Daily Skin Care

Daily Skin Care

Daily Skin Care
Develop a daily skin care routine that cleanses, moisturizes and protects your skin. All skin types can benefit from a gentle, non-drying cleanser, an exfoliant and broad-spectrum protection from sun damage. Choose cleansers that will remove dirt and bacteria while moisturizing the skin with emollients and humectants. Even if you’re not prone to breakouts, a topical exfoliant such as a lotion with alpha hydroxy acid will remove sun damage and keep skin supple as you age. Finally, using a sunscreen that protects against UVA and UVB rays daily will prevent wrinkles and skin cancer.

Recently Answered

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    A , Pharmacy, answered
    Sunscreens should not be used on infants younger than 6 months of age, as the risk of side effects is greater for children so young. Infants younger than 6 months should not be exposed to the direct sun. Children older than 6 months should have their exposure to the sun limited.
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    A , Dermatology, answered
    Phytosterols are cholesterol-like molecules found in plants such as soy and wheat and are used as emollients in topical creams and lotions.
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    A , Dermatology, answered
    Dr. Howard Brooks - How do I take care of combination skin?
    Combination skin is both dry and oily -- usually in the T-zone -- so you need to address both issues. Watch me explain why products with glycerides are beneficial, and why using a moisturizer with SPF is essential.
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    A , Dermatology, answered

    The products you put on your skin to make it more beautiful may actually be causing your problems. On any given day, the average woman uses at least twenty-five different products on her skin, containing hundreds of chemicals (both synthetic and natural). They obviously influence how oily or dry your skin feels. They can also cause irritation or even allergic reactions and may clog your pores and cause acne. And it's possible that they may interact with one another and become more harmful. Something as simple as what you use to wash your face, or the way you wash it, can create a host of complexion troubles. Washing too much (especially with a cleanser containing drying detergents, alcohol-based gel formulations, or salicylic acid) can dry out your skin. By the same token, oil-based cleansers or creams (and oil-based makeup) can cause breakouts.

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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered

    The search for the right type of toner begins with knowing your skin type. If you have oily skin, you may wish to opt for an astringent, which can help get rid of excess oil. Dry and combination skin types can benefit from freshening and moisturizing toners.

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    A , Dermatology, answered
    First thing in the morning, do the following:
    • Step 1: Use a gentle cleanser with circular motions of your hands. Rinse off with a splash of water or with a wash cloth wrung out in warm water. Pat dry with a clean towel. You may also use a mild soap, rinse with warm water, and pat dry. Do not use bar-shaped cleansers that are made from detergents rather than soaps. These have been dubbed “syndet bars,” which stands for synthetic detergent bars. They are made from chemicals that are usually much more irritating to the skin than soap. The more glycerin in the soap, the more relatively moisturizing the soap is. Sometimes color and fragrance is added to the soap to make it more appealing to the user. Ideally the scents in soaps should come only from the essential oils since the fragrance and color add nothing to the actual cleansing process and serve only to increase the potential for irritation and allergic reactions.
    • Step 2: Apply a light moisturizer with SPF, which stands for Sun Protection Factor. Use upward strokes on your neck and forehead, and outward strokes or your cheeks, the area around your eyes, and between your brows. Never pull or press hard and never pull down.  Make sure the label states both UVA and UVB protection and an SPF of at least 15.
    • Step 3:  Apply either a foundation with a sunscreen, or a sunscreen product specifically made for facial skin. Again, stroke gently upward and outward, not down. If you are prone to acne, look for products that say non-comedogenic or non-acnegenic on the label. If areas of your skin tend to be especially dry, use creams rather than lotions since these are more moisturizing. I use the cream on most of my face, but I don’t put it on my forehead or nose, since those areas are oilier.
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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered
    First, don’t buy every product you see on pharmacy shelves. Using too many products or combination creams actually can irritate and redden your skin, making matters worse. You only need a moisturizer with SPF 30 during the day, and a mega-moisturizer at night. It doesn’t have to be expensive; just look for one that contains ceramides, which are natural elements of the skin that hold in moisture. They will increase radiance by temporarily plumping lines and boosting your glow. 

    You may want to consider fillers, products a dermatologist injects into facial lines (such as the ones that show how much you’ve smiled your whole life), along the jaw line, and also in the cheeks to do the job of collagen and support the skin, minimizing the look of wrinkles. These nonsurgical treatments can last 6 to 12 months.

     


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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered
    Skincare products for women are not necessarily better or worse than those for men. What can be most helpful is to choose products that are well-suited to your skin type and your skin's needs. For example, if your skin is acne-prone, your dermatologist may recommend looking for noncomedogenic products that are unlikely to clog pores. If your skin gets irritated easily, products formulated for sensitive skin may be best for you. Your dermatologist can help you determine the kind of skin you have and the types of products you should be using. 

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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered
    The air inside airplane cabins is very low in humidity -- much lower than air in houses or office buildings. In fact, humidity can get to be as low as 1% on long flights. That dry air can dry your skin and your hair. To protect your skin, replace lost moisture internally and externally. Drink plenty of water during the flight and be sure to apply moisturizer (yes, men too), to trap moisture in the skin. Ask your primary care doctor or dermatologist about other ways to protect your skin while traveling. 
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    To protect your skin from damage, you should first know that aging, sunlight, smoking and dryness all contribute to wrinkles, brown spots, large pores, redness and other imperfections. For instance, as you age, the top layer of skin doesn't turn over as often, leaving dead skin cells on the surface longer and giving your features a dull appearance and texture.

    This is also when the sun damage of your youth comes back to haunt you. That sun created free radicals that broke down the collagen in your skin, as well as the elastin fibers that keep skin flexible. If you've spent a lot of time in the sun, your skin may even have a leathery appearance.

    Preventing skin damage boils down to:
    • Protect yourself against the damaging effects of the sun by wearing sunscreen that protects against UVA and UVB rays. Put it on just like you put on moisturizer every morning (many moisturizers contain sunscreen), even if it's cloudy outside. Just sitting near a window or riding in a car exposes your skin to the sun's rays.
    • Quit smoking and stay away from second-hand smoke.
    • Take care of your skin. That means washing it with gentle cleaners and using moisturizer in the morning and at night.
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