Aromatherapy

Aromatherapy

Aromatherapy

Aromatherapy uses scents to soothe your body, which may help relieve nausea, pain and stress.

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    A , Midwifery Nursing, answered

    Aromatherapy is one homeopathic remedy that has been demonstrated to help with insomnia. Adding essential oils to either your warm bath water before bed or in a room diffuser followed by a massage of your back, sholders and feet may be just what the midwife ordered. Scents you may find helpful include Lavender, Yling Ylang, and Geranium.

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    A , Healthcare, answered
    In Egypt, aromatherapy was used more than 3,000 years ago to cure illness. Ancient Egyptians also used aromatic plants and oils for massage, embalming, and cosmetics. The most famous Egyptian fragrance, kyphi (the name means "welcome to the gods"), was said to induce hypnotic states.

    There are biblical records of herbal use in the Middle East more than 2,000 years ago, particularly the fragrant herbs myrrh and frankincense. Accounts are written of the ancient Hebrews using aromatherapy fragrances to consecrate their temples, altars, and priests. In fact, the book of Exodus in the Old Testament of the Bible gives the recipe for the holy anointing oil given to Moses for the initiation of priests:  a blend of myrrh, cinnamon and calamus, mixed with olive oil.

    Aromatherapy was commonly used in Greece. Before going to battle, Greek warriors anointed themselves with oils, and by the 7th century BC, hundreds of perfumers set up shops in the mercantile center of Athens. Aromatherapy was used in early Rome, where clients would be massaged with oil after taking a bath.

    During the Middle Ages in Europe, such plants as cypress, clove, and rosemary were burned to help control the plague. The use of aromatherapy moved to the Far East, and in China upper classes made lavish use of fragrance. Some of the most commonly used aromas were jasmine, which was used as a general tonic, rose to improve digestion, chamomile to reduce headaches and colds, and ginger to fight coughs and treat malaria.

    Even though incense didn't arrive in Japan until around 500 AD, the Japanese turned the use of incense into a fine art, having perfected a distillation process. Incense was burned for ceremonial purposes and students performed story dances for incense-burning rituals.

    On the other side of the world, the Aztecs used aromas and essence for medicinal purposes, massaging injured warriors with scented salves in the sweat lodges. Massage ointments of valerian and other herbs were made by the Incas, and in Central America, the Mayans steamed their patients in cramped clay structures.

    North Americans used aromatherapy in more traditional ways, using steam to treat congestion, chronic pain, headaches, fainting and other problems. Echinacea, a commonly used herb today, was used as a smoke treatment for migraines or headaches.

    Even though this complement to touch therapy has strong ancient roots, it was not actually called “aromatherapy" until the 1930s.
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    A , Preventive Medicine, answered
    Smell is the most powerful of our senses. Experiment with different scents according to your moods. On days that you feel lazy, tired or depressed, use an invigorating citrus flavor like lemon or orange. On mornings you wake up anxious, fearful, or nervous, you may want to choose the calming aromas of lavender, chamomile, or clary sage. You way want to choose a sensual scent such as jasmine or patchouli to feel amorous. Aromatherapy is not a passing fad: herbal and floral essences are shown to have an immediate effect on the brain and nervous system. There are many books on the market about aromatherapy to help you choose a scent for your particular need.
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    A , Internal Medicine, answered
    While you're at the grocery store, buy some lemons, grapefruit and peppermint tea, then stop at the drugstore for a lavender lotion or spray. Science says it isn't a splurge. Hospitals have been giving anxious patients a whiff of lavender before sliding them into a narrow MRI tube -- it increases the percentage who get through the claustrophobic experience by a third. The lemons? Another relaxant. Slice one into your next warm bath. It could be twice as detensing.

    Peppermint (and rosemary) trigger alertness -- perfect when you've got a must-do job and can't focus. Grapefruit's scent curbs hunger, and peppermint enhances the effect. Watching your waist? Make a habit of half a grapefruit with a peppermint chaser (tea or just a stick of peppermint gum). The fruit's juicy fiber fills you up with nearly no calories.

    The fragrance combo helps keep your appetite small, and your waistline, too. Bliss.
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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered
    Some fragrances can help you feel more relaxed. For example, lavender aromatherapy is a popular complementary treatment for mental relaxation. In one study published in the International Journal of Cardiology, researchers studied 30 healthy men who inhaled essence of lavender for 30 minutes and concluded that the fragrance reduced blood levels of cortisol, a so-called stress hormone.

    If you are tempted to purchase a scented skin care product, however, be aware that fragrances added to products are the most common cause of skin reactions, such as redness, itching, and blotchiness.
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    A , Alternative & Complementary Medicine, answered
    An aromatherapy massage uses fragrant plant-derived oils in massage. Various fragrant oils promote different effects. For example, a bit of mint oil in a massage will produce a tingling sensation, and will be stimulating. Another oil like clary sage when added to massage oil will promote relaxation. Sandalwood clears the mind and engenders a pleasant peace. The use of different fragrant oils in massage is a great way to enhance the overall massage experience.
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    A , Cardiology (Cardiovascular Disease), answered

    Aromatherapy uses the power of distinctive-smelling essential oils derived from fragrant plants. These wonderful smelling oils hijack stress and promote relaxation by affecting parts of the brain that control mood and emotion. They can be inhaled directly, used in a diffuser that atomizes droplets into the air, or diluted in a solution that is applied on the skin. Essential oils are also used during Shirodhara, a form of Ayurveda medicine developed by Hindus now practiced in the West.

    Essential oils can be used to promote general well-being and as a supportive therapy to help ease side effects of treatment, particularly helpful during cancer chemotherapy. Certain essential oils are thought to have antibacterial, antiviral, and antifungal properties and can help to reduce muscular aches and pains caused by inflammation.


    This content originally appeared on doctoroz.com
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    A , Psychology, answered
    Aromatherapy can help you to de-stress. Chamomile is known for calming the stomach and mind, as are the scents of lavender and ylang ylang. You can buy these items at shops that sell home and bath products. You can keep them in your office, put drops on your pillow, or use them in candle or essential oil form to scent a room or your bathtub. You can also use edible herbs as tea (as in the case of chamomile).
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    A , Preventive Medicine, answered
    I use lavender combinations with my patients with cancer and other critical diseases. I also use lavender for my people with grief, anxiety, and depression disorders. Lavender is an ancient herb with calming properties that works incredibly for stress, anxiety, and depression. Lavender is known for its ability to comfort. Lavender seeds were used in classrooms in 19th century France to calm boisterous children, French pharmacies sold lavender for generations as a sleep aid. Nagano College of Nursing in Japan monitored the electrocardiograms, blood flow, and respiratory rates of nursing students after they enjoyed a footbath with lavender oil, and they found significant changes in autonomic activity, which increased relaxation.
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    An aromatherapist is a person who practices a type of complementary medicine called aromatherapy. This therapy uses plant oils that give off strong, pleasant smells to promote relaxation and a sense of well-being. The plant oils are usually inhaled or put on the skin using wet cloths, baths, or massage.

    This answer is based on source information from the National Cancer Institute.