Cardiovascular Agent

Cardiovascular Agent

Cardiovascular Agent
Cardiovascular drugs control and treat various heart conditions.

Recently Answered

  • 1 Answer
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    A Cardiac Rehabilitation, answered on behalf of

    Esmolol is an intravenous medication in the class of "beta blockers". Because it is administered via an intravenous line, its effects are almost immediate. It lowers blood pressure and heart rate. An adverse effect can be too much lowering of the heart rate or blood pressure. Since it is metabolized very quickly by red blood cells in the blood stream, turning off the infusion usually results in reversal of the effects of esmolol very quickly, with no other action needed.

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    A , Pharmacy, answered
    No drug interaction studies have been done with the CROFAB (Crotalidae Polyvalent Immune Fab Ovine) antivenin. However, it is likely that CROFAB can interact with morphine and narcotics and that may suppress breathing. CROFAB antivenin also interacts with beta blockers. This class of drugs is used to treat high blood pressure by blocking the actions of a hormone called epinephrine. If you need to receive antivenin, tell your doctor about any medications you currently take.
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    A , Pharmacy, answered
    Isoproterenol is a prescription medicine that can relax the blood vessels or airways, allowing blood or air to flow more freely. The doctor may give you a shot of isoproterenol (Isuprel) if you have problems with your heart, such as irregular heartbeat, heart failure or heart attack, or if you are in shock or have other blood vessel-related problems. In these cases, isoproterenol acts as a sympathomimetic, stimulating your circulation. You may get a shot of isoproterenol if your airway is constricted while you are under anesthesia. This drug is also available in an inhaler or nebulizer form (Isuprel, Isuprel Mistometer, Medihaler-Iso) for people with breathing problems, such as emphysema, bronchitis and asthma. Used in this way, isoproterenol works as a bronchodilator, loosening your airway muscles so you can breathe more easily.

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    A , Pharmacy, answered

    Tell your doctor about any prescription or over-the-counter medications, supplements or vitamins you take because betaxolol can interact with other medicines. Make your doctor aware of any drugs you take that alter mood, such as amitriptyline and phenelzine, or if you use oral beta blockers, including atenolol and propranolol.

    Also, inform your doctor if you use any of the following:

    • certain diabetes drugs (like insulin or sulfonylureas such as glyburide)
    • psychiatric drugs (such as venlafaxine)
    • drugs for high blood pressure (like clonidine, reserpine, calcium channel blockers such as diltiazem)
    • or epinephrine

    The combination of these drugs and betaxolol may increase or decrease effectiveness or increase the risk for certain side effects.

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    A , Emergency Medicine, answered
    Omega-3 fatty acid drugs such as Epanova, Lovaza, Omacor, and Omtryg can reduce triglyceride levels by as much as 45% and very low-density cholesterol by up to 42%. 

    This answer was adapted from Sharecare's award-winning AskMD app. Start a consultation now to find out what's causing your symptoms, learn how to manage a condition, or find a doctor. 

     
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    A , Emergency Medicine, answered
    If you are allergic to fish or shellfish, an omega-3-acid ethyl ester may not be a good option for you.

    If you are pregnant, planning to become pregnant, or may be pregnant, be aware that it is not known if omega-3 acid ethyl esters are safe for pregnant women.

    Omega-3-acid ethyl esters are passed into breast milk and may not be a good option for breastfeeding moms.

    This answer was adapted from Sharecare's award-winning AskMD app. Start a consultation now to find out what's causing your symptoms, learn how to manage a condition, or find a doctor. 
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    A , Emergency Medicine, answered
    Side effects may include burping, indigestion, and abnormal taste. In some people, they increase LDL cholesterol.

    This answer was adapted from Sharecare's award-winning AskMD app. Start a consultation now to find out what's causing your symptoms, learn how to manage a condition, or find a doctor. 
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    A , Allergy & Immunology, answered
    The injectable epinephrine form called Twinject appeals to pediatric allergists for three reasons: (1) the bore of the needle is narrower and less painful to our little patients (or to big ones for that matter); (2) the epinephrine is injected with a much "softer" shot, with an injection pressure of 6 pounds per square inch or psi (compared to EpiPen's 30 psi), making it somewhat more kid friendly; and (3) it has a second dose "behind" the first. It's also a smaller instrument and therefore easier to carry.
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    As with any medication, take antiarrhythmics (heart rhythm medications) exactly as ordered.
    • If you're taking some of these medications, you'll need ongoing monitoring by your healthcare provider.
    • If you're taking an extended-release tablet, be sure to swallow the pill whole -- don't break, chew, or crush it.
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    Antiarrhythmics (heart rhythm medications) control irregular heartbeats -- and maintain a normal heart rate and rhythm. Examples of antiarrhythmics include:
    • amiodarone (Cordarone)
    • disopyramide phosphate (Norpace)
    • dofetilide (Tikosyn)
    • dronedarone (Multaq)
    • flecainide (Tambocor)
    • mexiletine HCl (Mexitil)
    • procainamide (Procan, Pronestyl)
    • propafenone HCl (Rythmol)
    • propafenone HCI SR (Rythmol SR)
    • quinidine gluconate (Quinaglute)
    • sotalol (Betapace, see beta-blockers)
    • tocainide HCl (Tonocard)