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Is there any treatment for stiff-person syndrome?

People with stiff-person syndrome (SPS) respond to high doses of diazepam and several anti-convulsants, gabapentin and tiagabine. A recent study funded by the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS) demonstrated the effectiveness of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) treatment in reducing stiffness and lowering sensitivity to noise, touch, and stress in people with SPS.

This information is based on source information from the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke.

Treatment of stiff person's syndrome is focused on reducing muscle spasms and rigidity.

Oral medication, which relax the muscles such as diazepam and baclofen, and anti-seizure medications may all be helpful in reducing muscle spasms. 

More recently, intravenous immungobulin (IVIG) has also been shown to be helpful as has botulinum toxin (Botox) injected into the affected muscles.

In more severe cases, intrathecal baclofen (baclofen administered directly into the spinal fluid via a pump) has also been shown to be effective.  

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