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What are the common eye diseases?

Robert Abel Jr
Ophthalmology
Eye diseases common among adults range from temporary to chronic & sight‐threatening conditions. One of the most familiar eye diseases is pink eye, or conjunctivitis. Usually diagnosed in school‐age children because of its high level of contagion, pink eye is an inflammation of the conjunctiva, or the clear mucus membrane that covers the white part of the eye. Caused by virus, bacteria, or allergies, this condition should be treated by a physician even though it normally does not lead to serious complications.
As we age, more serious conditions can develop. Cataracts are one such problem; in fact, over half of adults 65 or older have some level of cataract development. Cataracts refer to a clouding over the lens of the eye caused by the clumping of proteins in the lens. Although there might be other factors that influence cataract development, diabetes can lead to a relatively early onset of the problem.
Other conditions are more difficult to identify and treat. Another common eye disease is glaucoma, or a set of conditions that result from damage to the optic nerve. Elevated pressure in the eye leads to damage to this nerve, and can result in unclear sight and a reduced field of vision.
Whether the result of an injury, surgery, or another eye condition, a third common eye problem is the detached retina. Although this condition is relatively rare, it is serious and can lead to loss of vision. The retina refers to the lining at the back of the eye; if this lining becomes torn, liquid can seep below it resulting in detachment.
Finally, the macula, or the center of the retina that provides detailed vision in one's direct line of sight, can deteriorate with age. Macular degeneration can result in a loss of central vision.
Integrative Health Solution: Wearing UV blocking sunglasses, taking a good multivitamin daily with a meal and having regular eye exams.

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Important: This content reflects information from various individuals and organizations and may offer alternative or opposing points of view. It should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. As always, you should consult with your healthcare provider about your specific health needs.