Conception Achieved (Pregnancy)

Conception Achieved (Pregnancy)

The process of conception starts in the female reproductive organs. An egg is released into the fallopian tubes once a month to await fertilization. If a sperm reaches the egg and penetrates it, it is fertilized. Conception takes place during ovulation. This happens 2 weeks after the last day of your last menstrual cycle. If eggs are not fertilized, they are released through menstruation and process repeats next month.

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    A , Internal Medicine, answered
    Some women can just "tell" if they're pregnant. Maybe they have gut feeling, or maybe their bodies just feel a little bit different-their breasts may feel more tender, or they may have immediate aversions or cravings for food. But the only way to confirm pregnancy is through the identification of the hormone hCG in either blood or urine.

    The blood test is done in the doc's office, of course, and the urine test can be done at home. But hCG doesn't show up in blood until about 10 to 14 days after conception, and a standard urine pregnancy test may not even show as positive for up to four weeks after conception. So it's possible you won't know for sure until at least after you've missed a period. If you just can't wait, high-sensitivity home urine tests can give results between 7 to 10 days after ovulation-potentially before you've missed a period.

    Both standard and high-sensitivity urine tests are highly accurate. For home tests, use the first morning's urine (the concentration of hCG is higher), and wait 5 to 10 minutes for results.
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    A , Gynecology, answered
    If pregnancy is years away, the perfect solution would seem to be to simply store your eggs until you are ready to use them. Every day, I have patients that inquire about freezing eggs to increase the possibility of conceiving if life circumstances put pregnancy on hold.

    While freezing embryos (an egg that has been fertilized with sperm and is at an early stage of development) is very successful, the technique of cryopreservation of unfertilized eggs is improving every day but is still considered to be experimental. But if someone doesn’t have sperm in their life, there’s not a lot of choice.

    While an increasing number of pregnancies are resulting from frozen eggs, success is not guaranteed since a thawed egg is not always a viable egg. In addition, most women are also not thinking about freezing their eggs when they are in their twenties. By the time someone is considering it (usually in their late thirties), egg quality is already suboptimal. Still, if you have the money and don’t mind going through hormonal stimulation and egg retrieval, egg freezing is currently the best option to stop the clock.
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    A , Internal Medicine, answered
    The human body is designed to retaliate when a foreign matter invades it; that rebellion can come in the form of fevers, vomit, diarrhea, and the like, as your body finds ways to expel the bacteria, virus, or spoiled scallop. Yet in pregnancy, the mother's body shifts from rebel mode to ally mode, as it nurtures, feeds, and makes peace with what the body should perceive as a foreign invader—the fetus.

    Remember that 50 percent of the fetus's genes are from the father and theoretically can carry information that could sabotage the relationship between mother and child. But the mother's immune system overlooks this fact and seeks to protect the child anyway. In a way, you can consider pregnancy an immuno-suppressed state; the volume of mom's immune system is turned down as it deals with this foreign, yet welcome, invader.

    The most dangerous time for the newly created creature that is to become your child is prior to implantation in the uterine wall. If mom's immune system is not suppressed when the fertilized egg tries to land, it's bye-bye blastocyst. So exactly one day before implantation—six days after conception—the blastocyst produces a special enzyme that suppresses mom's killer T cells, preventing her from having an immune reaction against the baby-to-be's cells. Once the placenta is formed after implantation, it helps maintain the truce between these two potential adversaries.
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    A answered
    After the initial appointment, prenatal visits will be relatively brief, and will most likely include the following:
    • Urine sample to check for glucose (sugar) and protein
    • Blood pressure measurement to gauge whether your levels are normal
    • Weigh-in to make sure you are gaining enough weight and let you know if you're gaining too much
    • Checking the baby's heartbeat
    • Checking the size and position of your uterus and the baby by feeling your stomach
    • Providing information and education about what you can expect over the next month and any signs of problems you should look for
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    Your due date is calculated by adding 280 days (40 weeks) to the first day of your last menstrual period. This assumes a 28 day cycle with ovulation at about day 14. If cycles are longer, then adjustments may need to be made. For example if cycles are always 34 days apart, then add an additional 6 days to calculate the due date. Thus, you are actually adding 286 days to the first day of your last menstrual period in this case.
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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered
    dr_oz_webcast_widescreen_H.292_when_to_reveal_pregnancy

    Many women wait for some time before revealing their pregnancy. Watch this video to learn when you can feel safe telling people you are pregnant.


