Diagnostic Procedures

Diagnostic Procedures

Diagnostic Procedures
Allergy tests, echocardiograms, biopsies, semen analysis and spinal taps are just a few of the medical diagnostic procedures that are performed on patients diagnose diseases and conditions. These classification procedures do not involve x-ray imaging or a surgical procedure, but, involve taking measurements and samples of fluids, tissues and cells. Learn more about diagnostic procedures from our experts.

Recently Answered

  • 1 Answer
    A
    A Gastroenterology, answered on behalf of
    What are some new developments in endoscopy?
    Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD) is a new development in endoscopy. In this video, Trupti Shinde, MD, of Citrus Memorial Hospital, explains this technique.
  • 1 Answer
    A
    A Gastroenterology, answered on behalf of
    How do you stop bleeding during an endoscopy?
    Watch Trupti Shinde, MD, of Citrus Memorial Hospital, explain vasoconstrictive injections and heat probes as two techniques to stop bleeding during an endoscopy.
  • 1 Answer
    A
    A answered
    A thoracentesis can help diagnose lung cancer and determine how widely the cancer has spread.  During this procedure, the doctor places a needle between your ribs to drain fluid that has gathered around the lungs. This fluid is called a pleural effusion. The fluid is examined under a microscope for cancer cells.

    Cancerous pleural fluid can be a sign that the cancer has spread to the tissues that cover the lungs (called pleural membranes). Fluid buildup can also prevent the lungs from filling with air, so thoracentesis can improve your breathing.
  • 1 Answer
    A
    Are There Any Restrictions Post Endoscopy?
    After an endoscopy, patients are asked to refrain from driving or strenuous activity. In this video, Kesha Culbertson, RN, of Riverside Community Hospital, discusses what not to do after this procedure.
  • 1 Answer
    A
    What Happens After an Endoscopy?
    After an endoscopy a patient is immediately taken to the recovery area to be monitored, says Kesha Culbertson, RN, of Riverside Community Hospital. In this video, she explains the post-op process. 
  • 2 Answers
    A
    A Gastroenterology, answered on behalf of
    What can I expect when I arrive for an endoscopy?
    When you arrive for an endoscopy you'll have a preoperative check where you'll receive an IV and have your vital signs checked. Watch Trupti Shinde, MD, of Citrus Memorial Hospital, explain what you'll be asked during the process.
    See All 2 Answers
  • 2 Answers
    A
    What Happens During an Endoscopy?
    During an endoscopy the patient will be properly sedated, and then the endoscope is inserted. In this video, Kesha Culbertson, RN, of Riverside Community Hospital, explains what doctors will examine, depending on the procedure type.
    See All 2 Answers
  • 1 Answer
    A
    How Do I Prepare for an Endoscopy?
    Patients should not have anything to eat or drink 6-8 hours before an endoscopy. In this video, Kesha Culbertson, RN, of Riverside Community Hospital, describes how a patient should prepare for this procedure.
  • 2 Answers
    A
    Endoscopy is a nonsurgical procedure that uses a camera with a light to see your gastrointestinal tract. Before the procedure, you will usually be given medicine to make you feel sleepy and relaxed. This is called sedation and will make you more comfortable. The sedation used often works quickly and does not last long.
    See All 2 Answers
  • 1 Answer
    A
    A answered
    Transthoracic needle aspiration (TTNA) is a diagnostic procedure that is done to determine the cause of an abnormality on the lung. The abnormality may have been detected initially on a chest x-ray or another type of imaging scan.

    You may be given a sedative just before the procedure. To perform TTNA, your doctor will first clean the skin in your chest area and inject a local anesthetic before inserting a long needle into the chest wall, between your ribs, to take a sample of lung tissue for a biopsy. The doctor may use ultrasound or computed tomography (CT) to guide the needle directly to the area of the lung where the abnormality was detected. The tissue sample is then sent to a laboratory for analysis. A followup X-ray is done within a few hours to make sure there are no complications from the procedure.

    TTNA is usually performed to rule out cancer, but can also be helpful in diagnosing some lung infections caused by bacteria, viruses or fungi.