Eating Disorders

Eating Disorders

Anorexia, binge eating, bulimiathese are all eating disorders. Women are more likely than men to develop an eating disorder; very often, it starts in the teen years. If you know someone with an eating disorder, encourage them to get helpas the disorder can cause serious physical problems, even be life-threatening. Depression and anxiety might be part of the picture as well. Be hopefulas psychotherapy, nutrition counseling, and medication treatment can help.

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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered
    bingeing junk food
    Food should be eaten at the table, not in front of the TV or computer. In this video, Drs. Roizen, Rome, and Oz discuss how to monitor your own food intake.


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    A answered
    Unfortunately, binge eating disorder (BED) is difficult to spot and often goes undiagnosed. The three main diagnostic features of BED, according to the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, are the following:
    • loss of control over the amount you're eating
    • marked distress over your binge episode
    • binge eating that occurs at least once a week for three months
    And at least three of the following occur:
    • eating more rapidly than normal
    • eating until you're uncomfortably full
    • eating large amounts of food when you're not hungry
    • eating alone because you're embarrassed by how much you're eating
    • feeling disgusted, depressed or very guilty after overeating
    Binge eating also usually occurs in the absence of purging or other regular compensatory behaviors, such as extreme exercise.

    This content originally appeared on HealthyWomen.org.
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    A , Marriage & Family Therapy, answered
    Symptoms of binge eating disorder include:
    • Episodes of binge eating, defined as eating an abnormally large amount of food and feeling out of control of eating, twice weekly on average for six months
    • Binges include shame about the amount ingested, eating when not hungry, rapid ingestion, and/or physical discomfort after eating
    • Episodes of binge eating cause emotional distress
    • Purging and other compensatory behaviors are not associated with binge eating disorder
    • Binge eating disorder cannot be diagnosed if one has an active diagnosis of anorexia nervosa or bulimia nervosa
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    A , Nutrition & Dietetics, answered
    Binge eating disorder causes obesity which is linked with some of the most prevalent and costly medical problems seen in daily practice. Obesity alone is a risk factor for Type 2 diabetes, hypertension, coronary artery disease, gallbladder disease, osteoarthritis, cancer, and early death. In combination with the metabolic syndrome, it further increases the risk of cardiovascular disease. In sum, obesity affects at least nine organ systems of the body.

    Note that the psychosocial complications of obesity may be as significant as the physical health concerns. Obese people, particularly those with extreme obesity, may experience discrimination and other difficulties in the workplace or in personal relationships, leadingto poor self-esteem, social withdrawal, depression, and other mental health problems. In addition, obesity may lower the individual’s perception of general health, while comorbid disorders and their effect on physical function may lower morale.

    Both psychosocial and other medical factors contribute to a decline in general health and quality of life. A continuum has been observed between mildly, moderately, and severely obese individuals, with quality of life worsening with increasing body weight and the number of acquired comorbid illnesses.
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    A , Marriage & Family Therapy, answered
    There is no known prevention for binge eating disorder. Eating regular, healthy meals and snacks to prevent hunger, removing tempting junk food or binge triggers, and learning new techniques to manage stress may all help one avoid binges.
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    A Physiology, answered on behalf of

    On the emotional side, food is soothing and comforting; it helps reduce stress and eases painful feelings, such as loneliness and hurt. When you head to the vending machine to quell the deadline jitters or open a box of cookies in the evenings when you feel lonely, you're trying to help yourself -- a good thing -- but you're using the wrong coping tool.

    There is also a slew of hormones, brain chemicals, and other physiological forces behind overeating that scientists are just beginning to sort out. But whether it's physiological or emotional, ultimately your body is asking to be soothed and comforted and to be given some pleasure. You can achieve this without food. Start making a list of all the other things that make you feel good. Going out with friends, calling a friend, reading, and watching movies are all great ways to boost your mood without boosting your calorie and carbohydrate intake. And we know that exercise burns calories and carbohydrates, and boosts mood.

    Meanwhile, get the worst food offenders away from you. Purge the house of cookies, chips, and other foods that get you into calorie trouble. To avoid feeling deprived, you might keep one small treat around, and make sure to have it only when you'll enjoy it most -- not in front of the TV, when you're barely paying attention to what you're eating, or when you're running out the door and don't have time to savor it. Don't get into a routine with unhealthy foods. For instance, after a few days of eating chips in the midafternoon, your body will come to expect the treat. So although it might be okay to have those chips, on occasion, don't always have them at the same time. That way, you'll have one less trigger to fight.

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    Once you have sought help for binge-eating disorder, you can begin working towards recovery. There are steps you can take outside your treatment plan to help prevent bingeing episodes. These include eating daily breakfasts and avoiding diets, as self-deprivation can exacerbate and even trigger bingeing episodes. Do not over-shop at the grocery store, as having extra food in the house makes it easier to binge. Keep a diary of your feelings and progress, and take up a hobby for enjoyment and stress-relief. Finally, ensure that you get plenty of exercise, stay in touch with loved ones for support, and adhere to your doctor's treatment plan as closely as possible.

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    A , Addiction Medicine, answered
    Yes.  To change, you have to be willing to get uncomfortable. My elementary school principal Mr. Shulke told me something I'm reminded of by your question: The most rewarding events in your life will invariably take you outside your comfort zone to get there!

    Likewise, to change the way you feed - think about this now, I'm talking about your NEED TO FEED - will take you outside your comfort zone. When impulse control fails, and oops, you're on the other end of your latest binge, you weren't victimized by the ice cream. You fell victim to your impulses.

    My call to you is to be willing to experience being uncomfortable! When you're in a craving, and it's 9pm and that quart (or gallon) of ice-cream is talking to you from the freezer, you will be uncomfortable when refusing to answer the craving call! In my book JUST 10 LBS I delve deeply into the emotional underpinnings of overeating. One of my Ten Commandments is I WILL NOT EAT AFTER 8PM (or 3 hours before bed) and this is a key to losing weight and living lighter. Check out the rest of my Commandments & Commitments on www.JUST10DIET.com.
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    A Nutrition & Dietetics, answered on behalf of
    A licensed therapist, or other medical professional, such as a medical doctor or psychiatrist, must diagnose an eating disorder. Only after a full evaluation assessment is conducted, and based on criteria reported by the patient as well as other medical conditions outlined in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM) can a formal diagnosis be made.  There are several different eating disorder diagnosis’s, Anorexia Nervosa (AN), Bulimia Nervosa (BN), and Eating Disorder, Not Otherwise Specified (EDNOS). In the next addition of the DSM Binge Eating Disorder (BED) will be its own diagnosis, rather than coming under the umbrella of EDNOS.
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    The first thing you should know when you go to an appointment to diagnose eating disorders is that treatment usually includes a team of doctors, including physicians, mental health professionals, and dieticians. Prior to the appointment, you should find out whether you need to fast for blood tests, or whether there are any other restrictions you will need to observe on the day of your appointment. You should write down all pertinent information - symptoms, any drugs or medications you are taking, personal and family medical history, and any questions you may have. It is important to note that your doctor will ask you questions regarding your self-image, as well as physical symptoms, so you should be ready to answer honestly. You should bring a family member or friend with you, because there may be a large amount of information that you will want to remember.