Beauty & Culture

Beauty & Culture

Beauty & Culture
While people and cultures have different ideas of beauty, many women look to celebrities, fashion ads and online for cues on how to wear their hair and makeup, how to dress and how much they should weigh. Many women are influenced by how skinny a celebrity appears. But trying to look younger, more attractive or thinner by your culture's standards doesn't necessarily make you healthier. Find out more about the influence of media and culture on beauty with expert advice from Sharecare.

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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered
    We've all heard the adage "Beauty is in the eye of the beholder." It means that just as we all have different taste buds, we all have different beauty buds, as well. Some of us may like blond hair; others like brown. Some like their men to wear boxers; others prefer leopard-print G-strings. And we've all also heard "Don't judge a book by its cover." You know, don't make assumptions or judgments about people just because they may have big boobs, no hair, or a belt that's longer than a circus tightrope.

    I hope it doesn't come as too much of a shock: Both of these sayings are much more myth than fact. Beauty is, in fact, quite objective and measurable. Trends and small changes in preferences come and go, but core aspects have remained the same throughout the world and throughout history. In fact, research shows that human beings have evolved universal standards of beauty, both within and across cultures. Hint: Much depends on the symmetry of our facial features, our waist-to-hip ratio, a mathematical principle called the Fibonacci sequence, and some other choice factors.

    You might not consciously know how these particular details make beauty quantifiable, but your brain sure knows them when it sees them. When we spot a particularly attractive person, somewhere deep in our reptilian brains, a beauty alarm goes off. It tells us when we've struck gold, and it does so automatically and subconsciously. Just like a reflex, it's impossible to stop—and it's Annie Oakley accurate. Your beauty detectors have the mathematical precision of a Swiss watch, and they're rarely wrong. That's why outer beauty is nothing to take lightly. The good news? You can influence it to a large extent.

    So you can also forget the adage "You can't turn a sow's ear into a silk purse." You're already beautiful. You wouldn't be here unless your ancestors were beautiful. You need to accept the fact that we're all beautiful; sexual selection guaranteed it because your ancestors mated with the most beautiful partners. We all have beautiful elements in us. You just need to use the right strategies to maximize them.
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    A , Psychology, answered
    The next time that you find yourself judging someone who struggles with their weight, consider the following:

    We all engage in unhealthy coping behaviors sometimes: We might text while driving. We might smoke cigarettes. We might “forget” to put on sunscreen at the beach. Overeating just happens to be one unhealthy behavior that has visible consequences. Overweight individuals have a whole array of strengths and weaknesses just like the rest of us; their bodies do not connote anything about who they are as a whole and complete person.

    Many overweight people are desperately trying to improve their health: Changing long-standing nutrition and physical activity patterns is no easy task. For many obese individuals, punishing diet programs are all too familiar. Most could write their own books on diet and exercise because they have tried virtually everything on the market. That overweight lady on a scooter may very well be fully engaged in the weight-loss process. For all you know, she may have already lost 60 pounds and is only just now able to even fit into the scooter. Weight loss is a slow and effortful process. You cannot make assumptions about efforts in self-care just by looking at someone.

    The majority of obese individuals experience some level of physical and emotional pain every day of their lives: Imagine not being able to stand up from a chair without shooting pains through your legs. Picture yourself sitting through a movie with the arms of the chair digging into your sides. Envision yourself being pointed at by small children who ask their mothers, saying “Why is that man so fat?” Being an overweight person in our culture presents physical and emotional challenges on a daily basis. Don’t be yet another source of pain.
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    A , Plastic Surgery, answered
    A small chin is commonly called a weak chin -- and that says it all. The impression is of a weak personality. A strong chin, particularly in a man, is associated with strength and leadership. Chin implants can be placed onto the bone, changing a weak chin into a more powerful, domineering chin. In men, the change increases the image of masculinity. In women, chin implants balance the face. In both sexes, however, a weak chin makes a large nose seem even larger.
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    A , Plastic Surgery, answered
    How you look alters others’ perceptions of you. Like it or not, more attractive people have a lot of advantages in life. According to David Sarwer, PhD, a psychologist at the University of Pennsylvania, "Studies have shown that both men and women who are physically attractive have more friends, better educational opportunities, better job offers, and even better medical care." Attractive people are more successful in life because other people prefer to deal with them.
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    A , Plastic Surgery, answered
    Wearing the correct fit bra can help maintain the shape of your breast and reduce skin and tissue laxity. After performing thousands of breast surgeries, my patients had great difficulty finding the correct fit bra. I personally looked at all the flaws and problems with the great number of sports bras available and created the DrLinderBra-tm. Features include: Bi-directional stretch, 95% cotton with 5% spandex to allow comfort and support, side-adjustible straps with reinforced clips to bring waistline in or out up to 1 and a half inches (pregnancy, post-operative swelling, and menstrual cycle), reinforced #3 United States made zipper with frontal padding to prevent irritation. This bra is fit by Chest wall diameter (32 A and 32 C both wear same Small bra) not by specific Cup size. My patients are instructed to always wear this type of bra to sleep as well to prevent gravitational descent of the breasts.
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    A , Alternative & Complementary Medicine, answered
    I wear panty hose only when I want to. I buy fewer pairs, and when I do, I’m not paying that higher plus-size price. I can get them from a dollar store. I don’t, but I could! Typically, when a large woman wants to dress well, she has to spend more money on her wardrobe than a small woman does. Plus-size clothes cost more. Skinny people can wear just about anything and look okay, and even look chic in inexpensive things. I don’t think every woman can wear everything and look good in it. Not even skinny people. Leggings, spandex - need I say more?
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    Inner beauty comes from accepting yourself for who you really are and loving that person. If you are having trouble accepting and seeing your inner beauty there are some excellent self-help books that can give you the tools to work on seeing your inner beauty. Another strategy may be to talk to a counselor who specializes in self-esteem and inner beauty. There is no easy trick to seeing yourself and loving what you see, it takes time and experience to see the unique gifts you offer to the world.
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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered
    Innies vs outies
    It has often been thought that "innie" belly buttons were healthier than "outies." In this video, Dr. Oz reveals if one is really healthier than the other.



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    A , Preventive Medicine, answered
    Our current culture is awash in mixed messages about the body. While our Puritan heritage viewed the naked body as shameful or deviant, popular magazines, advertisements, television and movies bombard us with gratuitous nudity and hypersexuality. We live in a Barbie-doll culture where expectations are confusing and ambivalent. Unrealistic body images result in an epidemic of eating disorders and sexual confusion. As a result of this cultural onslaught, many of us live in a constant state of anxiety and obsession with the next great diet, miracle drug, exercise machine, or diet guru.
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    A , Internal Medicine, answered

    About 90 percent of us are wearing the wrong jeans for our body type. Wrong jeans and bad fit equals an unattractive look. You should expect to try on at least a dozen pair of jeans (and even alter the ones you choose). What you're trying to avoid: jeans that appear cellophane-tight or jeans that have too much room, which makes it appear that you have more body squeezed in there than you actually do (look for bumps or creases in the crotch area at the rise to the waist). Get boot cut if you're tall and straight leg if you're short, and a dark wash can make you look thinner, since a stone wash can put a spotlight onto your thighs.