The Five Senses

The Five Senses

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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered

    Massaging and caressing our skin stimulates the vagus nerve, which runs up the spine to the brain and helps regulate multiple body functions. Being touched in a loving way reduces levels of the stress chemical cortisol and increases levels of the feel-good chemical oxytocin.

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    Combining a visuospatial skill (ability to recognize and organize information when you see something and then interpret what you see) with movement is called a visual motor skill. Examples of visual motor skills include writing, typing, copying designs with pencil and paper, putting puzzles together, and cutting with scissors.
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    A Nutrition & Dietetics, answered on behalf of
    Visuospatial skills are the abilities to recognize and organize information when you see something and then interpret what you see. Examples of this skill include reading, recognizing shapes, finding objects in a picture, and following a map.
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    A , Internal Medicine, answered
    Dr. Robin Miller - Why are men more visual than women?
    Men are visual creatures and respond to what they see more strongly than women. In this video, Dr. Robin Miller reveals what this visuality stems from.

     
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    A , Ear, Nose & Throat (Otolaryngology), answered
    Sound is a vibration of molecules that moves in the form of waves. Sound waves travel quickly, at about 770 miles per hour in air. There are two measurable qualities that influence how we perceive sound. One is frequency (pitch). The other is intensity (loudness).

    Frequency is the number of cycles a sound wave makes in one second. The number of cycles is measured in hertz (Hz). The higher the frequency of a sound, the higher the pitch. High-pitched sounds, such as a siren, have frequencies of thousands of hertz. Low-pitched sounds, such as thunder, have frequencies of only a few hertz.

    People with normal hearing can hear frequencies as low as 20 and as high as 20,000 hertz. However, humans are most sensitive to sounds in the frequency range characteristic of human speech, 500 to 8,000 hertz.
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    A , Ear, Nose & Throat (Otolaryngology), answered
    Frequency is the number of cycles a sound wave makes in one second. The number of cycles is measured in hertz (Hz). The higher the frequency of a sound, the higher the pitch. High-pitched sounds, such as a siren, have frequencies of thousands of hertz. Low-pitched sounds, such as thunder, have frequencies of only a few hertz.

    People with normal hearing can hear frequencies as low as 20 and as high as 20,000 hertz. However, humans are most sensitive to sounds in the frequency range characteristic of human speech, 500 to 8,000 hertz.
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    A , Ear, Nose & Throat (Otolaryngology), answered
    A sound's intensity is measured in decibel (dB) levels. Decibels are not precise units of measurement, like feet or yards, but rather a scale of progression. Every increase of 10 dB is significant -- it's not an additional 10 units but rather 10 times the original decibel level. The softest sound that an adult with normal hearing can hear is 0 dB, and the loudest sound, the sound of a rocket taking off, is more than 180 dB.
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    A , Ear, Nose & Throat (Otolaryngology), answered
    Your brain does more than tell you what you just heard -- which musical note it was, or which word, and so on. It sorts out the sounds by their relative importance. It helps tune out unimportant sounds, such as the flush of a toilet, the hum of the refrigerator, or the din in a restaurant, so that important sounds, like human voices, come through clearly. It's not that you don't hear unimportant sounds; rather, your brain makes sure you don't notice them as much as more important sounds.
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    The American Speech-Language-Hearing Association defines deficits in central auditory processing (CAP) as "difficulties in the perceptual processing of auditory information in the central nervous system (CNS)," which are demonstrated by poor performance in one or more of the following skills:

    1) Understanding auditory information in the presence of competing acoustic signals (e.g., speech in a noisy environment);

    2) Processing of time-related cues in auditory signals;

    3) Recognizing patterns in sounds;

    4) Distinguishing the differences between two sounds;

    5) Understanding degraded acoustic signals; and

    6) Locating the source of a sound.
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    To correct your anosmia, talk to your doctor. He or she can find the underlying cause of your anosmia. Often, the inability to smell is caused by a condition that can be corrected, such as allergies, smoking, or an obstruction in the nose.