Healthy Eye and Vision

Healthy Eye and Vision

Healthy Habits For The Eyes & Vision

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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered

    Limit your intake of carbohydrates that are quickly digested and absorbed, such as white bread, corn chips, and other refined grains. Diets rich in these “high-glycemic” foods have been shown to increase a key risk factor for the development of macular degeneration.


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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered

    Get currants:  Black currants contain the compound anthocyanosides, which may be helpful for promoting night vision. Also called cassis, they can be found in jams, jellies, scones, and pies.

    Be green:  Two other nutrients that show promise in improving eye health are lutein and zeaxanthin. They sound exotic but are easy to find.

        •Good lutein sources: spinach, peas, and green bell peppers

        •Good sources of zeaxanthin: corn, spinach, orange bell peppers, and tangerines

     

     

     

     


    This content originally appeared on doctoroz.com
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    A , Ophthalmology, answered
    Although using a computer will not harm your eyes, staring at a computer screen all day will contribute to eyestrain or tired eyes. Adjust lighting so that it does not create a glare or harsh reflection on the screen. Also, when you're working on a computer or doing other close work such as reading or sewing, it's a good idea to rest your eyes briefly every hour or so to lessen eye fatigue. Finally, people who stare at a computer screen for long periods tend not to blink as often as usual, which can cause the eyes to feel dry and uncomfortable. Make a conscious effort to blink regularly so that the eyes stay well lubricated.
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    You may be seeing bright wavy lines while using your computer due to floaters in your eyes. Floaters are tiny bits of debris that float around in the eye and are usually harmless. It is more common to see floaters when you are staring at something bright and light colored, like a computer screen (especially if the screen has a white background), if you are looking at a white wall in a brightly lit room, or if you go outside at noon and stare off into a cloudless sky. 
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    A , Internal Medicine, answered

    We all know you're supposed to turn lights off when you're not using them. But you can also help by using compact fluorescent light bulbs. A 23-watt compact fluorescent will give you as much light as a 100-watt incandescent - and last ten times longer and use a quarter of the energy. The downside: They contain about 5 milligrams of mercury, so they need to be recycled properly. Check with your municipality for drop-offs for items containing mercury. (Different states have different regs; you can get more info on your state's recycling laws by checking www.lamprecycle.org.)

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    Children can focus at close distance without eyestrain better than adults. They often develop the habit of holding reading materials close to their eyes or sitting right in front of the television.

    There is no evidence that this damages their eyes, and the habit usually diminishes as children grow older. However, children with nearsightedness (myopia) sometimes sit very close to the television in order to see the images more clearly, so they should have an eye examination.

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    Working on computers or video display terminals (VDTs) will not permanently harm your eyes. However, when using a VDT for long periods of time, just as reading or doing other close work, you blink less than you normally would. This reduced rate of blinking makes your eyes dry, which may lead to the feeling of eyestrain or fatigue. It's worth reminding yourself to look away from the computer every 20 minutes or so to give your eyes a break. The target should be more than 10 feet away, and your break should last at least 20 seconds.

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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered
    Set your computer lower on the table or use a portable computer so your eyes look down when you work. That way, the opening between the eyelids stays small, which reduces the risk of developing dry eyes.

    You can also help relieve some irritation by changing your flicker rate on your computer to 70 or above.
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    A answered
    How you know if you have computer vision syndrome (CVS)? See if you experience the following symptoms:
    • dry eyes
    • neck and shoulder pain
    • blurry vision
    • headaches
    • eyestrain
    CVS comes from prolonged use of any digital technology, like computers, tablets, e-readers and cell phones. It occurs because your eyes have to work harder when you look at a screen, which is so very different than looking at a printed page. It won't cause permanent eye damage, but your eyes will feel damaged -- dry and tired.

    This content originally appeared on HealthyWomen.org.
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    A answered
    Cutting your screen time is the primary way to prevent computer vision syndrome (CVS). But if you must have your eyes on the screen, the following will also help:
    • Look away: Rest your eyes if you're using the computer for extended periods. After two hours, take a 15-minute break. And, for every 20 minutes of use, look away for 20 seconds at something 20 feet away (the 20-20-20 rule); this will allow time for your eyes to refocus.
    • Blink: We normally blink about 15 times a minute, but when we're at a screen, we blink much less. Staring at a computer can result in dry eyes, which can be painful and irritating. To keep the front surface of your eye moist, blink frequently. It's also wise to keep some lubricating drops handy. (Another way to avoid dry eye is to steer clear of air that blows directly in your face and by running a humidifier if the air in the room is dry.)
    • Sit properly: Besides sitting on a comfortable, padded chair that conforms well to your body and sitting with your feet flat on the floor, the American Optometric Association suggests that you sit about 25 inches from the screen (or about arm's length). The screen should be positioned so that you are looking in a slightly downward position.
    • Cut the glare: Since many screens are glass, they give off considerable glare. You can reduce it by using a matte screen filter.
    • Adjust the brightness: The screen should not be brighter than the surrounding light; if it is, your eyes will have to work even harder to see. To reduce eyestrain, try adjusting the lighting in your room and at the same time, increasing the contrast on your screen.
    This content originally appeared on HealthyWomen.org.