Flaxseed Oil

Flaxseed Oil

Flaxseed Oil
Flaxseed oil is a treatment for gastrointestinal conditions. In addition, it provides dietary fiber and promotes heart health. Flaxseed is a good alternative to those who do not like fish and want to get the benefits of the omega-3 fatty acids found in fish oil.

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  • 1 Answer
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    A , Pharmacy, answered
    On the label, flaxseed oil supplements may contain the Latin name of the flax plant, Linum usitatissimum, as well as several other possible names. These include alpha-linolenic acid, alasi, brown flaxseed oil, common flax oil, golden flax oil, kattan, keten, lin, lin commun, huile de lin, Linum crepitans, ta ma, tisii, saatlein, malsag, omega-3 fatty acid, and other names.

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    A , Pharmacy, answered
    Foods are not known to interact with flaxseed oil supplements, but several medications may. Flaxseed oil can increase the effect of drugs that slow blood clotting, including ibuprofen, aspirin, naproxen, warfarin, dalteparin, clopidogrel, diclofenac, heparin and enoxaparin. It can also increase the effect of medications that lower blood pressure. Talk to your doctor before taking flaxseed oil, and always be sure your doctor is aware of all supplements and medicines that you take.
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    A , Pharmacy, answered
    As with any nutritional supplement, it is a good idea to tell your doctor you are taking flaxseed oil. Your doctor can tell you about possible drug interactions and flaxseed oil risks that might likely affect you, given the other medications you take and your health profile. Your doctor can also recommend other ways to treat or prevent your medical condition if flaxseed oil is not right for you.
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    A , Pharmacy, answered
    Flaxseed oil supplements are made from the seeds of the flax plant and are available as capsules or in liquid form. Flaxseed oil contains alpha-linolenic acid (ALA), an omega-3 fatty acid that is thought to reduce inflammation in the body. Studies suggest ALA may help reduce swelling of joints in arthritis and reduce the risk of dying from heart disease.

    Other preliminary research indicates that flaxseed oil might help treat attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, dry eyes and high blood pressure, and help prevent the spread and growth of breast and prostate cancers. More research is needed to confirm the benefits of flaxseed oil for any of these conditions.

    Talk to your doctor for more information about flaxseed oil supplements.
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    People with bowel disorders should avoid flax seed in crushed or powdered form because it acts as a laxative; they can try the oil if they are interested in this supplement. Because flax seed reduces swelling, it can slow the formation of blood clots and increase bleeding, so people taking blood-thinning medications such as aspirin or herbal remedies like ginko biloba should consult a doctor before trying flax seed. Flax seed also can mimic the effects of estrogen, so women with health problems related to a hormonal imbalance, such as endometriosis, should be cautious. It is not recommended for pregnant or breastfeeding women.

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    Many vegetarians and others who do not eat fish get their omega-3 fatty acids from flax seeds. In addition to omega-3s, flax seeds contain fiber, vitamin E and calcium among other vitamins and minerals. Flax seeds are also low in saturated fat.

    Unfortunately, the omega-3 of flax seeds is located in the seed and unless you chew the seeds thoroughly, they can be difficult to digest. To get the benefit of flax seeds, grind them in a blender, coffee grinder or food processor. Then, add to dough and batter, sprinkle on cereal or pudding or add to a smoothie.
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    A , Pharmacy, answered
    Because flaxseed oil can reduce your blood's clotting ability, other prescription, over-the-counter, and herbal drugs that accomplish the same goal may amplify this effect and cause increased danger of excessive bleeding. These include antiplatelets (aspirin, clopidogrel and ticlopidine), anticoagulants (heparin and warfarin), ibuprofen, naproxen, danshen, devil's claw, eleuthero, garlic, ginger (in large amounts), ginkgo, horse chestnut, panax ginseng, papain, red clover, and saw palmetto. Antihypertensives, or drugs to treat high blood pressure, may interact with flaxseed oil and cause an unsafe drop in blood pressure. Other medicines may not work as well if taken with flaxseed oil, so it is best to avoid taking other medicines less than 1 hour before or 2 hours after taking flaxseed oil.
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    A , Pharmacy, answered
    The recommended daily dosage of flaxseed oil varies based on age and health. Ask your doctor what dose is best for you. Do not take more than 3 tablespoons of flaxseed oil per day unless directed by your doctor.
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    A Nutrition & Dietetics, answered on behalf of
    Omega-3 fatty acids can help lower your risk of heart disease and stroke, as well as reduce the risk for a heart attack in people with diabetes.

    One of the types of Omega 3s is alpha-linolenic acid (ALA). ALA is produced by leafy green vegetables and can be converted into EPA and DHA by the body. A rich source of ALA is flaxseed, flaxseed oil, canola oil, walnuts, and walnut oil. Flaxseed contains three beneficial elements which include Omega-3 fatty acids, fiber, and phytochemical lignans (plant chemicals that are helpful in the prevention of chronic diseases). Flaxseed is a great option for those who do not like fish, or are looking for alternative food choices to lower their risk for heart disease.

  • 2 Answers
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    A , Pharmacy, answered
    Side effects of flaxseed oil include: bloating, diarrhea, gas, nausea, stomach pain, and anal leakage. Your doctor can suggest ways to alleviate these symptoms. Call your doctor right away if you experience muscle weakness or changes in heart rhythm. These may be due to a drop in potassium levels caused by flaxseed oil; lowering your dose may help. Call 911 for emergency medical help if you experience symptoms of an allergic reaction, including: difficulty breathing; tightness in your chest; itching; rash; hives; or swelling of your mouth, face, lips, or tongue.
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