Beauty and Personal Care

Beauty and Personal Care

Beauty and Personal Care
Taking care of your personal appearance is an important part of maintaining your overall health and self esteem. Many of the products that help in daily care of your hair, skin, and teeth can also have long-term benefits. Learn more about beauty and personal care from our experts.

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    A , Dermatology, answered
    Regularly apply a moisturizing lip treatment that contains an SPF ingredient to protect from sun damage. Select a product that has emollients to soften lips and soothe chapped skin and dryness. We recommend the emollients qualane, carnauba wax, petrolatum, and silicone in lip products.
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    Natural fragrances are not necessarily safer than synthetic ones. Product safety depends on the source of the individual ingredients. It’s important to realize that "natural" does not necessarily mean safe. In many cases, very little is known about potentially harmful effects of an ingredient, even if it can be found in nature. It may be helpful to look for natural fragrances from manufacturers that disclose all of the components in their products.
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    Multi-purpose oils can be effective moisturizers. Plant oils, which have a presence in many beauty products, are primarily composed of glycerol and fatty acids. Each oil has a different number of carbons in its fatty acid structure, and the number affects how the oil gets absorbed by and stays on the skin or hair. For example, olive and jojoba oils work well on the skin because they have long chain molecules that stay close to the skin’s surface. Perry Romanowski, a cosmetic chemist in Chicago, told us that longer chain molecules moisturize the skin better than shorter chain materials that get absorbed into the lower levels of the skin. For the hair, coconut oil offers the best of absorption and hydration. It’s primarily made up of 12-carbon fatty acids that penetrate the cuticle and give hair strength, too.
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    Similar to salves or balms, you can use multi-purpose oils anywhere you need moisturization. Unlike products that are only for the face or hands or feet, these oils don’t have boundaries -- and they can even work on hair. Just make sure to follow the instructions and not use too much (a little goes a long way).

    Multi-purpose oils are typically marketed for all types of skin or hair, but they may not be for everyone. If you have acne or eczema, consult your dermatologist before using them.

    For those with sensitive skin, perform a test before you begin using a product, especially if the product contains essential oils, fragrances or questionable ingredients, particularly if it’s made for the hair.
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    It is possible to find harmful ingredients in personal care products. Some companies continue to use ingredients that have been strongly linked to cancer risks, or that are associated with developmental problems.

    Plus, many cosmetics ingredients penetrate the skin. People ingest those used on lips and hands and inhale sprays and powders. When dangerous or unstudied chemicals are used in cosmetics, the risks are higher.
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    Karl Malden, he of the protruding proboscis, used to warn that one should never leave home without one's American Express card.

    Women know better. A survey by the Ultima II cosmetics company showed that women over age 45 said lipstick is the one thing, well beauty item anyway, they could not leave home without.

    So nobody is arguing its importance.

    But there is debate on how best to apply lipstick.

    Unlike one's hips, belly and butt, lips do thin out over time. So some professional cosmetologists feel one should slather on a layer of lip liner before applying lipstick, for a little more definition. Others say humbug, lip liner is not only superfluous, and will make you spend money you don't need to spend, but it will actually add a harsh line that will highlight the thinning nature of your lips.

    Lip liner or no lip liner, rethink what you are putting on your lips. Lip glosses may go slip sliding around your lips now that they are thinner. And those dark colors you liked so much back in the day? Think lighter. Just a few shades will make all the difference in the world.
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    A , Emergency Medicine, answered
    As I’m writing this, I’m doing a mental inventory of what I need to check in my OWN makeup drawer!
     
    While makeup doesn’t usually have a set expiration date, there are periods of time after which either the consistency could change, the color could become altered or it could be at greater risk of spreading infection. Toss anything that has a color change or smells funny, and stick to these rules of thumb:
    • Foundation – Keep liquids for 6 months to 1 year, powders for 2 years. Keeping them longer than that may lead to increased bacteria, as well as consistency changes.
    • Mascara and liquid eyeliner – Discard after 3 months. I know that doesn’t sound long, but it is going on your eyes!
    • Lipstick and liner – These can hold up better over time. Glosses and lipstick are good for 1-2 years, lipliner for 2 years or more.
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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered
    When you're a busy woman, it's easy to get stuck in a style rut. You let your beauty routines lapse and reach for what's comfortable and easy instead of what makes you feel sexy or beautiful. Reclaim your confidence by throwing out your sweats and starting your mornings with a little me-time: Do your hair and makeup, and get dressed in clothes that make you feel good about yourself! Let your good mood be the motivation you need to work out and take care of yourself.
    This content originally appeared on doctoroz.com
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    Even plant-based ingredients can be harmful -- poison ivy, for example -- and should meet the same safety standards as those derived from petroleum, mines or animals. It can be hard to tell which ingredients are truly "organic" or "natural" because truth-in-marketing rules for food don't apply to cosmetics. There is one exception - products bearing the USDA organic seal contain ingredients that come from plants grown without artificial pesticides and fertilizers.