Critical Care

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    A , Emergency Medicine, answered
    When you arrive at the emergency room (ER) with a child, you will be seen in a triage area where a registered nurse (RN) will get a brief history of the nature of your child’s emergency and take your child’s vital signs. If the vital signs are concerning for something needing immediate attention, you and your child will be brought directly to a treatment room. If your child is well-appearing, you may be asked to wait in the pediatric waiting area until a room becomes available, although every effort is made to bring every child directly to a room if they are available.
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    A Emergency Medicine, answered on behalf of
    In general, you should not take your child to the emergency room (ER) for a fever. Fever is the number one reason for pediatric visits and they cause concern for parents, grandparents, schools and daycare. But fever is normal, and a healthy response to infection. It is a way the body mounts an immune response and indicates a healthy child. Since most children are immunized now against bacteria that caused most of the pediatric severe infections in the late 1980s, there is little for doctors to do any more. That said, there are some cases when fever needs to be evaluated: In the newborn period up to 6 weeks but especially under 1 month, fever is an emergency. In the child on chemotherapy or with an immunity problem, it is an emergency. In the child who lacks a spleen, it is an emergency. In the ill-appearing or lethargic child, it is an emergency. In the child who seems to act well except for a decreased appetite, it is not. Most of these fevers are caused by viruses and they are normal in childhood. They can wait until the next day (most fevers occur after 5 p.m.). Treatment for fever is Tylenol or ibuprofen and fluids. These medications treat the fever only; the illness is still there and will run a course. Fever medications need to be given again when they wear off. They are for comfort. They are not curing the child. 
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    Level I and Level II centers are defined as definitive trauma care facilities. Definitive trauma care centers must be able to provide full services to trauma patients within the facility. Level II centers are not required to, but may, provide definitive care for pediatrics, serious burns and reimplantation of limbs.
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    How Do Doctors Determine When a Patient Should Enter Emergency Services?
    In this video, IIya Chern, Director of Emergency Department at Plantation General Hospital, describes how doctors decide when a patient should enter emergency services. 
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    What Is the Role of a Social Worker in the Trauma Unit?
    Watch Jessica Rigal, trauma social worker at Lawnwood Regional Medical Center & Heart Institute, explain the role of social workers in the trauma unit. 
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    How Do Medical Professionals Work Together in a Trauma Unit?
    Teamwork is essential for trauma care, according to Stanley Kurek, DO, FACS, medical director of the Trauma Center at Lawnwood Regional Medical Center & Heart Institute. Kurek explains why there must be a team approach to trauma care in this video.
     
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    What Should I Do When a Loved One Is Sent to the Trauma Unit?
    Watch Kathleen Anson, RN, trauma case manager at Lawnwood Regional Medical Center & Heart Institute, explain the steps family members and friends should take when a loved one is admitted to the trauma unit. 
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    Typically trauma patients arrive at the hospital by Emergency Medical Services (EMS) units. EMS alerts the emergency department (ED) that they are inbound with a trauma patient and this initiates a cascade of events behind the scenes. An alert is sent to the on-duty trauma team, which includes a trauma surgeon, emergency physician, anesthesiologist, an intensive care nurse, two ED nurses, respiratory therapist, radiology technician and a lab/blood bank technician. This team responds to the trauma room, which is specially equipped to rapidly assess and manage surgical emergencies.
     
    At the same time a team is responding to the trauma room, a computer tomography (CT) scanner and a CT technician are placed on hold and an operating room (OR) is placed on hold along with the staff needed for an OR case. Others such as the post-anesthesia care unit (PACU), intensive care unit (ICU), nursing supervisor and administration are also made aware of the trauma patient, to assure that he or she moves rapidly through all departments and is placed in the proper nursing unit to optimize his or her care.
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    A Emergency Medicine, answered on behalf of
    What Is the Role of 911 Operators in Emergency Services?
    Michael LoGuidice, DO, with emergency services at Citrus Memorial Hospital, explains the important role 911 operators play in emergency services. 
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    A Emergency Medicine, answered on behalf of
    What Is the Intensive Care Unit?
    The intensive care unit is a section of the hospital with one-on-one nursing and closer care, according to Michael LoGuidice, DO, with emergency services at Citrus Memorial Hospital. Learn more in this video.