Food Allergies & Food Intolerance

Food Allergies & Food Intolerance

Food Allergies & Food Intolerance
Food allergies occur when the body attacks a food it mistakes as harmful, causing symptoms such as nausea, stomach pain, diarrhea, shortness of breath or hives. With food intolerance, the digestive system alone rejects the food, finding it difficult to digest properly. Foods such as peanuts, shellfish, eggs, soy or wheat are the most common type of food allergens.

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    A Nutrition & Dietetics, answered on behalf of
    Food intolerances are incredibly common. Lactose is a big one. Up to 50% of the U.S. population has some issue or malabsorption when it comes to dairy products. Mainly, it's the sugar source, or lactose, in dairy products that tends to cause most of the problem. Doctors have a breath test that people can take to help determine if they have lactose malabsorption.

    When it comes to actual food allergies, there are eight leading food allergens that affect about 8% of the U.S. population. These include wheat, dairy products, eggs and soy. If you are having symptoms, it is worthwhile to consider getting tested for some of these allergens or working with a registered dietitian. A dietitian can help you do an elimination diet to see if you feel better when you remove some of these foods from your diet.
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    Whether at a church function, a neighborhood gathering or in your own home, it’s always a good idea to label dishes that contain nuts so people can make informed choices as they select what they’ll eat. Some people are so allergic that they shouldn’t even eat a dish that was prepared using the same mixing bowl as another dish that contains nuts. They may also be so allergic that they can’t use a serving spoon from a dish with nuts. People who are this allergic usually know and they have their ways to protect themselves, but they’ll appreciate the labels.

    This content originally appeared on StoneCrest Family Physicians Blog.
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    A , Family Medicine, answered
    What are some hidden sources of gluten?
    Some hidden sources of gluten include soups, dressings, marinades, sauces, and even beverages and cosmetics. In this video, I will share some surprising and sneaky sources of gluten to be aware of.
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    A Family Medicine, answered on behalf of
    Food allergies in children are on the rise, and parents need to be vigilant. Food allergies affect an estimated 5% of the children in the United States. Further, children with food allergies are two to four times more likely to have asthma or other allergic conditions than those without food allergies.
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    Current recommendations on giving peanuts to children endorsed by the American Academy of Pediatrics are as follows:
    1. If an infant has severe eczema or other noted allergies, start peanut exposure as early as 4 to 6 months of age, if the infant is ready for solids.
    2. If an infant has mild to moderate eczema, introduce peanut around 6 months of age, if ready for solids.
    3. For a healthy infant with no allergies, introduce peanut around the same time as other solids.
    All these recommendations carry the same advise that an infant must be ready for solids. Parents should ask a healthcare provider if they are unsure if their infant is ready for solids.
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    A , Nursing, answered
    Gluten intolerance typically presents with gastrointestinal symptoms like stomach upset, diarrhea, etc., but there have been many patients who have complained of a persistent cough. The cough diminishes when they pay attention to what they eat and they lower their intake of gluten.
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    A , Pediatrics, answered
    Peanut allergy
    A peanut allergy is the food allergy most likely to be life-threatening, but is it lifelong? In this video, Dr. Oz guest Dr. Tanya Altmann reveals whether peanut allergies last for a lifetime or eventually go away.
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    A , Naturopathic Medicine, answered
    A study in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology conducted at Mount Sinai in New York looked at 503 infants. According to blood tests, it was found that the babies whose mothers ate a greater number of peanut products during pregnancy were more likely to test positive for peanut allergies showing as allergic factors found in the blood. Of note, it is not clear whether these children will definitely develop allergy. Most of the children had not actually ingested peanuts at the time of the blood test.

    What is particularly interesting in this study is that all had likely milk or egg allergies or significant eczema, which are risk factors for peanut allergy.
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    A , Naturopathic Medicine, answered
    From a naturopathic standpoint, many young patients have cow's milk, egg and even gluten allergies -- all of which can increase inflammatory cells in the body, thus causing increased susceptibility to an exaggerated reaction to peanut. In my experience, removing offending foods like cow's milk and gluten can often lower the child's reactiveness to other foods like peanuts.
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    What are IgE-mediated food allergies?
    IgE-mediated food allergies are one of the main types of food allergies. In this video, Jessica Savage, MD, Clinical & Laboratory Immunologist at Brigham and Women's hospital describes how this allergy can increase your risk for anaphylaxis.