients with elevated cholesterol or blood fats, taking 800 milligrams of standardized garlic powder per day resulted, on average, in a 12% drop in cholesterol and a 17% drop in levels of certain blood fats known as triglycerides.

    Another study found that 600 milligrams per day of garlic powder protected low-density cholesterol (LDL, the bad cholesterol) against oxidation; oxidized LDL is damaging to the arterial walls.

    In people with a tendency toward excessive blood clotting, taking 800 mg of powdered garlic in a form that passes the stomach intact (enteric-coated tablets) reduced unwanted clotting.

    A quantitative review of 28 clinical studies on the effect of garlic preparations found evidence to suggest that garlic reduces total serum cholesterol. One-half to one clove of garlic per day or the equivalent supplement lowered cholesterol levels by a conservative average of 9%.

    A review of a similar set of studies concluded that a daily dose of 600 to 900 milligrams of garlic powder would, on average, reduce serum cholesterol levels by about 10% and triglyceride levels by about 14%.

    A quantitative summary study (meta-analysis) of 16 previous studies found an average 12% reduction of serum cholesterol among participants who all took the same dried garlic powder preparation. Although another study does not support this conclusion, the totality of evidence appears to favor a beneficial effect of garlic preparations on cholesterol levels.

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    Garlic helps keep arteries healthy. In one observational study, people taking more than 300 milligrams per day of standardized garlic powder for two or more years showed less age-related damage to the wall of the aorta, the main trunk artery, than control participants. The aortas of 70-year-old participants who took garlic were as elastic as the aortas of 55-year-old participants who did not take garlic. This finding may help explain results that garlic reduces blood pressure.

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    The following cautions should be considered before using ginger: Situations in which use of ginger is not advised:
    • Do not use ginger supplements if you have gallstones.
    • Because the safety of using ginger supplements during pregnancy has not been established, do not use ginger supplements if you are pregnant. 

    Side effects:
    There are no known side effects of ginger supplements.

    Drug interactions:
    Do not use ginger supplements with Coumadin or other blood-thinning drugs except under medical supervision. Ginger has a mild, but dose-dependent, blood-thinning effect.

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    Garlic

    While garlic has been believed to treat the common cold, the research is less than robust. 

    In a study of over 145 individuals, those who took garlic daily for three months suffered with a cold the same length of time as those taking a placebo.  However, if you want to add it to chicken soup for a little flavor, it certainly won't hurt.

    Garlic
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    Multiple studies in humans have reported small reductions in total blood cholesterol and low-density lipoproteins ("bad cholesterol") over short periods of time (4 to 12 weeks). Effects on high-density lipoproteins ("good cholesterol") are unclear. This remains an area of controversy.

    You should read product labels, and discuss all therapies with a qualified healthcare provider. Natural Standard information does not constitute medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment.



    For more information visit https://naturalmedicines.therapeuticresearch.com/
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    Garlic is a culinary herb that is widely used for the treatment and prevention of cardiovascular disease and cancer. Numerous controlled trials have examined the effects of oral garlic on serum lipids. Long-term effects on lipids or cardiovascular morbidity and mortality remain unknown. Other preparations (such as enteric-coated or raw garlic) have not been well studied.

    Small reductions in blood pressure (<10 millimeters of mercury), inhibition of platelet aggregation, and enhancement of fibrinolytic activity have been reported, and may exert effects on cardiovascular outcomes, although evidence is preliminary in these areas.

    Numerous case-control/population-based studies suggest that regular consumption of garlic (particularly unprocessed garlic) may reduce the risk of developing several types of cancer, including gastric and colorectal malignancies. However, prospective controlled trials are lacking.

    Multiple cases of bleeding have been associated with garlic use, and caution is warranted in patients at risk of bleeding or prior to some surgical/dental procedures. Garlic does not appear to significantly affect blood glucose levels.

    You should read product labels, and discuss all therapies with a qualified healthcare provider. Natural Standard information does not constitute medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment.



    For more information visit https://naturalmedicines.therapeuticresearch.com/
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    Garlic may increase the risk of bleeding. In theory, this risk may be further increased when garlic is taken with other herbs or supplements that also increase the risk of bleeding. Multiple cases of bleeding have been reported with the use of Ginkgo biloba and two cases with saw palmetto. Numerous other agents may theoretically increase the risk of bleeding, although this has not been proven in most cases.

    Vitamin E may have positive effects on cardiovascular disease and atherosclerosis. Taking garlic with vitamin E may increase these effects.

    Garlic may have a small effect in lowering blood pressure. Caution should be used if taken with other supplements that can lower blood pressure.

    Garlic may lower blood sugar levels. Caution is advised when using herbs or supplements that may also lower blood sugar. Blood glucose levels may require monitoring, and doses may need adjustment.

    Garlic may lower cholesterol a small amount. These effects may be larger than expected if taken with other cholesterol-lowering supplements such as fish oil. Individuals with thyroid disorders or who take thyroid medications should use caution in taking garlic supplements as they may affect the thyroid.

    Garlic may interact with herbals and dietary supplements that are metabolized by the liver's CYP450 enzyme system.

    Garlic and Pycnogenol® have been shown to increase human growth hormone secretion in laboratory experiments.

    Garlic may alter levels of various herbs with anti-cancer properties. Check with your oncologist and pharmacist before starting to take garlic supplements.

    Garlic may increase the effects of anthelmintics, antibacterials, antifungals, intraocular pressure-altering herbs, anti-obesity herbs and supplements, antioxidants, herbs and supplements used for osteoporosis, phytoestrogens, fish oil, neurologic herbs and supplements, performance-enhancing herbs and supplements, potassium, selenium, vasodilators, or zinc.

    Garlic may decrease the effectiveness of fertility agents or herbs and supplements used to suppress the immune system.

    You should read product labels, and discuss all therapies with a qualified healthcare provider. Natural Standard information does not constitute medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment.



    For more information visit https://naturalmedicines.therapeuticresearch.com/
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    Garlic is likely safe during pregnancy in amounts usually eaten in food, based on historical use. However, garlic supplements or large amounts of garlic should be avoided during pregnancy due to a possible increased risk of bleeding. In addition, early animal studies suggest that garlic may cause contraction of the uterus. Many tinctures contain high levels of alcohol, and should be avoided during pregnancy.

    Garlic is likely safe during breastfeeding in amounts usually eaten in food, based on historical use. However, some mothers who take garlic supplements report increased nursing time, milk odor, and reduced feeding by the infant. The safety of garlic supplements during breastfeeding is not known.

    You should read product labels, and discuss all therapies with a qualified healthcare provider. Natural Standard information does not constitute medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment.