Fitness

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    The formula for men is 220 minus age. For example, for men age 50, this gives a maximum heartbeat of 170.
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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered
    teens to exercise
    Regular exercise is healthy for anyone. In this video, Dr. Oz reveals his tried and true advice for getting a teen into the exercise game.


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    Physical activity is important for adolescents for many reasons. Physical activity decreases their risk of developing childhood obesity, which in turn dramatically reduces their risks of developing diabetes and heart disease later in life. Regular physical activity in children has been shown to improve test scores and academic achievement, promote stronger bones and muscles, improved motor skill development and improves social skills. Physically active children have also been shown to have higher test scores and are more likely to graduate high school as well as attend college.

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    Teens tend to have short attention spans, so using simple choreography or teaching them basic workout moves is the best approach. Teens grow at different rates so it’s important to make sure they “fit into” various workout machines, by teaching them to make adjustments that fit their frame size. Using exercise to help teens accomplish specific goals is key to keeping teens engaged with exercise. The goals can vary and can include weight loss, more flexibility, faster speeds for certain sports, improvements in strength for daily living. Teens seem to prefer positive reinforcement, so applauding small fitness achievements can go a long way to inspiring them to stick with a challenging exercise program. Teens also benefit from a mentoring relationship, and personal stories that highlight hardship and ultimate success can be inspiring. If you’re a mentor who lost weight or overcame a disability with exercise, sharing the journey can help to inspire a teen.
    Discovering a teen’s favorite class in school can help to make exercise more fun. If they like math, then explaining exercise formulas may resonate; if they excel in English or a writing class, then discussing specific exercise terms may help them to connect with the fitness program. If cooking classes are their passion, then discussing nutrition principles that help support their exercise (and weight) goals, may help keep them engaged with exercise.
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    Make it fun. Exercise is any activity that stresses the musculoskeletal system or the cardiorespiratory system. Exercise is not limited to weight training or running on a treadmill. Make exercise a game that your kids will enjoy. Ride bicycles, play catch or soccer in the local park. You can also, take your kid swimming as this is an excellent form of exercise. Getting your kid involved in after school or community sport leagues is another way to exercise.

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    A Sports Medicine, answered on behalf of
    Across the United States, more and more teenagers are focusing on a single, specialized sport or activity, much like the young gymnasts or other competitors at the Olympics. Unfortunately, these adolescents also increasingly develop so-called overuse injuries. An overuse injury occurs over time as the tissue of a bone or muscle endures repetitive stress -- and then is not allowed enough time to heal and recover.

    Research has shown a link between sport specialization and an increase in overuse injuries among young people, many of whom train vigorously at the high school level or earlier. In some cases, these teens are aiming for the professional or Olympic level of competition.

    Such a drive or ambition to become an elite athlete tends to leave out a crucial -- medical -- aspect of growing up: Bones and ligaments are not fully developed and are more vulnerable to injury. We have to make sure that we are providing a healthy environment with proper guidance for our children. The focus should not be just on winning. The health and safety of our young athletes should not be a secondary concern.
     
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    Kids ages 14 and up – as well as adults -- should:

    • Participate in 30 to 60 minutes each day of moderate physical activity such as walking. This can be broken into sessions of 10 minutes each. If activity is more intense, 30 minutes a day is acceptable. If activity is light, aim for 60 minutes.
    • Build muscle strength and endurance through resistance or strength-training exercises. Resistance may come from your child’s own body such as with sit-ups, push-ups, and pull-ups or from equipment such as weight machines, free weights or barbells, a body bar, resistance bands, stability ball, or water.
    • Build balance and flexibility through stretching and flexibility exercises. In addition to warm-up and cool-down periods before moderate and vigorous activities, yoga, tai chi, tae kwon do, qigong, Pilates, and basic stretching build flexibility and balance.
    • Build cardiovascular endurance through aerobic or cardio exercises and activities. Examples include any activity -- walking, bicycling, swimming, jogging/running, dancing, martial arts, stair climbing, skiing -- that requires sustained movement of the large muscles of your body, such as the thighs, butt, back, and chest, for at least 10 minutes.

    From Good Kids, Bad Habits: The RealAge Guide to Raising Healthy Children by Jennifer Trachtenberg.

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    Weight training is important for everyone over the age of 12 with physician consent. Interval training is a great way to incorporate weights and cardio in one workout. There are many different ways this workout can be designed and it can be done up to three or four times a week with great results in as little as three weeks. Some have even claimed to notice a difference after just one work out. Younger adults have a unique advantage to getting these habits started earlier and extremely reducing risk of a whole list of health problems people that don't exercise will experience as early as 30 years of age. 

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    Health 411: Daily Exercise
    Dr. Lydie Hazan recommends that teens get at least 30 minutes of enjoyable, outdoor exercise, five days a week. Watch this video from Discovery Health.


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    Helping a teen maintain a healthy weight involves a combination of healthy eating habits, physical activity habits as well as social supports and an environment that encourages health behavior. For help with proper eating habits you can consult a registered dietitian or a wellness coach. For help with fitness advice you can consult a wellness coach or personal trainer who can help create an effective fitness program for your teen. By providing your child with good information and a positive environment to encourage those behaviors will help your child maintain a healthy weight.
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