Food Allergies & Food Intolerance

Food Allergies & Food Intolerance

Food Allergies & Food Intolerance
Food allergies occur when the body attacks a food it mistakes as harmful, causing symptoms such as nausea, stomach pain, diarrhea, shortness of breath or hives. With food intolerance, the digestive system alone rejects the food, finding it difficult to digest properly. Foods such as peanuts, shellfish, eggs, soy or wheat are the most common type of food allergens.

Recently Answered

  • 1 Answer
    A

    Fructose intolerance limits your body's ability to use sugar to create energy. As a result, you can suffer from low blood sugar and experience feelings of irritability and sweating. You may also have vomiting or diarrhea. Without treatment, people with fructose intolerance can risk liver damage, coma, and death.

  • 1 Answer
    A

    Wheat allergies cause the body to react negatively toward wheat protein. When an individual eats wheat products the immune system creates antibodies that attack those wheat proteins. Those antibodies cause an allergic reaction in the body that can range from slight to severe. The symptoms of an allergic reaction can affect the mouth, throat, digestive system, and eyes, causing rashes, irritation, and swelling.

  • 1 Answer
    A

    Your doctor may start by asking you questions about your soy allergy reactions to determine whether or not you're allergic. The doctor will also likely perform one or two allergy tests. In a skin test, the doctor applies some soy to your skin and then watches to determine whether or not you develop a rash. A blood test measures levels of certain antibodies in your blood. Based on the test results, the doctor will determine the right treatment for your condition.

  • 2 Answers
    A
    A Pediatrics, answered on behalf of

    Most peanut allergies are first suspected after a person eats peanuts and has an allergic reaction. After treating the immediate symptoms, your doctor may draw blood and look for blood evidence of a peanut allergy. If the blood test is negative, you should see an allergist to find out what caused your reaction.

    If you just happen to do a blood test for food allergies and see a peanut allergy without having symptoms previously, more testing needs to done. Your doctor will likely send you to an allergist for a skin prick test. The skin prick test gives the best information. 

    See All 2 Answers
  • 1 Answer
    A
    There are a variety of tests and procedures a doctor can use to diagnose wheat allergies. Doctors may have you make a food diary detailing what you eat and how you react to it, or they may do a skin test to see how you react to various allergens. Sometimes doctors at a hospital will watch and monitor you while you try various foods and see how your body reacts. Your doctor may also just ask you to stop eating foods that seem to be giving you trouble and see if that solves the problem, or do a blood test to look for the proper antibodies.
  • 1 Answer
    A
    Be sure to discuss a variety of topics with your doctor, including symptoms, family history of allergies and any medications you are taking. Your doctor may ask if certain foods seem to trigger symptoms, how much was eaten, and how quickly after a meal those symptoms appear. Since appointments are often short, write down any questions you may have for the doctor so that you can leave with all the information you need. Do not hesitate to ask questions of the doctor, particularly if you are confused or do not understand something. Be aware that your doctor may recommend more testing, including blood tests or skin-prick allergen tests.
  • 1 Answer
    A

    If you have a peanut allergy, your immune system has identified peanut protein as a threat to the body. This means that when you come into contact with peanuts, your immune system produces an antibody that clings to white blood cells. Those antibodies then release certain chemicals, such as histamine, that cause inflammation of tissue and lead to allergy symptoms. In most allergic reactions to peanuts, these symptoms may include an itchy throat, hives, indigestion, difficulty breathing, and runny nose. In severe, sometimes life-threatening cases, peanut allergy can trigger an anaphylactic reaction where heart rate speeds up, blood pressure falls, and the airway constricts.

  • 2 Answers
    A

    Anaphylaxis is a severe allergic reaction that can potentially become life-threatening. Anaphylactic reactions can be caused by foods, medications, insect stings, and latex, but the most common cause is peanuts. The symptoms of anaphylaxis can begin minutes after someone comes into contact with the peanuts. These symptoms may include difficulty breathing, a sudden blood pressure drop, and weak or rapid heartbeat. For people who have severe peanut allergies, doctors usually prescribe an epinephrine auto-injector that should be carried at all times. Epinephrine will reopen airways and retighten blood vessels to increase blood pressure.

    See All 2 Answers
  • 1 Answer
    A

    Your doctor may want to perform a non-invasive breath test to diagnose fructose malabsorption, but it does not identify fructose intolerance effectively. Nor can a breath test identify the kind of fructose intolerance that is inherited. To identify hereditary fructose intolerance, your doctor will perform a liver biopsy, a fructose tolerance test, or a DNA test.

  • 2 Answers
    A
    A , Family Medicine, answered
    How is fructose intolerance diagnosed?
    Though there is a test, an elimination diet is the best way to diagnose fructose intolerance. In this video, integrative medicine expert Aviva Romm, MD, discusses which main culprits to eliminate, and the fructose-heavy foods to be most aware of.
    See All 2 Answers