Chemical Toxins

Chemical Toxins

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    A , Internal Medicine, answered

    As Burt Lancaster in "The Swimmer" journeyed through the backyards of his suburban neighbors, dipping into their well-chlorinated swimming pools, he trusted that the disinfectant would protect him from whatever menacing bacteria might have found their way into the water. What he didn't know was that the pools' chemical immune system demands careful tending. Mishandling those pool chemicals can make us humans pretty sick!

    According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 5,000 cases of illness and injuries to skin, eyes, and lungs caused by improper handling of swimming pool chemicals are reported in the U.S. annually. Many, many more go unreported. These incidents happen from accidental spills, improper storage, and mixing the wrong chemicals or chemicals that are incompatible.

     

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    A , Internal Medicine, answered
    According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), 5,000 cases of illness and injuries to skin, eyes, and lungs caused by improper handling of swimming pool chemicals are reported in the U.S. annually. Many, many more go unreported. These incidents happen from accidental spills, improper storage, and mixing the wrong chemicals or chemicals that are incompatible.

    Here are some pool maintenance safety tips to help prevent you and your kids from harm:
    • Read every label on every swimming pool chemical and follow - all manufacturers' recommendations precisely.
    • Keep all swimming pool chemicals locked away and out of children's reach.
    • Keep swimming pool chemicals stored at temperatures below 95 degrees Fahrenheit and away from dampness and open flames.
    • Don't store swimming pool chemicals around other garden and household products, such as gasoline, oil, grease, fertilizer, herbicides, paint, or turpentine.
    • When handling swimming pool chemicals, wear protective clothing.
    • Don't mix individual swimming pool chemicals together or with any other substances before putting them in the pool.
    • Add individual swimming pool chemicals to the water. Never add water to the chemicals.

    Now jump in the pool and have some good, clean(ing) fun!

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    A , Alternative & Complementary Medicine, answered
    Right from the get-go, we're born into a toxic world already full of toxins. Shampoo, shaving cream, lip gloss, hand soap, dish detergents, laundry detergents, moisturizing creams, perfumes, air fresheners, cosmetics and deodorants -- in our heart of hearts, we know these useful little additions to our daily lives start out as nasty raw materials, but we just don't like to think about it. Dyes and pigments, rubber, the fabrics that make up our clothing, the paint on our houses, the tube of glue in the kitchen drawer -- we know they started out in places with chimneys belching sulfur oxides, nitrogen oxides, volatile organic compounds, particulate matter, carbon monoxide, sulfuric acid, carbon dioxide and dioxins.
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    You can reduce perchlorate in your drinking water by installing a reverse osmosis filter. As for food, it’s pretty much impossible to avoid perchlorate, but you can reduce its potential effects by making sure you get enough iodine in your diet. Eating iodized salt is one good way.
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    A , Internal Medicine, answered
    Eliminate products made with hormone-disrupting, diabetes-triggering phthalates. The worst offender is dibutyl phthalate, also identified as "butyl ester" or "plasticizer." It's in cosmetics, nail polish, kids' toys, and more. If there isn't an ingredient label telling you it's phthalates-free, pass it by.
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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered
    Granite, a popular rock used to fabricate kitchen countertops, emits radon, a naturally occurring gas that has radioactive properties. Radon is the second most-common cause of lung cancer after smoking. Experts recommend you test your granite countertops and at your home's foundation level to see how much radon is being emitted. Testing only on the countertop could provide a false sense of security since radon gas tends to accumulate at floor level.
    This content originally appeared on doctoroz.com
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    Eighty thousand chemicals have been created since World War II, and of them, 2,800 are high production volume (HPV) chemicals whose production exceeds 1 million pounds a year. Fewer than 20% of these HPV chemicals have been tested for their possible toxicity to children.

    In the absence of federal regulations or guidelines, Dr. Maida Galvez, a pediatrician and the director of the Mount Sinai Pediatric Environmental Health Specialty Unit (PEHSU), and Rhonda Sherwood, vice chairman of the Mount Sinai Children's Environmental Health Center, advise taking a precautionary approach and looking for safer alternatives for untested HPV chemicals.
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    Who needs food tainted with rocket fuel? That’s right, perchlorate, a component in rocket fuel, contaminates much of our produce and milk. When perchlorate gets into your body it competes with the nutrient iodine, which the thyroid gland needs to make thyroid hormones. Basically, this means that if you ingest too much of it you can end up altering your thyroid hormone balance. This is important because it’s these hormones that regulate metabolism in adults and are critical for proper brain and organ development in infants and young children.
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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered

    Ever read the back of a bottle of cleaner? Between the multisyllabic chemicals you can't pronounce and the warnings to keep children and pets away from them, it's no wonder many people wind up in the emergency room when they ignore those warnings. One of the most dangerous mistakes you can make? Accidentally mixing ammonia (found in window cleaner) with chlorine bleach (found in all types of cleaners). The result is chlorine gas, which was an agent of chemical warfare in World War I.

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    It’s virtually impossible to avoid exposure to polybrominated diphenyl ethers, or PBDEs, but passing better toxic chemical laws that require chemicals to be tested before they go on the market would help reduce our exposure. There are a few things that can you can do in the meantime:
    • use a vacuum cleaner with a HEPA filter, which can cut down on toxic-laden house dust
    • avoid reupholstering foam furniture
    • take care when replacing old carpet (the padding underneath may contain PBDEs)
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