Aspirin

Aspirin

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  • 1 Answer
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    A Allergy & Immunology, answered on behalf of
    What are the side effects of aspirin desensitization treatment?
    Side effects for those undergoing aspirin desensitization are similar to ones caused by taking low-dose aspirin. Watch Tanya Laidlaw, MD, of Brighman and Women's Hospital, describe which side effects may increase for those taking higher doses.
  • 1 Answer
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    A , Emergency Medicine, answered
    Low-dose aspirin reduces the rate of strokes and heart attacks by 25% or more. A higher dose does not increase this effect. 

    This answer was adapted from Sharecare's award-winning AskMD app. Start a consultation now to find out what's causing your symptoms, learn how to manage a condition, or find a doctor.
  • 2 Answers
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    Before beginning treatment with low-dose aspirin, you should know that low-dose aspirin has been shown to be effective in lowering the risk of heart attacks and certain types of strokes in people at high risk for these events. It may also lower the risk of colon cancer slightly. However, even low-dose aspirin is not without side effects and risks. The biggest risk is that of bleeding more easily and for a longer time. While this is not usually a problem, it can lead to serious gastroentestinal bleeding and/or hemorrhagic (bleeding) strokes, both of which can be very debilitating or deadly. Therefore, the decision to start taking aspirin should be made with a healthcare provider.
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    Using low-dose aspirin (100 mg. every other day) can reduce the risk of stroke in women, and reduce the risk of heart attack and cardiac death in women age 65 years and older. Aspirin does not appear to have the same protective effect to prevent first heart attacks or cardiac deaths in women under age 65. However, the use of aspirin therapy can reduce the risk of second heart attack or stroke in women. Because there are certain risks associated with taking aspirin regularly, you should speak with your doctor first.
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    Low-dose aspirin in not currently recommend to treat high blood pressure. However, low-dose aspirin is used to prevent some of the complications that can go with high blood pressure. The decision to start taking aspirin should be made with a healthcare provider.
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    Antiplatelet medications are a class of medications that help to prevent platelets (a type of blood cell) from forming a blood clot that could cause a heart attack. Aspirin is an inexpensive and effective type of antiplatelet agent that is frequently used to prevent coronary heart disease (CHD). 

    Aspirin is sometimes recommended for people who have no signs of CHD or other cardiovascular disease but have one or more risk factors for a heart attack. 

    Daily aspirin (75-162 mg daily) is routinely prescribed and highly recommended for men at “intermediate” risk (10 year risk of CHD > 10%). Daily aspirin (75-162 mg) is also often utilized for women with a 10 year risk of CHD > 10%. Aspirin is usually not used to prevent heart attack in a woman with less than a 10% 10 year risk of heart attack unless she has multiple cardiac risk factors and is postmenopausal. Aspirin is sometimes recommended in women < 65 years of age for ischemic stroke prevention.

    However, it's important to talk to your doctor before taking aspirin for this reason.

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    A , Internal Medicine, answered
    Though we don't know how aspirin decreases cancer risk, we know that it does. Taking half of an aspirin a day can decrease the risk of getting colon cancer, breast cancer, and prostate cancer by 40 percent. It's been shown to slightly-very slightly-increase the risk of pancreatic cancer from 2 incidents of every 100,000 people to 4 incidents per 100,000.

    Those benefits do not include its ability to prevent or reverse arterial aging. Just taking that half of a regular aspirin (or two baby aspirins) can make the RealAge of a 55-year-old 2.2 years younger. Take aspirin with a glass of warm water: It'll help dissolve the aspirin faster and decrease the risk of gastric side effects that occur when the aspirin lands directly on the stomach lining.
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    A , Pediatrics, answered

    Hello, the health benefits of omega-3 supplements are suggested but not absolutely clear and are mainly in heart health. Aspirin therapy may be helpful for some persons who are at risk for heart attack and/or stroke. While these may be safely taken together, only your treating physician can tell you whether your risk factors and lifestyle make you a good candidate for taking aspirin. No mega-doses of supplements including omega-3's are ever recommended.

  • 3 Answers
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    A , Internal Medicine, answered

    Aspirin reduces a lot of bad things. If it were patentable, it would be even more popular than either Brad or Beyonce. It reduces body-wide inflammation, decreasing the risk of heart disease, stroke, wrinkles, and impotence, and lowers cancer risk. It’s as close to a miracle drug for under three dollars a year.

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    A , Internal Medicine, answered
    One of the greatest things you can do for your health takes literally a half second. If that's not incentive, I don't know what is. A half second a day can translate into extra years of life. Taking 162 milligrams of aspirin a day (that's two baby aspirins or half a regular, taken with a half glass of warm water before and after) can decrease the risk of getting colon cancer, esophageal cancer, prostate cancer, ovarian cancer, and breast cancer—all by 40 percent. And it probably decreases the risk of stomach, throat, and several other cancers as well.

    Aspirin provides this through the reduction of inflammation throughout the body, although other cell repair mechanisms may be active as well. I know aspirin has side effects, but the benefits—a younger arterial system and a decreased risk of at least four big cancers—often outweigh the risks. So discuss with your doc whether it's worth it to you.
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