Children's Emotional Health

Children's Emotional Health

Children's Emotional Health
Children's emotional health is just as important as their physical health. Being your child's biggest fan helps your child develop healthy emotional responses. If you're a good role model, coping well with your life's challenges, can help your child develop positive emotional health. But children do develop emotional problems. A child who is prone to lying, who mistreats a sister or brother, who is very fearful may have an emotional problem. If you think your child has an emotional problem, you will help your child by talking to a counselor.

Recently Answered

  • 1 Answer
    A
    A Psychiatry, answered on behalf of
    Why Is Cyberbullying So Damaging?
    Cyberbullying is so damaging because of its magnitude and permanence. In this video, Martin Buxton, MD, a psychiatrist at Chippenham & Johnston-Willis Hospitals, says adolescents are particularly prone to the impact of cyberbullying. 
  • 1 Answer
    A
    A Psychiatry, answered on behalf of
    How Do I Know If My Child Is More Than Just “Sad” Or “Moody”?
    Knowing if your child is more than just sad or moody can be hard, says Martin Buxton, MD, a psychiatrist at Chippenham & Johnston-Willis Hospitals. In this video, he explains what clues might indicate depression, including a family history of mood disorders.
  • 1 Answer
    A
    A Psychiatry, answered on behalf of
    Why Do Some Kids Have A Harder Time Overcoming Challenges Such As The Loss Of A Boyfriend Or Girlfriend?
    Losing a boyfriend or girlfriend can be especially hard on adolescents, says Martin Buxton, MD, a psychiatrist at Chippenham & Johnston-Willis Hospitals. In this video, he explains how separation from the family makes this loss much greater. 
  • 2 Answers
    A
    A answered
    Mood disorders in children need to be distinguished from normal development. It’s normal for children who are 10 to 13 years old to be somewhat oppositional or noncompliant with their parents. If a child is surly at the dinner table but otherwise has good grades, healthy friends and engages in healthy activities, you need not worry about a mood disorder. Children who suddenly experience intense moodiness that lasts for several days or who seem chronically irritable or angry should be evaluated.

    Medication and psychosocial therapy can help control symptoms of mood disorders. Parents may want to seek help from a mental health professional for an evaluation.
    See All 2 Answers
  • 1 Answer
    A
    A answered
    The most common types of episodic mood disorders in children are depression, which is marked by a sudden onset of deep sadness lasting for a week or more, and bipolar disorder, which includes distinct episodes of elation or elevated mood that is different from usual. Children who seem chronically cranky or irritable may suffer from a mood disorder known as severe mood dysregulation. This occurs most frequently with children also diagnosed with attention deficit hyperactive disorder (ADHD) and oppositional defiant disorder.
  • 4 Answers
    A
    A , Psychology, answered

    Everyone has different things that trigger anger. These are your pet peeves and they really irk you when they happen. So while triggers vary from person to person, it's important to identify what sets you off. This way you can avoid anger provoking situations. Now, of course not all situations can be avoided, so we need to learn how to cope with them without getting all worked up.

    Anger triggers may change over time. For example, when you were a child not getting instant gratification for something you wanted may have been an anger trigger. Odds are as an adult; you have learned patience and don't throw a fit if you don't get what you want.

    So, how does this apply to children? Well, you can help your child identify what his or her triggers are by observing the events that cause frustration. Next, teach them to deal with or channel their anger appropriately. By doing this, not only are you helping your child work through the situation, but you’re teaching them the essential skills of self-control that can last a life time.

    See All 4 Answers
  • 1 Answer
    A

    Adolescents who experience extreme loneliness and low self-esteem tend to be concerned that their friendships are threatened by others. This can cause jealousy that can result in aggressive behavior.

    The researchers found that intimacy experienced through friendship begets vulnerability, which can result in jealousy and aggression.

    The study involved 500 fifth-through ninth-grade students who were evaluated to assess these vulnerabilities.

    The questions sought to find out the level of jealousy which resulted in hypothetical situations, such as if their best friend went with someone else to go shopping. The survey also probed peers about their perceived opinions of jealous behavior exhibited by others. The study concluded there is a link between self-esteem and jealousy, with students having a lower self-worth being more likely to become jealous.

    Jealous adolescents in the study also were more likely to become passively or physically aggressive.

    The study also reaffirmed current beliefs that females are more likely to get jealous than males. The researchers conducting the study attributed this assertion to the idea that girls tend to have higher standards of kindness, empathy, loyalty and commitment than boys, prompting them to become more jealous than boys when these standard are not achieved.

    Negative behavior that results from jealousy is motivated by a fear of losing friendships, so, while the behavior is destructive, it is nonetheless an attempt to protect the friendship.

  • 1 Answer
    A
    Just like with an adult, half of a child's happiness is determined by natural temperament. Social relationships with relatives and peers play a significant role. So do age-related factors such as school assignments and reputation. Other factors that affect children's happiness are exercise, play, spirituality, physical health, well-being, mental issues, and the amount of stress their parents feel.
  • 1 Answer
    A

    When a child experiences or is exposed to a traumatic incident, they may lose a sense of trust or security with the world around them. Reassure your child that they are loved and safe and help them through feelings of guilt by repeatedly reminding them that they are not at fault. Don't force them into acting brave or scold them for showing emotion. Help them regain a feeling of control in their lives by letting them choose activities or meal choices.

  • 2 Answers
    A
    A , Emergency Medicine, answered
    Absolutely, tell the school -- kids with different needs require different solutions. Not only does this help the school help your child, they may also have ideas for you. Share your concerns and any plans or solutions you’ve identified. Ask for their input: What services or support resources do they have? Work with the school to create an educational/support plan.
     
    If the source of the problem is something at school, such as a bully, it’s even more important to discuss the issues with the school and with your child.  Also consult with your child’s pediatrician.
    See All 2 Answers