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    A OBGYN (Obstetrics & Gynecology), answered on behalf of
    Post-term pregnancy is defined as a pregnancy lasting 41 weeks or beyond, and there is a slight increased chance of stillbirth at 41 weeks. Most of the time we will offer an induction of labor at 41 weeks, unless the cervix is very unfavorable for delivery, then we will offer testing for that 41-to-42-week timeframe. This could include non-stress tests, which is where we put the baby on the monitor to make sure that the heart rate looks appropriate and do an ultrasound for fluid, because the fluid level can drop off fairly quickly after the age of 41 weeks; 42 weeks is generally the last time we would keep people pregnant, and we would usually induce their labor at that point if labor hasn't spontaneously happened prior to that.
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    A answered
    A urine test is sometimes a routine part of every prenatal visit, so you should drink a lot of water before your visit. These tests provide information about glucose (sugar) and protein levels. A high glucose level may indicate gestational diabetes, a form of diabetes that only occurs during pregnancy, while a high protein level could signal potential kidney problems or urinary infection.
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    A , Internal Medicine, answered
    The reproductive process seems simple enough. See sperm swim. See sperm fertilize egg. See Missy ask for a pony for her fifth birthday. But conception is far from simple. Here's how it happens, in a nutshell:

    Every woman is born with the number of eggs she'll have in her lifetime. Those eggs live in her two ovaries. Every month-during ovulation-the ovaries usually release one egg cell (not one each but one between the two ovaries-it is really a complex process) from its follicle and send it on a very dangerous journey inside the body.

    On the other side of the sheets, sperm begins the race when it hears the starter's pistol (ejaculation). Before that point, sperm must line up in a half mile worth of tubes before they get to the penis (which guys wish was half a mile long).

    With 300 million sperm contained in each man's ejaculation (that's the same number as the U.S. population), those sperm cells swim upstream with one gold-medal goal in mind-the egg. If unblocked by condoms or other barrier methods of birth control, they swim from the vagina and take the up escalator through the cervix to the uterus.

    With a lot of luck, a special lining in the fallopian tubes that contains small hair-like structures are sucking the egg downward at the same time, so the sperm, like Alaskan salmon, have to swim upstream.

    The thick-walled uterus is actually larger than a weightlifter's bicep and literally sucks on the penis and ultimately pulls the sperm into its chamber for fertilization. At that point, it's a dash to the finish to see which sperm cell can fertilize the egg first. If one does, the fertilized egg reaches an area of the uterine wall (womb) where it gets implanted.
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    A , Internal Medicine, answered
    The word imprinting may sound like something you've heard on CSI, but it's actually a form of epigenetics. Even though two copies of a given gene are inherited, one from mom and one from dad, in certain circumstances, one is permanently turned off. The non-expressed one is said to be imprinted. As of now, we know of at least 80 genes that are imprinted by epigenetic markers, causing them to be active or inactive in the offspring based on parent of origin.
    In general, expressed genes that are inherited from the mother conserve maternal resources and limit fetal growth, while expressed genes that are inherited from the father promote fetal growth, even at the expense of the mother. Problems can occur when genes that are supposed to be imprinted, or turned off, are not, or when the wrong parent's gene is imprinted. The gene for insulin-like growth factor 2 (IGF2) is normally turned on from the father and off from the mother. If the mother's copy is not turned off, the child can develop Wilms tumors of the kidney. Loss of imprinting of the mother's IGF2 gene later in life can contribute to age-related cancers, including cancer of the prostate and colon.