Carbon Monoxide Poisoning

Carbon Monoxide Poisoning

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    Keeping your family safe from carbon monoxide poisoning should be a concern. You can do this by making sure your fuel-burning appliances are set up, serviced, and maintained by a trained professional. You should also be mindful of not using these appliances in confined spaces. Keeping carbon monoxide detectors in each room of the house will also give you peace of mind.

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    Carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning can be prevented by ensuring that all fuel-burning appliances are properly connected to external ducting to ensure the removal of carbon monoxide. Care should also be taken to ensure that these appliances are set up and maintained by professionals. Carbon monoxide detectors should be placed throughout the home to alert you to the presence of the gas.

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    A , Health Education, answered
    Carbon monoxide (CO) is a deadly gas that is difficult to detect because it is odorless and invisible. As a result, it is known as “the silent killer.” According to the U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission (CPSC), this poisonous gas kills nearly 300 people in their homes each year.

    CO is produced by fuel-burning appliances and equipment in our homes. If you have heating, cooking or power equipment that uses fuels such as oil, natural gas, coal, wood, propane, gasoline, etc., then your home is at risk for potential CO poisoning. Homes with attached garages are also at risk, because vehicles left running in the garage can cause CO to seep into the home.

    Symptoms of CO poisoning are similar to symptoms of the flu, and can include headache, dizziness, nausea and shortness of breath. To distinguish between symptoms of flu and CO poisoning, if you feel better after leaving home and then worse again when you return, it may be CO exposure causing the symptoms.
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    Unborn children can be especially at risk for carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning even though it can take longer for the CO to reach dangerous levels in the fetus than the mother. If the mother loses consciousness while being exposed to CO, the fetus can be most at risk and may experience either short- or long-term problems. However, if the CO poisoning is mild and the mother is treated, there are usually no direct effects on the fetus.

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    Young children are one of the populations at high risk for carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning. However, keeping children safe from CO poisoning is fairly simple. Be sure all fuel-burning appliances are properly installed and serviced. Use CO detectors in every room of your house. If you believe your child has been poisoned by CO, move the child to fresh air immediately and seek medical attention.

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    A , Pharmacy, answered
    Burning charcoal produces carbon monoxide, a colorless, odorless gas that can quickly build to dangerous levels. Breathing in carbon monoxide fumes can lead to carbon monoxide poisoning, which can be quite harmful -- even fatal. Each year, many people get carbon monoxide poisoning from burning charcoal in a closed space. You should only burn charcoal in an open, outdoor space -- never in a closed, indoor area such as your house or garage, a camper, a tent, a vehicle or a mobile home.
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    A answered

    A deadly gas that you can’t see or smell is carbon monoxide (CO), but could be floating around your home. Research reveals that carbon monoxide poisoning remains a far too common cause of illness and death, especially among kids.

    Carbon monoxide poisons more than 2,110 children age 5 and younger each year. While everyone is at risk for this poison, infants and children are at the greatest risk because they use the most oxygen. The initial symptoms of carbon monoxide poisoning -- headache, nausea, dizziness, chest pain -- mimic other illnesses, so it’s difficult to diagnose. Sleeping children can become ill before ever complaining of symptoms. Keep your family alerted of potential problems by installing inexpensive CO sensors on every level and in every bedroom of your home and testing them regularly.

    Create a plan of action for your kids to follow if the alarm does goes off. Stress the importance of leaving the house immediately, and map out a meeting place outdoors where you can breathe fresh air. Do not call for help until you’ve left the building.

    From Good Kids, Bad Habits: The RealAge Guide to Raising Healthy Children by Jennifer Trachtenberg.

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    A , Pharmacy, answered
    You can tell if you have carbon monoxide in your home by installing a carbon monoxide alarm, as recommended by the Centers for Disease Control. The alarm will go off if carbon monoxide is present. Carbon monoxide alarms also should be used in mobile homes and campers and other recreational vehicles.

    It is also recommended that all fuel-burning appliances such as heaters, furnaces and stoves be professionally inspected. These preventative measures will help detect any carbon monoxide that is in the air and may allow you to fix any leaks before the carbon monoxide reaches dangerous levels.
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    Yes, carbon monoxide (CO) is a poisonous gas. CO is produced anytime something is burned. It is one of the leading causes of death in fires. When a person breathes CO, the gas prevents the blood cells from carrying oxygen to the body. Symptoms are caused by poor oxygenation, which often affects the neurologic system (brain and spinal cord) first. There is often confusion, lightheadedness, weakness, reddened skin, and even loss of consciousness or death if the exposure is too strong or too long.
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    All carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning treatment involves the introduction of oxygen to the affected person. While open air may be effective in treating very mild cases, hyperbaric oxygen treatment may be needed for more severe instances. Such treatment will generally be administered via a breathing mask, and an overnight hospital stay may be required.