Artificial Sweeteners

Artificial Sweeteners

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  • 1 Answer
    A
    The chart below lists the brand names seen in stores for each artificial sweetener:
    • Acesulfame Potassium - Sunnett, Sweet One
    • Aspartame - Nutrasweet, Equal
    • Neotame - N/A
    • Saccharin - Sweet 'N Low, Sweet Twin, Sugar Twin
    • Sucralose - Splenda
    • Stevia/Rebaudioside - A Sweet Leaf, Sun Crystals, Steviva, Truvia, PureVia
  • 2 Answers
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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered
    Artificial sweeteners are frequently found in many reduced-calorie foods, processed products and diet or decaffeinated drinks. They contain chemical compounds called sucralose, aspartame and cyclamate that the digestive tract cannot break down easily, which can lead to bloating. Sweeteners, which can be up to 300 times sweeter than natural sugar, are known to increase appetite and result in overeating.

    This content originally appeared on doctoroz.com.
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  • 1 Answer
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    A , Addiction Medicine, answered
    How can I reset my sense of taste after giving up artificial sweeteners?

    After giving up artificial sweeteners, it is possible to recalibrate your taste buds if you gradually move towards more sour foods. Watch as psychotherapist Mike Dow, PsyD, explains how you can reset your sense of taste and how long it will take.


  • 2 Answers
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    A , Fitness, answered
    Aspartame was discovered by a chemist; you probably know it as Equal and NutraSweet. It’s found in thousands of food and drink products -- namely, diet sodas. Studies have shown that it can cause imbalances in your brain; aggravate migraines and affect your nervous system, your moods and even your quality of sleep. A study published in Environmental Health Perspectives found a connection between aspartame consumption and seizures. Additionally, researchers from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis questioned the rise in malignant brain tumors during the years after aspartame was introduced.
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  • 1 Answer
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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered
    Beyond the commonly used serving packets, artificial sweeteners are often hidden in everyday items not advertised as diet foods such as cereal, vitamins, sauces and even baby food. Look for these key words on food labels to spot artificial substitutes:
    • Saccharin
    • Aspartame
    • Sucralose
    • Neotame (used in stable baked goods)
    • Acesulfame (found in diet sodas)
    This content originally appeared on doctoroz.com.
  • 1 Answer
    A
    The low-calorie sweeteners in use in the United States all underwent extensive testing before they were approved. Results showed that low-calorie sweeteners are safe for everyone, including children and pregnant women. However, people with a rare condition called phenylketonuria (PKU) should limit their intake of aspartame, one type of low-calorie sweetener.
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    A , Naturopathic Medicine, answered
    Saccharin is a known cancer-causing compound in rats. Although these effects have not been noted in humans, it must be pointed out that saccharin has been shown to cause cancer in rats only if it is administered over two generations. Therefore, it might be that future generations may pay for the current consumption of saccharin. This effect on future generations may finally provide the firm evidence the American Medical Association's Council on Scientific Affairs requires. This council has concluded that "until there is firm evidence of its [saccharin's] carcinogenicity in humans, saccharin should continue to be available as a food additive."

    Aspartame is composed of aspartic acid, phenylalanine, and methanol. Aspartame was approved for food use by the FDA in 1981, despite the final recommendation of the FDA Advisory Panel on aspartame that no approval be granted until safety issues could be resolved. Richard Wurtman, M.D., the pioneer in the study of nutrition and the brain, cautioned the FDA that, based on his extensive research, aspartame could significantly affect mood and behavior.

    Wurtman and other researchers have demonstrated that aspartame administration to animals, at levels comparable to those of high human consumption, alters brain chemistry. While the long-term effects of aspartame are largely unknown, some people are quite sensitive to aspartame and report immediate reactions. Some of the problems associated with aspartame ingestion include seizures, migraine headaches, hives, and disturbances in nerve function. Aspartame is particularly problematic for some individuals who suffer from migraine headaches.

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  • 1 Answer
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    A , Nutrition & Dietetics, answered
    When it comes to assessing the benefits/potential risks of agave syrup there are two key issues to explore: 1) quality of product, 2) quantity consumed.

    First, quality of product is critical to explore because, as with any manufactured product, there is the potential for contaminants, and intentionally added ingredients which would jeopardize the quality of the end product thereby potentially creating health risks.

    Second, the issue of quantity with any food is significant, but it seems to be the key piece with sweeteners and their negative impact on one's health. The core difference between sugar and agave, is a higher content of fructose (commonly known as "fruit sugar"). A higher fructose content helps lower the glycemic index of agave nectar versus table sugar. A lower glycemic index (GI) is good, right? Well, yes and no; and here we return to the issue of quantity. High amounts of fructose have been shown to increase triglycerides (a part of blood cholesterol) in individuals with insulin resistance, and it may also be implicated in non-alcohol fatty liver disease. High amounts of glucose are implicated in insulin resistance, obesity, heart disease and challenging the immune system. From where I stand, neither one of these then sounds all that great, right? And yet, there is no evidence that small amounts of glucose or small amounts of fructose present these risks.

    One other food development issue may tip the balance in favor of agave and that is that it is sweeter than sugar so we are able to achieve a higher sweetness profile using less. So that nets us out at small amounts of agave syrup which is lower GI than table sugar is not a health risk, and indeed may be better for many.
  • 1 Answer
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    You should know that some of these artificial sweeteners have a bitter aftertaste. It varies from person to person, but some people are sensitive to this bitterness and do not tolerate certain sweeteners very well. This means you may have to try a few before finding one that you like, or you may not even notice a difference.

    When you buy artificial sweeteners in the store as table top sweeteners, you can get them in large packages or as individual packets. You have probably seen some of the name brands like Splenda, Sweet 'N Low, or Equal. Many stores also carry generic brands which tend to cost less.

    In order to make these table top sweeteners look similar to sugar, additional ingredients are added to the pure sweeteners for texture and volume. These ingredients (some common ones are dextrose and maltodextrin) will also add a small amount of calories and carbohydrate to the product.
  • 1 Answer
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    There is a whole range of food and drinks in the store that carry these labels:
    • "sugar-free"
    • "reduced sugar"
    • "light"
    • "no sugar added"
    When you remove some or all of the sugar from these products, artificial sweeteners are often added instead to keep the sweet taste. When you see these claims on packages, remember that they do not mean the food is completely carbohydrate-free. These foods may or may not be lower in carbohydrate than the original product. There are also many products now that say they are sweetened with sucralose (Splenda). This also does not mean they have zero carbohydrates. They are probably lower in calories, but they still contain carbs.

    While the amount of sugar in these foods may be lower, remember that sugar is only one form of carbohydrate (they may also contain starch, fiber, and/or sugar alcohols). For this reason, keep in mind the general rule: always check the Nutrition Facts Label for the total carbohydrate content.