Dietary Supplements

Dietary Supplements

Whether you're visiting the drug store, grocery or natural food shop you'll likely find an aisle where there are jars and bottles of things for you to put in your body that are neither foods nor medicines. Ranging from vitamins and minerals to fiber and herbal remedies, these supplements are not regulated in the same way as either food or medicine. Some of them are backed by solid research, others are folk remedies or proprietary cures. If your diet does not include enough of certain vitamins or minerals, a supplement may be a good idea. Natural treatment for conditions like constipation may be effective. But because these substances are unregulated, it is always a good idea to educate yourself about the products and to use common sense when taking them. This is even more true if you are pregnant or taking a medicine that may be affected by supplements.

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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered
    Found in fish oil and certain plant and nut oils, like canola and flaxseeds, omega-3 fatty acids are heavy hitters in the fight against heart disease. Fish oil that contains both DHA (docosahexaenoic acid) and EPA (eicosapentaenoic acid) helps to lower triglycerides and reduces your risk for heart disease, heart attack, abnormal heart rhythms and lowers blood pressure.

    This content originally appeared on doctoroz.com
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    A answered
    Omega-3 rich fish oils are found in certain nuts and seeds (such as walnuts and flax seeds) andcold water northern fish (wild Alaskan salmon, cod, mackerel, sardines, and herring). A diet rich in fish oil has been associated with a significantly lower risk of having a heart attack or experiencing sudden death from a heart attack. However, the benefits of fish oils have little to do with effects on cholesterol. In fact high doses of fish oils taken in capsule form may actuallyraise LDL cholesterol. Fish oils mainly act to lower the risk of heart attack by thinning the blood, and countering inflammation in the arteries.

    Other studies have shown that fish oils can significantly lower triglycerides. This is another type of blood fat that when elevated can increase the risk of a heart attack. High triglycerides are associated with obesity and linked to diets high in refined carbohydrates (bakery products,foods rich in sugar or high fructose corn syrup) and sweetened drinks (sodas).

    A dose of 1 gram a day of omega-3 fish oil is recommended for preventing a first heart attack while 2 grams or more may be used to help prevent subsequent heart attacks in those who have already experienced one or to treat high triglyceride levels.
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    A , Naturopathic Medicine, answered

    Common oat products include:

    • Oat groats: Unflattened kernels good as breakfast cereals or in stuffings.
    • Steel-cut oats: Produced by running oats through steel blades, which thinly slice them, creating a denser, chewier texture.
    • Old-fashioned oats: These oats are steamed and then rolled; as a result, they have a flatter shape than other oats.
    • Quick-cooking oats: Similar to old-fashioned oats, but after steaming they are cut finely before rolling.
    • Instant oatmeal: Produced by partially cooking the oats rather than simply steaming them, and then rolling them very thin. Often sugar, salt, and other ingredients are added to make the finished product.
    • Oat bran: The outer layer of the grain that resides under the hull. While oat bran is found in all whole-grain oat products, it may also be purchased as a separate product that can be added to recipes or cooked to make a hot cereal.
    • Oat flour: A flour made from hulled oats that is used in baking and is often combined with wheat or other gluten-containing flours when making leavened bread.

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    Bovine colostrum is the pre-milk fluid produced by cow mammary glands during the first two to four days after giving birth. Bovine colostrum delivers growth, nutrient, and immune factors to the offspring.

    Traditional uses of bovine colostrum include eye conditions, oral health, and respiratory tract infections. The investigation of clinical effects of bovine colostrum in humans began in the late 1980s and continues today.
    Bovine colostrum may be useful for exercise performance enhancement and gastrointestinal injury due to bowel disease and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Although early evidence looks promising, additional study is still needed to determine the safety and effectiveness of bovine colostrum.

    Hyperimmune bovine colostrum is also commercially available, and some evidence exists for its use, as well as the use of isolated immunoglobulins (antibodies). Most evidence is in support of its use for diarrhea associated with certain types of bacterial and viral infections or immune system deficiencies.

    You should read product labels, and discuss all therapies with a qualified healthcare provider. Natural Standard information does not constitute medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment.

    For more information visit https://naturalmedicines.therapeuticresearch.com/
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    A OBGYN (Obstetrics & Gynecology), answered on behalf of
    If I can't breast feed, how will my baby get colostrum antibodies?
    If a mother is unable to breastfeed, her baby will eventually develop all of the necessary antibodies. Watch Nancy Rector-Finney, MD, with Methodist Children's Hospital, talk about the benefits of colostrum.
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    A , Naturopathic Medicine, answered
    Dietary sources richest in carnitine are red meats, particularly lamb and beef, and dairy products. Vegetables, fruits, and grains contain little or no carnitine, but the human body can make carnitine from the amino acid lysine, and legumes are a very good dietary source of lysine. There is no established RDA for carnitine; however, adults eating mixed diets that include red meat and other animal products obtain about 60–180 mg of carnitine per day. Vegans get considerably less, i.e., about 10–12 mg per day. Carnitine is supplemented from 500 to 4,000 mg per day.

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    Various inborn errors of metabolism related to carnitine metabolism exist, including genetic disorders related to carnitine-acylcarnitine translocase deficiency. Evidence suggests that carnitine may be used as part of a treatment plan for carnitine-acylcarnitine translocase deficiency, as well as for the management of general inborn errors of metabolism and carnitine uptake defects.

    You should read product labels, and discuss all therapies with a qualified healthcare provider. Natural Standard information does not constitute medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment.

    For more information visit https://naturalmedicines.therapeuticresearch.com/
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    A Psychiatry, answered on behalf of
    There were two studies done in Israel in which inositol was added to the regimen taken by bipolar patients who were no longer manic but were depressed. Inositol is sometimes referred to as "vitamin B8" and is sort of an unofficial B vitamin. It is also structurally similar to glucose. Inositol is present in large quantities in the membranes of nerve cells and is also involved in the functioning of serotonin neurons. Serotonin neurons are well known to play a role in depression. The principal side effect of inositol in high doses seems to be loose stools in some individuals..
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    Avoid in pregnant or breastfeeding women due to a lack of available scientific evidence.

    You should read product labels, and discuss all therapies with a qualified healthcare provider. Natural Standard information does not constitute medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment.

    For more information visit https://naturalmedicines.therapeuticresearch.com/
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    A , Naturopathic Medicine, answered

    A high manganese diet or manganese supplementation may be helpful in controlling seizure activity for some patients. Although there is no specific RDA for manganese, it is estimated that most people require between 2 and 5 mg per day. This can easily be met by regularly consuming nuts and whole grains, as these are the best sources of manganese.

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