Daily Skin Care

Daily Skin Care

Daily Skin Care
Develop a daily skin care routine that cleanses, moisturizes and protects your skin. All skin types can benefit from a gentle, non-drying cleanser, an exfoliant and broad-spectrum protection from sun damage. Choose cleansers that will remove dirt and bacteria while moisturizing the skin with emollients and humectants. Even if you’re not prone to breakouts, a topical exfoliant such as a lotion with alpha hydroxy acid will remove sun damage and keep skin supple as you age. Finally, using a sunscreen that protects against UVA and UVB rays daily will prevent wrinkles and skin cancer.

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    A , Dermatology, answered
    How do nutraceuticals work to promote healthy, younger-looking skin?
    Nutraceuticals, which are functional foods and supplements, work from inside your body to promote healthy, younger-looking skin. Watch dermatologist Doris Day, MD, explain how nutraceuticals work to positively impact the health of skin and hair.
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    A , Dermatology, answered
    Let's talk daily skin care, cleansing, oil control, moisturizers and sun protection factor (SPF). While oily areas can be limited to the t-zone (combination skin), or affect the entire face (oily skin type), I'm a big believer in simplicity and convenience when it comes to skin care. Today's cosmetic technology allows one to use products over the whole face avoiding the anxiety of where exactly to apply something.
    • Cleanse. Use either a gentle soap-free cleanser or if you're really wanting to cut through and remove grease and grime, use a cleanser containing between 10-15% buffered glycolic acid.
    • Oil Control. We have come a very long way in oil control technology. Microscopic polymer sponges literally soak up excessive oiliness without leaving skin dried out. When reading labels, look for the ingredient acrylates copolymer. Avoid silicon- based skin primers/oil-control products. These lie upon the surface of the skin on top of the oil. Skin may appear mattified, but in reality, it's an illusion. Envision plastic wrap on top of olive oil. Skin becomes smothered and oils push more deeply into the glands, encouraging acne outbreaks.
    • Moisturize. If your skin is oily, does it need a moisturizer? Probably not; at least not one used all over every single day. Remember, sebum is a moisturizer. Combine that along with hydration provided by sunscreen and any anti-aging creams/lotions and skin is good to go. Of course, this may vary by season or if you have extremely dry zones. The best rule of thumb is pay attention to what your skin is telling you and act accordingly.
    • Sun Protection. No skin care routine is complete without sunscreen. I have my personal bias as I have been plagued throughout my life with oily skin. While I have found that there are innumerable sunscreens on the market labeled as oil-free, or lightweight, none were equal to the challenge of my skin. Look for those containing oil-reducing polymers which soak up only the excessive skin oils. They mattify without leaving your skin dry or irritated (meaning they are ideal for any and all skin types). And make certain your sun protection is labeled broad spectrum (ultraviolet-A [UVA] and ultraviolet-B [UVB]), and use a minimum of SPF 30.
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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered
    There are a variety of different skin toners marketed to men and to women. Whether you're a man or a woman, if you're interested in using a skin toner, check with your dermatologist about which products might be right for you. People with sensitive skin should avoid products that contain alcohol. Even people with acne should avoid alcohol-based astringents, since these products can remove some of your skin's natural oils.
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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered
    Skincare products for women are not necessarily better or worse than those for men. What can be most helpful is to choose products that are well-suited to your skin type and your skin's needs. For example, if your skin is acne-prone, your dermatologist may recommend looking for noncomedogenic products that are unlikely to clog pores. If your skin gets irritated easily, products formulated for sensitive skin may be best for you. Your dermatologist can help you determine the kind of skin you have and the types of products you should be using. 

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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered
    Skincare products for women may or may not be more expensive than those for men, but it shouldn't cost too much for most people to keep their skin healthy and looking good. What's important is to choose products that are well-suited to the needs of your type of skin. For example, if your skin is acne-prone, you may want to look for noncomedogenic products that are less likely to clog pores. Products for sensitive skin often leave out common irritants, such as alcohol. Ask your dermatologist to guide you in choosing the best products for you.

