Daily Skin Care

Daily Skin Care

Daily Skin Care
Develop a daily skin care routine that cleanses, moisturizes and protects your skin. All skin types can benefit from a gentle, non-drying cleanser, an exfoliant and broad-spectrum protection from sun damage. Choose cleansers that will remove dirt and bacteria while moisturizing the skin with emollients and humectants. Even if you’re not prone to breakouts, a topical exfoliant such as a lotion with alpha hydroxy acid will remove sun damage and keep skin supple as you age. Finally, using a sunscreen that protects against UVA and UVB rays daily will prevent wrinkles and skin cancer.

Recently Answered

  • 1 Answer
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    A , Dermatology, answered

    Preservatives are ingredients that kill bacteria to prevent a product from contamination.

    The common preservatives used are:

    • Tocopherol acetate (vitamin E derivative; is also an emollient and
             antioxidant).
    • Propylene and butylene glycols (also humectants)
    • Disodium and tetrasodium EDTA
    • Diazolidinyl and imidazolydyl urea
    • Parabens (Methylparaben, polyparaben, butylparaben, etc.)
    • Phenoxyethanol
    • Methylisothiazolinone
    • Ascorbyl palmitate (a derivative of vitamin C)
    • Benzoic acid
    • Benzyl alcohol
  • 1 Answer
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    A , Dermatology, answered

    Yes and no. First of all, just because they are developed and endorsed by doctors, that doesn't make them prescription strength by any means. As with makeup artist brands or professional hair stylist lines, dermatologists back up their products with their expertise and years of know-how. So their professional reputation is on the line. Consumers definitely respond to personal brand names. Having a doctor's name either on the label or endorsing a product substantiates its validity as we tend to trust what doctors tell us. Some doctor brands may actually be better because they are believed in, developed and researched by the physician. Also, doctors get direct and immediate feedback from their patients. If they try a new product and have a bad reaction, it will be improved and perfected immediately. In a way, this is a valuable human-controlled clinical test. It's a privilege to hear and see those real responses, which is something huge corporations lack. There are pros and cons to all different kinds of skin care products, and the one thing to remember is that most creams and lotions are essentially pretty similar: for the most part they are safe, but they are not the skin-transforming, life-changing fountains of youth that we'd love them to be.

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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered

    The search for the right type of toner begins with knowing your skin type. If you have oily skin, you may wish to opt for an astringent, which can help get rid of excess oil. Dry and combination skin types can benefit from freshening and moisturizing toners.

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    A , Dermatology, answered
    Most of the ingredients in any product are inactive. Their secondary function is to benefit the skin directly. These substances work together to create a base that carries the active ingredients (a moisturizer, detergent, or sunscreen), and, as a by-product, they can also benefit the skin. Some of these (especially certain preservatives) may be potentially irritating. These inactive ingredients make a cream glide on smoothly or help a cleanser lather up. They are the preservatives that prevent the product from decomposing and make it resistant to bacteria, or the buffers that control its acidity and pH balance. There are thickening agents, and there are emulsifiers that allow oily and water-based materials to mix so ingredients don't separate. Some ingredients create the color of a product, and some make it smell nice. Each has an important function, and many have multiple jobs. So "inactive" is something of a misnomer; these are very functional ingredients indeed.
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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered
    Skincare products for women are not necessarily better or worse than those for men. What can be most helpful is to choose products that are well-suited to your skin type and your skin's needs. For example, if your skin is acne-prone, your dermatologist may recommend looking for noncomedogenic products that are unlikely to clog pores. If your skin gets irritated easily, products formulated for sensitive skin may be best for you. Your dermatologist can help you determine the kind of skin you have and the types of products you should be using. 

  • 5 Answers
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    A , Internal Medicine, answered
    Going to the beauty counter is like going to the supermarket -- there are millions of products, and many times you have no idea which ones are healthy and which ones aren't. And many offer double robbery: they weigh down your skin and lighten your pocketbook. Look for products that list an "active ingredient" and a particular concentration. Vitamins and supplements in skin lotions, creams, and potions usually have to be in the one to 10 percent range to really do something for or to your skin. The formulations also need to be pH balanced and the active ingredient must be able to penetrate the skin. Your best bet is to try reputable brands, but even some of those use ingredients that could only enter the skin in a science fiction movie. The bottom line is that you have to read the label, and use products that only contain scientifically proven ingredients (see below). Remember that cosmetic products are just that -- cosmetic.

    Products that make therapeutic claims must be scientifically proven to be safe and effective and are regulated as drugs by the FDA. Dr. Perry's NightSkin (vitamins A and C, glycolic acid, and the herbal skin lightener licorice extract) and Dr. Perry's DaySkin (zinc oxide/titanium dioxide sunblock, vitamins B3, B5, and E) are two examples of skin creams with a scientific basis. (Of course, we saw the science and recruited him to work with us.)

    Stay away from hexapeptides, collagen, hyaluronic acid, and growth factors that don't have a chance of penetrating the skin.
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    A , Allergy & Immunology, answered
    If you have sensitive skin, strong colognes, fragrances, scented cosmetics and facial products may irritate you after contact with any of those just mentioned. The irritation may present symptoms similar to those of eczema or rosacea. Sunlight may even make these symptoms worse for those who are "photosensitive" and therefore might develop a sunburn-like rash as a result of a combination of exposure to sun and the aforementioned products.
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    A , Dermatology, answered
    To treat itchy skin, look for petrolatum, menthyl lactate, bisabolol, allantoin, and zinc oxide. For dry skin, look for petrolatum, squalane, urea, oleic acid, lecithin, cholesterol, and sodium lactate.
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    A , Dermatology, answered
    Mineral oil, also called liquid paraffin, liquid petrolatum, white mineral oil, and white paraffin oil, is used to prevent skin drying and irritation.
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    A , Dermatology, answered
    Dr. Howard Brooks - How should I take care of my face if I have oily skin?
    If you have oily skin, you still need to moisturize; you also need to use a gentle cleanser with glyceride, and a moisturizer with SPF. Watch dermatologist Howard Brooks, MD, explain this routine, and share a natural recipe for a healing mask. 
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