Everyday Activities & Fitness

Everyday Activities & Fitness

Everyday Activities & Fitness
Can performing everyday activities keep you physically fit? You would be surprised at how many calories you burn by doing housekeeping chores, shopping or chasing after children. There are many fitness tricks you can learn by increasing your activity at work, home or vacationing. Burn calories, tone muscles and lose weight in your everyday life.

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    A , Geriatric Medicine, answered
    Sitting at a desk all day and staring into the screen can zap you of your energy and drain your mood. To get out of your rut, all you have to do is get back on your feet! Yes, it is as simple as taking a few moments to stand tall, stretch your arms, and wiggle your toes and fingers. A boost in circulation will deliver much needed oxygen-rich blood to your cells. You will feel an instant surge in your mood and energy level. Smile while you stand! A smile will trigger the release of serotonin, the feel-good brain chemical that will instantly perk up your mood.
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    The difference between daily activities and structured exercise is the fact that a specific plan is put into place when a fitness program is structured. One of the best examples is the fact when I as a fitness professional put together a fitness program for a client each and every week I monitor and record what levels on intensity one is at in cardio training, and resistance training etc, and based on the body’s specific response to each adjustment I make is recorded and this tells me if the body is getting stronger through the cardio system and if the overall strength of and individual is increasing. In a structured program adjustments are constantly being made to challenge the body to new levels. Daily activities are wonderful in the fact that they help burn calories but most are not intense enough to challenge the body to be the best method when overcoming, and achieving fitness goals.    

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    Some fun and healthy summert activities include swimming at local ppols, lakes and the ocean, goign for hikes in the local hills, and participating in recreational leagues for sports like softball, ultimate frisbee or soccer leagues. Just stay well hydrated, avoid mid day summer heat, and wear clothing and sunscreen that protects you from the sun.
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    A , Fitness, answered

    Anyone can stretch, and it's easy to work stretching into your daily routine. Spend five minutes or so in the morning doing a few light stretches. Then stretch now and then throughout the day to relieve tension or if you've been sitting or standing in one position for long periods. Before going for a walk or a jog or whatever, spend 5 to 10 minutes stretching all of the body's major muscle groups. This will help you warm up and reduce the risk of injuring cold, stiff muscles. During the cool-down after you've finished, use light stretching to help prevent postexercise soreness and keep the muscles supple and ready for the next day.

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    Adding regular physical activity is even more important if you have a disability, since people with disabilities tend to lead less active lifestyles. Regular physical activity can help you develop a stronger heart and stronger lungs and muscles -- and can improve your mental health and ability to do everyday tasks.
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    A , Fitness, answered

    STAGE ONE:  GET MOVING

    Every day, you should be on your feet for at least one hour moving around, using the large muscles of the legs while walking, climbing stairs, working in the garden, shuttling about the kitchen, purposefully strolling about on your lunch hour, or just about anything but sitting quietly in front of a TV. This need not be continuous activity, nor do you need to work up a sweat. What’s important is that you are up on your feet moving about every day and, through the course of a day, accumulate at least 60 minutes of activity.

     

    STAGE TWO:  BREAK A SWEAT

    Once you’ve become accustomed to being up and “puttering about” at least an hour a day, you should gradually begin to add moderate activities to your weekly routine that eventually total at least 30 additional minutes, three times a week. Unlike Stage One activities, Stage Two activities typically are deliberate and planned. These what we often think of as recreational activities such as brisk walking, jogging, cycling, swimming, aerobic dance, or court sports. These activities should be sustained for 30 minutes or longer, they should be continuous, and they should be done at an intensity that brings a bit of sweat to your brow, raises your heart rate, and has you breathing more deeply.

     You get about half of the health benefits from that one hour a day of Stage One puttering about. The other half of the benefits, however, derive from those 30 minutes, three times a week, of sustained Stage Two activities. This, we believe, is the least amount of physical activity to achieve the most health benefits, your long-term LifeFit goal.

     If you adhere to your LifeFit program for about six months, combining Stage One and Stage Two activities into a weekly program, you will realize significant reductions in your risk for a number of life-threatening diseases and add years to your life. You will also realize a number of benefits in terms of psychological health and cognitive functioning. And you will become much more fit than you were before becoming active, within the bounds of your genetic endowment.

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    Sitting for long periods at a desk has been shown to be harmful to your health due to your body’s lack of activity. In fact, some research claims that sitting for eight hours without exercise increases your chances of dying prematurely by 60 percent. While some people opt for standing desks, most office workers have no choice but to tough it out. What to do?

    According to research published in The Lancet, exercising for an hour daily can counteract the detrimental effects of all that sitting. Cancer and heart and artery disease are the maladies most associated with the dangers of prolonged sitting, so if you have predisposition for those illnesses, be proactive and get to the gym as often as possible.
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    The summer is a great reason to get in shape. However, when the weather gets warm, you need to be careful about getting too hot or dehydrated when exercising. It's best to exercise during the times of day that are least hot, such as early in the morning or late evening, and protect yourself from the sun with sunscreen -- if there's light in the sky, you should wear it! If you're forced to work out during the hottest times of the day, go for a swim, or walk around an air-conditioned mall. Any physical activity is better than none! And stay hydrated!
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    Children inherently love to be active. Playground games such as Hopscotch and Follow the Snake offer great ways to attain cardiorespiratory fitness. By playing these games with children, you’ll burn calories and have fun at the same time!
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    Though yard work should not replace a regular workout, it can be a great supplement to your exercise routine. Chores in the yard can help you burn (extra) calories and work out various parts of your body. Raking leaves left over from the fall, for instance, can provide you with a great upper body workout. Similarly, pushing a manual lawn mower, trimming your hedges, pulling weeds from your garden and planting flowers and shrubs can all be effective workouts for your shoulder, back and leg muscles.

    The following are some activities you can do outdoors to burn extra calories:
    • Push-mowing the lawn: Sixty minutes burns between 350 and 400 calories.
    • Weed whacking: Thirty minutes burns 85 to 100 calories and helps strengthen and tone your core.
    • Weeding by hand: This and other gardening activities can burn between 200 and 600 calories per hour, depending on the intensity of the task.
    While yard work can be fun and healthy, it’s important not to strain your joints or muscles when working in the yard. Talk with your healthcare provider about ways to get your work done without putting too much strain on your body.

    Trinity Health recognizes that people seek medical information on a variety of topics for a variety of reasons. Trinity Health does not condone or support all practices covered in this site. As a Catholic health care organization, Trinity Health acts in accordance with the Catholic tradition.

    Please note, the information contained on this website is provided to supplement the care provided by your physician. It is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice. Always seek the advice of a qualified healthcare provider if you have questions regarding your medical condition or before starting any new treatment. In the event of a medical emergency, always call 911 or proceed to your nearest emergency care facility.