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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered
    Whether you’re a man or a woman, it’s important to take good care of your skin to keep it healthy. Start by using sunscreen with a sun protection factor (SPF) of 30 or higher on a daily basis. According to the American Academy of Dermatology (AAD), most people -- including men -- can also benefit from using a daily moisturizer. Using a gentle cleanser for daily washing, rather than a harsh soap, can also be beneficial. Speak to your dermatologist about the best way to care for your skin, and let him or her know if you notice any changes to your skin.

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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered
    Whether you’re a man or a woman, it’s important to care for your lips by using a lip product with a sun protection factor (SPF) of 15 or higher. Men may be less prone to wrinkles above the lips, due to the support that mustache hairs provide for the skin. Pay careful attention to your lips and tell your dermatologist about any unusual skin changes.

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    Coconut oil, made from the dried fruit of the coconut palm tree, can be used on your skin in the following ways:
    • Instead of reaching for that makeup remover, use a cotton ball to rub coconut oil over your mascara and eyeliner for an easy, natural solution. (It even works on waterproof makeup.)
    • If you have dry or combination skin, make coconut oil part of your nightly routine by massaging a dime-sized amount over your face and neck (circular motions are best), then washing off the excess with your favorite facial cleanser.
    • For a great natural scrub, mix one part melted coconut oil with two parts brown sugar to use as an alternative to expensive exfoliators.
    • Coconut oil can be a great substitute for your favorite hand and body lotion. After showering or washing your hands, apply small amounts of coconut oil anywhere on your skin where a little moisturizing pick-me-up is needed.
    Trinity Health is a Catholic health care organization that acts in accordance with the Catholic tradition and does not condone or support all practices covered in this site. In case of emergency call 911. This site is educational and not a substitute for professional medical advice, always seek the advice of a qualified healthcare provider.
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    A answered
    Here are some common mistakes you may be making when you wash your face. With a few tweaks, you'll be on the path to clearer, more radiant skin.
    • You use hot water. Like a nice hot shower, you may tend to wash your face with hot water because it feels good. But for a gentle and effective cleanse, go for lukewarm or cool temperatures at the sink.
    • You wash your face with your hands. Make sure your hands are clean if you're touching your face. Otherwise, you may be putting bacteria on your skin.
    • You use the wrong cleanser. If you use a cleanser that's too harsh, it can make skin irritated, red or tight. And if it's too gentle, you'll have to wash hard or twice just to get a thorough cleanse.
    • You wash your face too much. Overdoing it on washing can make your skin look older and irritate it to the point that it overproduces oil. Don't wash skin more than twice a day (though it's okay to wash your face before or after a workout).
    • You don't cleanse in the morning. Wash your face when you wake up, even if it doesn't feel dirty. That way you remove any dirt or oils that accumulated overnight (such as from your pillowcase). You can just wash with a splash of warm water if you cleansed at bedtime.
    • You don't let products sit long enough. Most products need some time to work. Lather your face for at least a minute before rinsing to give the cleanser time to work its magic.
    • You fail to rinse thoroughly. If you don't rinse well enough, residue will build up. And that can dry out skin and clog pores. Be sure to rinse your nose, hairline and jaw line, all spots that people often neglect to rinse.
    • You exfoliate too much. When you exfoliate, you slough off dead skin cells, which helps improve your skin's tone and texture. Exfoliate in moderation; otherwise, you'll irritate your skin.
    • You use facial wipes too often. Don't use them as a substitute for your regular cleanser. Once you have time, use your regular cleanser to thoroughly clean your face.
    • You rub your face dry. Fight the urge to rub your face dry. It can feel good, but you can harm your skin with too much pulling and tugging. You can cause inflammation, which makes skin red and irritated. Instead, pat skin dry gently.
    • You don't apply a moisturizer fast enough. Put on moisturizers immediately after you cleanse. Applying a hydrating moisturizer will help lock in the moisture you got when you washed your skin.
    This content originally appeared on HealthyWomen.org.
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    A , Dermatology, answered
    Dr. Doris Day - How is phytic acid used to treat skin?
    Phytic acid is one of the gentlest of all the acids; it's great for those with sensitive skin or those with rosacea. In this video, dermatologist Doris Day, MD, discusses the skincare benefits of phytic acid, how to use it and where to find it.