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Why do skin tags happen?

Skin tags can occur at any age on anybody and they generally are not related to hygiene or medications. However they are more common in late adulthood which may explain why you are experiencing them now. A dermatologist should be consulted for removal of skin tabs.
Dr. Ellen Marmur, MD
Dermatology

Like so many other skin conditions, skin tags are genetic. They happen in places of wear and tear and show up where skin (or items such as clothing or jewelry) rubs against skin, for instance on the neck or underarms. For this reason, obesity can make them worse. Skin tags tend to increase during pregnancy, when everything in the body grows at an accelerated rate. Sometimes pregnancy skin tags go away by themselves about six months after a woman gives birth. Most of the time, however, skin tags have to be removed by a doctor.

Simple Skin Beauty: Every Woman's Guide to a Lifetime of Healthy, Gorgeous Skin

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Simple Skin Beauty: Every Woman's Guide to a Lifetime of Healthy, Gorgeous Skin

What if a leading dermatologist just happened to be your best friend and you could ask her anything? DR. ELLEN MARMUR, a world-renowned New York City dermatologist, answers all your questions with...

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Important: This content reflects information from various individuals and organizations and may offer alternative or opposing points of view. It should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. As always, you should consult with your healthcare provider about your specific health needs.