Critical Care

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  • 1 Answer
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    A Emergency Medicine, answered on behalf of
    You should wait before going to the emergency room (ER) under certain circumstances. If you’ve got some abdominal pain and you have one episode of vomiting and one episode of diarrhea, and you’re starting to feel better, you can tolerate some soup, the pain is slowly getting better, it doesn’t hurt when you get up and walk, you might say, “You know what? I’m going to wait it out for another hour or two and see what happens.”

    You should not wait to go to the ER if you have symptoms that are concerning, that are getting worse, that aren’t getting better, that are preventing you from doing just normal activities -- you can’t get up and walk because the pain is so bad. Or, you can’t eat because you are vomiting all the time, or your diarrhea has gotten to the point where you are light-headed and dizzy, then absolutely you need to be seen in an emergency department for those things.
     
    Trinity Health recognizes that people seek medical information on a variety of topics for a variety of reasons. Trinity Health does not condone or support all practices covered in this site. As a Catholic health care organization, Trinity Health acts in accordance with the Catholic tradition.

    Please note, the information contained on this website is provided to supplement the care provided by your physician. It is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice. Always seek the advice of a qualified health care provider if you have questions regarding your medical condition or before starting any new treatment. In the event of a medical emergency always call 911 or proceed to your nearest emergency care facility.
  • 1 Answer
    A
    A Emergency Medicine, answered on behalf of
    If you come into the emergency room (ER) with heart attack symptoms, such as chest pain, but it's indigestion, ER doctors will perform tests to determine what is causing your chest pain. They may perform an electrocardiogram (EKG), a chest x-ray or blood tests, and then say “We have good news. It doesn’t look like it’s your heart, it looks like it may just be indigestion.”

    ER doctors see more people die from indigestion, which really turned out to be a heart attack that they should have been in the emergency department for. You should never be criticized for coming to the ER with what might have been a life-threatening event.
     
    Trinity Health recognizes that people seek medical information on a variety of topics for a variety of reasons. Trinity Health does not condone or support all practices covered in this site. As a Catholic health care organization, Trinity Health acts in accordance with the Catholic tradition.

    Please note, the information contained on this website is provided to supplement the care provided by your physician. It is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice. Always seek the advice of a qualified health care provider if you have questions regarding your medical condition or before starting any new treatment. In the event of a medical emergency always call 911 or proceed to your nearest emergency care facility.
  • 1 Answer
    A
    A Emergency Medicine, answered on behalf of
    I think it's always a good idea to check in with your primary care physician after visiting the emergency room for several reasons. One, theoretically, they know you better both medically and personally. Sometimes having their perspective on what went on is important. Primary care physicians should also see their patients right after or soon after they've been in the ER for ongoing care.
  • 1 Answer
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    Unfortunately, quality healthcare can come with a hefty price tag. An emergency room (ER) is expensive to run. That cost is seen in your bill. Fees will be much higher there than anywhere else. Even if your hospital ER is in your health insurance provider’s network, you may be required to pay the whole bill if your situation was not considered a true emergency.

    In some cases, you may need to rush to the nearest medical center, regardless of the cost. If your medical condition is not so severe and cost is an issue, you might consider urgent care. An ER may charge you twice. You might get a bill for the ER facilities and staff, and a separate one from the doctor. An urgent care center normally has only one bill.

    This content originally appeared on http://blog.mountainstar.com/
  • 2 Answers
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    One way to make sure your child receives good care in the emergency room (ER) is to provide an accurate and detailed description of your child's condition and medical history to the healthcare team. It is important to share this information. Understanding the history of the illness helps your doctor determine the cause and make a treatment plan.
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  • 2 Answers
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    An allergic reaction can cause mild symptoms to a severe, life-threatening condition called anaphylaxis. Severe allergic reactions can cause:
    • swelling of the face or throat
    • wheezing
    • difficulty breathing
    • stomach pain
    • nausea
    • vomiting
    • diarrhea
    • fainting (passing out)
    If you think your child may be having symptoms of a severe allergic reaction, you should call 911 immediately for your child to be taken to the emergency room. (Anaphylaxis requires emergency medical treatment.) 

    Mild allergic symptoms often involve an itchy rash made up of bumps called hives.
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  • 3 Answers
    A
    A Pediatric Emergency Medicine, answered on behalf of
    There are steps you can take to help keep your kids out of the emergency room (ER), including:
    • Childproof your home.
    • Call your pediatrician or family medicine doctor prior to heading to the ER. He or she may be able to take care of the issue in the office and can certainly guide parents in whether an emergency room visit is required.
    • Make sure your child wears a bike helmet and is in the appropriate car seat or seatbelt when in a car.  
    At the end of the day, not all accidents or illnesses can be prevented and a trip to the ER may be inevitable.   
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  • 2 Answers
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    A Pediatric Emergency Medicine, answered on behalf of
    The difference between a pediatric and adult emergency room (ER) is that although all emergency departments should have pediatric specific equipment and be staffed in pediatric care, studies have shown that many adult ERs have most, but not all of the recommended pediatric equipment. Emergency physicians and nurses are trained to see pediatric patients and can certainly stabilize critically ill children for transfer. However, ERs seeing a lower volume of pediatric patients may not be equipped to fully manage pediatric ER patients.
     
    Pediatric ERs will have pediatric trained physicians, nurses and other staff, such as child life specialists and respiratory therapists familiar with the pediatric airway. These are healthcare providers that see and treat only pediatric patients. They are aware of pediatric specific illnesses and take into consideration the developmental age of the child when examining and explaining treatment to the child and parents.  
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  • 4 Answers
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    What are the main reasons kids end up in the emergency room over the summer?
    With more unsupervized time over school breaks, kids can end up in the emergency room (ER). In this video, Lori Boyajian-O’Neill, OD, with HCA Midwest Health, shares tips to deal with kids' impulsive and risky behaviors -- especially during summer.
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  • 2 Answers
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    When should my child go to the emergency room (er) for abdominal pain?
    In this video, Matt Bush, MD, Medical Director of Medical City Dallas Hospital says to look for abdominal pain with fever, localized pain or severe pain as reasons for taking your child to the emergency room.
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