Daily Skin Care

Daily Skin Care

Daily Skin Care
Develop a daily skin care routine that cleanses, moisturizes and protects your skin. All skin types can benefit from a gentle, non-drying cleanser, an exfoliant and broad-spectrum protection from sun damage. Choose cleansers that will remove dirt and bacteria while moisturizing the skin with emollients and humectants. Even if you’re not prone to breakouts, a topical exfoliant such as a lotion with alpha hydroxy acid will remove sun damage and keep skin supple as you age. Finally, using a sunscreen that protects against UVA and UVB rays daily will prevent wrinkles and skin cancer.

Recently Answered

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    A , Dermatology, answered
    Phytosterols are cholesterol-like molecules found in plants such as soy and wheat and are used as emollients in topical creams and lotions.
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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered
    First, don’t buy every product you see on pharmacy shelves. Using too many products or combination creams actually can irritate and redden your skin, making matters worse. You only need a moisturizer with SPF 30 during the day, and a mega-moisturizer at night. It doesn’t have to be expensive; just look for one that contains ceramides, which are natural elements of the skin that hold in moisture. They will increase radiance by temporarily plumping lines and boosting your glow. 

    You may want to consider fillers, products a dermatologist injects into facial lines (such as the ones that show how much you’ve smiled your whole life), along the jaw line, and also in the cheeks to do the job of collagen and support the skin, minimizing the look of wrinkles. These nonsurgical treatments can last 6 to 12 months.

     


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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered
    Skincare products for women are not necessarily better or worse than those for men. What can be most helpful is to choose products that are well-suited to your skin type and your skin's needs. For example, if your skin is acne-prone, your dermatologist may recommend looking for noncomedogenic products that are unlikely to clog pores. If your skin gets irritated easily, products formulated for sensitive skin may be best for you. Your dermatologist can help you determine the kind of skin you have and the types of products you should be using. 

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    A answered

    Alpha hydroxy acids and beta hydroxy acids both smooth skin’s outer surface and speed up cell turnover, which slows with age. AHAs (also called glycolic or lactic acids) are water-soluble and come from fruit and milk sugars; BHAs, such as salicylic acid, are oil-soluble, so they help to clean out clogged pores. BHAs are made from willow bark and sweet birch trees. In high concentrations, both AHAs and BHAs can help fade brown spots and fine wrinkles, but they also make skin extra sun sensitive, so sunscreens are mandatory when you’re using them.

    Although lots of products, from face washes to toners, scrubs, and masks, include AHAs, the concentration is often too low to do much. If you find a label that gives the percentage, try not to go above 8 percent. In all honesty I’m not a huge fan of AHAs and prefer my patients to use BHAs. Alpha hydroxyl acids tend to be more irritating and stinging than BHAs, so I recommend experimenting with them first before loading up on a month’s supply. I find that BHAs are not only less irritating, but also can be better for acne. One brand in particular that I like is Clinique, which sells a great toner made with salicylic acid, a classic BHA. (Clinique calls them clarifying lotions, even though they are in liquid form; they come in four different strengths. The most popular strength is 2, which is for combination skin—oily in the T-zone but dry in other areas.)

    Contrary to conventional wisdom, you don’t need to use these products every day, especially if you’ve got sensitive skin. Start by using them once every other day, or simply a couple of days per week. You can expect some initial stinging at first, but this may subside as your skin gets used to it. If it never seems to warm up to hydroxy acids, don’t panic. There are other ways to trigger cell turnover.

    From The Mind-Beauty Connection: 9 Days to Less Stress, Gorgeous Skin, and a Whole New You by Amy Wechsler.

    Take the RealAge Test!

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    A , Dermatology, answered

    When it sits on top of your skin, the complexion appears hydrated, smoother, and healthier. But do those miracle ingredients ever make the journey down to the extracellular matrix? There are two ways any topical ingredient can get through the skin: either by penetrating the bricks and mortar (the skin cells and fatty ceramides) of the intact epidermis or by taking a hypothetical shortcut through the pores (the follicles and sweat glands). The pores allow ingredients to bypass the first stratum corneum layer and go farther down, where they have a better chance of getting into the dermis. But the walls of the tunnel-like follicle still have the bricks-and-mortar structure and basement membrane surrounding it, so the obstacles and locked doors to the dermis still exist.

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    A , Dermatology, answered
    Dr. Howard Brooks - How should I take care of my face if I have oily skin?
    If you have oily skin, you still need to moisturize; you also need to use a gentle cleanser with glyceride, and a moisturizer with SPF. Watch dermatologist Howard Brooks, MD, explain this routine, and share a natural recipe for a healing mask. 
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    A , Dermatology, answered
    To treat itchy skin, look for petrolatum, menthyl lactate, bisabolol, allantoin, and zinc oxide. For dry skin, look for petrolatum, squalane, urea, oleic acid, lecithin, cholesterol, and sodium lactate.
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    A , Dermatology, answered

    Preservatives are ingredients that kill bacteria to prevent a product from contamination.

    The common preservatives used are:

    • Tocopherol acetate (vitamin E derivative; is also an emollient and
             antioxidant).
    • Propylene and butylene glycols (also humectants)
    • Disodium and tetrasodium EDTA
    • Diazolidinyl and imidazolydyl urea
    • Parabens (Methylparaben, polyparaben, butylparaben, etc.)
    • Phenoxyethanol
    • Methylisothiazolinone
    • Ascorbyl palmitate (a derivative of vitamin C)
    • Benzoic acid
    • Benzyl alcohol
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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered
    What's an inexpensive drugstore product that treats skin problems?

    Most medicine cabinets are full to bursting with skin care products. In this video, Dr. Oz reveals how you can solve many of your skin problems with one inexpensive product.


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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered
    The air inside airplane cabins is very low in humidity -- much lower than air in houses or office buildings. In fact, humidity can get to be as low as 1% on long flights. That dry air can dry your skin and your hair. To protect your skin, replace lost moisture internally and externally. Drink plenty of water during the flight and be sure to apply moisturizer (yes, men too), to trap moisture in the skin. Ask your primary care doctor or dermatologist about other ways to protect your skin while traveling. 
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