Depression Complications

Depression Complications

Depression Complications
Medically untreated depression puts people at higher risk for infectious diseases, type 2 diabetes and heart problems. People who do not seek treatment for depression also fail to thrive in work, home and school settings. It can negatively affect relationships, sleep patterns and libido. In severe cases untreated depression can result in suicide.

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    A , Gastroenterology, answered

    Science has confirmed a powerful association between depression and serious medical conditions, including every element of metabolic syndrome (excess weight/obesity, high blood pressure, cholesterol abnormalities, elevated blood sugar and diabetes, and fatty liver.) Depression increases the risk of heart disease in healthy persons and increases the risk of dying in those who have had heart attacks. Depression is even associated with osteoporosis.

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    A answered

    Take time to find -- and do -- things that make you happy. It could mean better blood sugar. It's true. A study shows that depressed people may be 42% more likely to develop diabetes. And the stronger the sad symptoms, the greater the odds.

    Sad feelings, researchers suspect, can make you want to do some pretty unhealthy things -- like pig out before bed, sack out on the couch all day or maybe even smoke or drink. And those are all things that could put you on the road to diabetes. But bad habits are only part of the picture, experts note. Even in the absence of bad habits, depressed people are still more likely to develop diabetes. 

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    A , Psychology, answered
    How does depression affect appetite?
    Changes in appetite are one of the key symptoms seen in depression - some lose their appetite and don't eat enough, while others overeat. Watch me discuss how a change in appetite is a common symptom of depression.
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    Serious illness such as heart disease, diabetes or cancer sends some into depression. First the medications required can cause hormonal changes that effect mood. If the disease prevents you from eating and exercising optimally, negative moods can descend as well. Most of all, however, the onset of serious illness can cause a level of stress, fear and sadness that affects even the most upbeat. Anti-depressant medication can help you face the challenges that lay ahead. Check with your doctor to make it safe to take the mood medications with your other medications.
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    A , Administration, answered

    Depression can affect your ability to care for yourself during pregnancy and to care for yourself and your baby after giving birth. Depression in pregnant women is associated with low weight gain, alcohol and substance abuse, and sexually transmitted infections, all of which can harm mothers and babies. In addition, depression may make bonding with your baby difficult, thus possibly affecting your baby's overall development.

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    One potential complication of depression is self-medication with alcohol and/or drugs. Those suffering from depression may also experience poor concentration, disrupted sleep, decreased energy and/or apathy. Any and all of these issues may contribute to problems with work, school and relationships. However, the most worrisome complication of depression is suicidal ideation, which may result in suicide attempts.
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    Depression and diabetes has been associated with poor medication adherence, poor glycemic control and with an increased prevalence of complications in Type 2 diabetes.

    Untreated depression will make it less likely that you will be able to care for yourself and properly manage your diabetes. This poor self care -- which includes non-adherence to diet, less exercise, smoking, and not taking medications as directed -- results in poor overall health and complications.

    In people diagnosed with Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes, depression increases the risk for complications such as persistent hyperglycemia, microvascular and macrovascular complications, and in some cases, even death. It is important to note that these associations with complications and mortality exist even for those with mild depression, particularly for elderly patients, who have a five-fold increase in mortality.

    In summary, those with untreated depression in diabetes face a more difficult road than those without depression. They have an overall reduced quality of life with respect to psychological, physical, and social functioning. Those with untreated depression in diabetes also report a higher diabetes-related symptom burden and lower satisfaction with diabetes treatment.

    Due to the poor health outcomes associated with co-morbid diabetes and depression, including the increased risk of diabetes complications, such as heart, kidney, nerve, eye and foot problems, both conditions should be optimally treated to help reduce symptoms of depression and allow for good diabetes management.
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    A , Psychology, answered
    What are the health risks of untreated depression?
    Untreated depression will most likely get worse, because you are not dealing with the underlying issues that are causing symptoms. Watch neuropsychologist Sanam Hafeez, PsyD, discuss the various risks of not treating depression symptoms properly. 
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    Talk to your primary care doctor if you have diabetes and think you may be depressed. He or she can properly diagnose you, or can find someone qualified to make the diagnosis. If you do not feel comfortable talking to your doctor, are unsure where to go for help, or just want to talk more about depression, others who can help you include:
    • Regional or community mental health centers
    • Hospital psychiatry departments and outpatient clinics
    • Mental health programs at universities or medical schools
    • Psychiatrists, psychologists, licensed social workers or mental health counselors
    • State hospital outpatient clinics
    • Family services, social agencies or clergy
    • Peer support groups
    • Private clinics and facilities
    • Employee assistance programs in the workplace
    • Local medical and/or psychiatric societies
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    A Healthcare, answered on behalf of
    Not only is depression linked to heart disease, but many people diagnosed with heart disease are subsequently at risk for depression -- especially female patients. As cardiologist Dr. Nieca Goldberg says, women under age 60 are particularly susceptible to depression because a heart attack is such a major psychological trauma, especially when it occurs at a younger age. Studies show, she adds, that depression is an important risk factor for adverse outcomes in cardiac event survivors:

    “It’s a life-changing, stressful event. It’s a shocking experience. There are constant concerns among survivors about whether they are going to be able to return to their usual life.”
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