Critical Care

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    A Emergency Medicine, answered on behalf of
    I think it's always a good idea to check in with your primary care physician after visiting the emergency room for several reasons. One, theoretically, they know you better both medically and personally. Sometimes having their perspective on what went on is important. Primary care physicians should also see their patients right after or soon after they've been in the ER for ongoing care.
  • 1 Answer
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    Unfortunately, quality healthcare can come with a hefty price tag. An emergency room (ER) is expensive to run. That cost is seen in your bill. Fees will be much higher there than anywhere else. Even if your hospital ER is in your health insurance provider’s network, you may be required to pay the whole bill if your situation was not considered a true emergency.

    In some cases, you may need to rush to the nearest medical center, regardless of the cost. If your medical condition is not so severe and cost is an issue, you might consider urgent care. An ER may charge you twice. You might get a bill for the ER facilities and staff, and a separate one from the doctor. An urgent care center normally has only one bill.

    This content originally appeared on http://blog.mountainstar.com/
  • 2 Answers
    A
    One way to make sure your child receives good care in the emergency room (ER) is to provide an accurate and detailed description of your child's condition and medical history to the healthcare team. It is important to share this information. Understanding the history of the illness helps your doctor determine the cause and make a treatment plan.
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    An allergic reaction can cause mild symptoms to a severe, life-threatening condition called anaphylaxis. Severe allergic reactions can cause:
    • swelling of the face or throat
    • wheezing
    • difficulty breathing
    • stomach pain
    • nausea
    • vomiting
    • diarrhea
    • fainting (passing out)
    If you think your child may be having symptoms of a severe allergic reaction, you should call 911 immediately for your child to be taken to the emergency room. (Anaphylaxis requires emergency medical treatment.) 

    Mild allergic symptoms often involve an itchy rash made up of bumps called hives.
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  • 3 Answers
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    A Pediatric Emergency Medicine, answered on behalf of
    There are steps you can take to help keep your kids out of the emergency room (ER), including:
    • Childproof your home.
    • Call your pediatrician or family medicine doctor prior to heading to the ER. He or she may be able to take care of the issue in the office and can certainly guide parents in whether an emergency room visit is required.
    • Make sure your child wears a bike helmet and is in the appropriate car seat or seatbelt when in a car.  
    At the end of the day, not all accidents or illnesses can be prevented and a trip to the ER may be inevitable.   
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    A Pediatric Emergency Medicine, answered on behalf of
    The difference between a pediatric and adult emergency room (ER) is that although all emergency departments should have pediatric specific equipment and be staffed in pediatric care, studies have shown that many adult ERs have most, but not all of the recommended pediatric equipment. Emergency physicians and nurses are trained to see pediatric patients and can certainly stabilize critically ill children for transfer. However, ERs seeing a lower volume of pediatric patients may not be equipped to fully manage pediatric ER patients.
     
    Pediatric ERs will have pediatric trained physicians, nurses and other staff, such as child life specialists and respiratory therapists familiar with the pediatric airway. These are healthcare providers that see and treat only pediatric patients. They are aware of pediatric specific illnesses and take into consideration the developmental age of the child when examining and explaining treatment to the child and parents.  
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  • 4 Answers
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    What are the main reasons kids end up in the emergency room over the summer?
    With more unsupervized time over school breaks, kids can end up in the emergency room (ER). In this video, Lori Boyajian-O’Neill, OD, with HCA Midwest Health, shares tips to deal with kids' impulsive and risky behaviors -- especially during summer.
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  • 2 Answers
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    When should my child go to the emergency room (er) for abdominal pain?
    In this video, Matt Bush, MD, Medical Director of Medical City Dallas Hospital says to look for abdominal pain with fever, localized pain or severe pain as reasons for taking your child to the emergency room.
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  • 2 Answers
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    You should go to the hospital if you have a fever over 104 degrees Fahrenheit. A fever that high can injure your body. A lower fever without any symptoms is not a reason to go to the hospital. However, you may need to go to the emergency room if you have a lower fever and these symptoms:
    • a lot of trouble breathing (shortness of breath)
    • a cut or break in the skin (wound) with thick green, yellow, tan or white fluid coming from it
    Call your doctor if you have a fever and aren't sure if you need emergency medical care.
     
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  • 2 Answers
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    A , Family Medicine, answered
    Evaluating a trauma patient can be very complex. Paramedics are trained to assess a trauma patient following these key steps:
    • In the first few seconds, they check for immediate life-threatening injuries.
    • If you have one, they will do their best to stabilize you and get you ready to be moved to an emergency department or trauma center.
    • If your injuries are not immediately life threatening, the paramedics will most likely examine you further. They will look for injuries that can be managed on the scene. 
    • They report your condition to the team at the emergency department.
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