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What does a neurologist do?

Neurologists treat headaches, strokes, brain tumors and various other conditions.

A neurologist is a specially-trained physician that knows all about the brain. Watch Carrie Stafstrom, director of orthopedics and neuroscience at Los Robles Hospital & Medical Center, explain the types of disorders they treat.

Dr. Nicholas D Suite
Neurologist

A neurologist is a medical doctor who looks after patients with problems involving the brain, spinal cord, nerves, and muscles. A neurologist will evaluate and care for individuals complaining of headaches, certain kinds of pain, memory loss, muscle weakness, seizures, head injuries, movement and balance disorders, among many other things.

A neurologist is a physician who is specializing in the diagnosis and treatment of disorders of the nervous system. After completing medical school a neurologist will complete 1 to 3 years of training in Internal Medicine (or pediatrics if he is to become a pediatric neurologist). He will then complete a 3 year residency in neurology. Some will get additional training (fellowship) in certain specific areas of neurology (e.g. epilepsy, muscle disorders, movement disorders, etc.).

Common disorders that a neurologist may deal with include epilepsy, headaches, multiple sclerosis, Parkinson’s disease, nerve/muscle problems, memory/thinking problems, and brain tumors. Problems involving the nervous system that involve abnormal behavior may benefit from seeing a neurologist, but these problems are generally dealt with by a psychiatrist.

A typical visit to the neurologist would involve taking a detailed history of your problem. This would be followed with a detailed physical exam, focusing on the nervous system. Often times the neurologist may be involved in the ordering, performance and interpretation of such things as MRI brain scans, electroencephalograms, electromyograms/nerve conduction studies, and other diagnostic studies.

After this process results in a diagnosis, the neurologist would then initiate and provide continuing nonsurgical care for the problem/condition that has been identified.

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Important: This content reflects information from various individuals and organizations and may offer alternative or opposing points of view. It should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. As always, you should consult with your healthcare provider about your specific health needs.