Artificial Sweeteners

Artificial Sweeteners

Recently Answered

  • 2 Answers
    A
    A , Internal Medicine, answered
    Dr. Keri Peterson - What are the harmful effects of artificial sweeteners?

    If you've heard rumors that artificial sweeteners are harmful to health, worry no more. In this video, internal medicine specialist Dr. Keri Peterson explains why sugar subs don't deserve such a bad rap.


    See All 2 Answers
  • 3 Answers
    A
    The metabolism of aspartame and the proposed toxicities from these metabolites have concerned many people and have been the emphasis of various postmarketing surveillance studies.

    Aspartame is metabolized by digestive esterases and peptides to three common dietary components: amino acids, aspartic acid and phenylalanine. (Minute amounts of methanol can also be detected.) Eating foods such as meat, milk, fruits and vegetables will also produce these same components, but in greater amounts than aspartame. For example, a glass of milk has six times more phenylalanine and 13 times more aspartic acid, and a glass of tomato juice provides six times more methanol than a beverage the same size sweetened with 100% aspartame. Interestingly enough, it is impossible for humans to digest enough aspartame to raise the levels of these metabolic components to a dangerous level. 
    See All 3 Answers
  • 1 Answer
    A
    A , Fitness, answered
    Saccharin is the oldest sugar substitute around; you probably know it as Sweet ’N Low. It was discovered by a chemist in 1879 and became a popular additive in the 20th century. As early as 1911, though, there was already an effort being made to ban it due to its potentially unhealthy effects. Controversy continued to follow saccharin, especially in the 1970s when research published in Science linked it to bladder cancer in animals. Again, there was an attempt to have it banned, but instead, products were required by law to post a label stating that saccharin caused cancer in laboratory animals (you probably remember seeing it on the side of popular sodas like Tab).

    Even though this ban has since been removed, scientists from institutions such as the University of Illinois and Boston University have requested that saccharin be labeled a carcinogen once again, stating that there is “ample evidence” to suggest that it’s cancer causing.

  • 1 Answer
    A
    In order to make table top artificial sweeteners look similar to sugar, additional ingredients are added to the pure sweeteners for texture and volume. These ingredients (some common ones are dextrose and maltodextrin) will also add a small amount of calories and carbohydrate to the product.

    Food products are considered "no-calorie" if they have 5 calories or less per serving. Notice that even though the nutrition labels on sweetener packets claim to have zero calories and carbohydrate, there are a small amount calories and carbs from those added ingredients. When you use a large amount of these products, it can start to add up. As with all foods, it is important not to go overboard.
  • 1 Answer
    A
    All of the artificial sweeteners (sugar substitutes) approved for use in the United States by the FDA except saccharin are safe in limited amounts during pregnancy. Saccharin, which is not commonly used, should NOT be used during pregnancy. Limiting sodas, both “diet” and regular, during pregnancy is a good idea.
  • 1 Answer
    A
    A , Psychology, answered
    At the end of the day, it is not just about substituting one sweet thing with another, but figuring out what the sweets are doing for us. The fact is, we aren’t addressing the cravings if we just find a calorically trimmed down version of them, such as artificial sweeteners. We aren’t addressing the psychological ends being filled by the sugary means. Sadly, because they sometimes have “fewer” calories we often consume more than we intended and may consume these chemical-laden foods than other, healthier foods.

    A good weight management program should consist of more than just trimmed down versions of your favorites; it should have real foods -- such as fruits and vegetables. When calories count, consuming empty ones doesn’t make good sense.
  • 2 Answers
    A
    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered
    What are some healthy sweeteners?
    Some healthy sweetener options that come straight from nature include coconut nectar and raw honey. In this video, cardiologist Alejandro Junger, MD, discusses the healthy benefits of these natural sweeteners, for those who crave the taste.
    See All 2 Answers
  • 1 Answer
    A
    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered
    According to US Department of Agriculture’s NHANES surveys and the Nielsen Homescan survey, up to 30% of Americans consume diet drinks and other products that contain sugar substitutes. Sugar substitutes are added to nearly 6,000 products sold in the United States, including baby foods, frozen dinners, and even yogurts. Examine the health risks linked to artificial sweeteners. They're not always the healthier option.

    Sucralose (includes Splenda brand): It is 500 times sweeter than sucrose, stored in body fats and does not affect blood sugar levels. Its use is too new to know the long-term effects, but it appears the most promising and is the best one for cooking.

    Aspartame (includes Equal, Nutrasweet brands): Several studies have found it has adverse health effects. This sweetener stays in your body longest, and it cannot be heated -- or it turns into formaldehyde.

    Saccharin (includes Sweet'N Low brand): The research is mixed on its safety. 

    This content originally appeared on doctoroz.com
  • 1 Answer
    A
    Low-calorie sweeteners, formerly called artificial sweeteners or sugar substitutes, have very few or no calories. You'll see them in sugar-free products such as soda and desserts. Some of these sweeteners can be used in cooking or baking; others are added to foods and beverages after cooking. Some manufactured products use a combination of low-calorie sweeteners to get the best flavor.
  • 1 Answer
    A
    Artificial sweeteners give you the sweet taste of sugar without its calories and without raising your blood glucose levels. Depending on the brand used, one packet will usually give the same sweetness as two teaspoons of table sugar.

    There are two classes of artificial sweeteners: noncaloric (non-nutritive) and caloric (nutritive).

    Non-caloric sweeteners, such as aspartame, acesulfame-K, sucralose, and saccharin, do not raise blood glucose.

    Caloric sweeteners, such as sorbitol, mannitol, and xylitol, are sugar alcohols. They have calories and are absorbed into the blood, although more slowly.

    Artificial sweeteners are okay for everyone, except that pregnant or breastfeeding women should not use saccharin and people with phenylketonuria should not use aspartame.