First Prenatal Check-Up

First Prenatal Check-Up

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    A , Midwifery Nursing, answered

    First prenatal visits are a time for learning. You will learn about yourself, your partner, your family history and about the health care provider and the practice you are choosing. During the first visit there will be a thorough health history and family history taken by the person you have scheduled your visit with. This is a time when they will learn if there are any potential medical or inherited problems you need to be screened for. During the visit the provider should orient you to the services they provide and what to expect in the coming months. Based on your individual history they should discuss nutrition/ exercise/ sexual activity and any other questions you might have during your visit. Before you leave from the first visit you should know how to contact them if you have questions and how they want to be contacted in case of emergency. You should ask them what hospital they use. Many couples chose to ask questions like what is their induction of labor policy as well as cesarean section rates. Many couples will ask who will be the one delivering them? Finding a provider that meets your needs for the pregnancy and the birth will require doing a little homework. Asking for referrals from nurses that work labor and delivery and childbirth educators and doulas are a good way to find a match that will work for you and your partner.

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    A OBGYN (Obstetrics & Gynecology), answered on behalf of
    We encourage the first prenatal visit between 7-9 weeks. But, it depends on your own history. If you have a history of miscarriages, you may be seen earlier. During the first prenatal visit, there will be an exam and lab work. Sometimes people will have an ultrasound done during this visit, but it isn’t guaranteed. During this visit, we usually give more information on where you’ll deliver and how the practice works.
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    A , Administration, answered

    Prenatal care consists of three interrelated elements: regular visits with your midwife or doctor, the care you give yourself, and the care you receive from friends, family, or other support people.

    A woman with a normally progressing pregnancy and no complications usually visits her health care provider every four to six weeks during weeks 4 to 28, every two to three weeks from weeks 28 to 36, and every one to two weeks in the last month before her due date. The style of care you receive and the quality of your interactions can affect not only your physical experience of birth but your emotional experience.

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    A
    A , Administration, answered

    Every visit until you give birth will include a routine check. This routine check will likely include checking in with you about any concerns you may have; checking your weight gain; listening to the baby's heartbeat (using Doppler if you so choose); assessing the baby's growth (fundal height) and vital signs, as well as her or his position; collecting a urine sample to screen for diabetes, preeclampsia (protein in urine), or infections; and conducting a physical exam, which includes taking your blood pressure to check for gestational hypertension and checking your hands and feet for swelling and your legs for varicose veins. If you have not yet done so, the second trimester is a good time to discuss your birth preferences with your provider.

    Some providers suggest that women conduct some of these physical assessments (such as weighing ourselves and checking urine) for ourselves. Many women appreciate the opportunity to participate in our own health care.

    One of the purposes of testing your urine is to determine whether you have preeclampsia, a syndrome whose symptoms include high blood pressure; generalized swelling of hands, feet, and face (edema); sudden weight gain; and protein in the urine. Preeclampsia has the potential to lead to serious problems during pregnancy.

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    A answered
    Your prenatal visits will now occur more often. Starting in your 28th to 32nd week, you will probably see your doctor every two weeks, and then once a week starting at about 36 weeks. In addition to what has been routinely checked, your doctor may do a pelvic exam at about 36-37 weeks to check the position of your baby and the condition of your cervix. There are a lot of changes in the last month of pregnancy and it is important that you are seen regularly. Your doctor will be checking for early labor and signs of blood pressure abnormalities. 

    You will also be tested for Group B Strep at this time. This is a normal vaginal bacteria carried by 25% of women. This can cause a serious infection in newborns. If you have a positive culture for this, we will give you antibiotics in labor which will dramatically decrease the baby’s risk of infection.

    You will want to schedule out until at least 41 weeks because many pregnancies go past the due date. This will allow for you and your doctor to formulate a plan if you go post dates.
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    A , Administration, answered

    Prenatal care is not only about visiting your health care provider. It is also about taking care of you. As a pregnant woman, it is easy to feel overwhelmed by the amount of advice and precautions you may hear. While it is wise to make healthy choices when you are able, it is important to maintain a sense of perspective.

    As a pregnant woman, it is easy to feel overwhelmed by the amount of advice and precautions you may hear. While it is wise to make healthy choices when you are able, it is important to maintain a sense of perspective.

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    A , Administration, answered
    Most health insurance plans, including Medicaid, will pay for prenatal visits, care, and medically necessary tests. If you are concerned that you cannot afford a prenatal test that you have decided is best for your pregnancy, your health care provider or a genetic counselor may be able to help you find some financial assistance to cover the cost of the test.
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    A
    A , Administration, answered

    If you have received a test result that indicates a disability, ask your health care provider to give you as much information as she or he has about what the results mean. You may be referred to a genetic counselor or social worker. These professionals can clarify and further explain any information you have received. They should provide additional information on abortion, adoption, and raising a child with the diagnosed condition. They should offer you information about what life with the condition is like, and they should make it possible for you to meet children and families living with the condition that has just been diagnosed, as well as families who decided not to continue pregnancies after learning about the condition in the pregnancy. If they don't offer such opportunities, ask them to help you learn where you can find them. If you are thinking about terminating the pregnancy, you may have only a few weeks to make your decision in some cases. Even so, try to make time to consider your decision.

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    A
    A , Administration, answered

    As you are deciding whether or not to have tests that will give you information about your developing baby, consider the following questions:

    • Do I want to know whether or not my baby might have a condition such as Down syndrome, sickle-cell anemia, cystic fibrosis, or deafness?
    • What do I know about life with these conditions?
    • Would knowing that my baby will have a particular condition make a difference in my decision to continue my pregnancy? If so, why?
    • Would knowing any other characteristics detectable by prenatal testing, such as the sex of my baby, the identity of the father, or whether I'm carrying twins or triplets, affect my decision about continuing my pregnancy? If so, why?

    As you consider testing, think about your own dreams of parenthood. What are the central values of your family, and how do futurechildren fit into your values and your life goals? How may a child's possible disease, disability, or health problem influence your parenting experience? How may a child's Down syndrome, cystic fibrosis, or other condition affect your life, your hopes for your child, your partner, your time with your other children?

    Before choosing to have any test, it is important to know what the test is capable of telling you and what the advantages and disadvantages are. Ask your health care provider, and do your own research, to find out the following:

    • What information is this test intended to provide?
    • Does the test pose any risk to you and/or your developing baby?
    • Why is this test recommended for you? Are you in a group that makes your baby more likely to have this condition?
    • When can you expect the results to come back?
    • How reliable is this test? If you get a result described as abnormal or unusual, what kind of follow-up testing or counseling will be offered?
    • Who can help you understand what your result means?
    • What are your options after receiving the result? Are there any treatments available for you or for the fetus if the result is abnormal,Or will the choice be between continuing or ending the pregnancy?
    • How much will this test cost? Will your health insurance cover part or all of the cost of this test? If not, can you get any financial assistance
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